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by Gabriel Haslip-Viera
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Gabriel Haslip-Viera
  • ISBN:
    1558762582
  • ISBN13:
    978-1558762589
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Markus Wiener Pub (July 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    140 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1802 kb
  • ePUB format
    1753 kb
  • DJVU format
    1112 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    384
  • Formats:
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Gabriel Haslip-Viera, City University of New York, is the author of Crime and Punishment in Late Colonial Mexico . Note: this book shows a strong biased against the Taínos, and yet it provides useful insights into Taino word usage). 12 people found this helpful.

Gabriel Haslip-Viera, City University of New York, is the author of Crime and Punishment in Late Colonial Mexico City, 1692-1810.

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Haslip Viera, Gabriel. Taíno Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Identity and Cultural Politics. Oxford: Signal Books. Land Rights and Garifuna Identity. Princeton: Markus Weiner. Haslip Viera, Gabriel. Race, Identity, Politics, Puerto Rican Neo-Tainos in the Diaspora and the Island. New York: Latino Studies Press. North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA) Report on the Americas 38, no. 2. New York: NACLA. Vitoria, Francisco de.

Local/diasporic Tai?nos : towards a cultural politics of memory, reality, and imagery, Arlene Da?vila Making indians out of blacks : the .

Local/diasporic Tai?nos : towards a cultural politics of memory, reality, and imagery, Arlene Da?vila Making indians out of blacks : the revitalization of Tai?no identy in contemporary Puerto Rico, Jorge Duany What's in a name, an indian name?, Peter Roberts The indians are coming! The indians are coming! : the Tai?no and Puerto Rican identity, Miriam Jime?nez Roma?n Rethinking Tai?no, Roberto Mucardo Borrero. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Gabriel Haslip-Viera is professor emeritus and former chair of th. Taino Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Idetity and Cultural Politics. by Gabriel Haslip-Viera. He was also Director of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College from September 1997 to January 2000, and chaired the former Department of Latin American and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at City College from 1985 to 1991, and again from 1993 to 1995.

Note: this book shows a strong biased against the Taínos, and yet it provides useful insights into Taíno word . Markus Wiener Publishers, Princeton .

Note: this book shows a strong biased against the Taínos, and yet it provides useful insights into Taíno word usage). Fajardo, Juan Cristobal Nápoles (known as Cucalambé 1829–1862?). Cucalambé (Décimas Cubanas.

This simulating and timely collection examines the Taíno revival movement, a grassroots conglomeration of Puerto Ricans and other Latinos who promote or have adopted the culture and pedigree of the pre-Columbian Taíno Indian population of Puerto Rico and the western Caribbean. The Taínos became a symbol of Puerto Rican identity at the end of the nineteenth century, when local governments and nationalistic intellectuals began to appropriate the Taínos for the conception of a socially and racially balanced Puerto Rican society.

Taino Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Identity and Cultural Politics . The book quickly became a classic of Latin American letters. Haslip-Viera, G, ed. 2001. Taino Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Identity and Cultural Politics.

Dominicans in the United States hail originally from a country that played a lead role in the dissemination of the Indigenista dogma in the nineteenth century. Princeton, NJ: Markus Wiener.

Local/Diasporic Taínos: Towards a Cultural Politics of Memory, Reality and Imagery Taíno Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Identity and Cultural Politics. En G. Haslip-Viera (E. Local/Diasporic Taínos: Towards a Cultural Politics of Memory, Reality and Imagery. Taíno Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Identity and Cultural Politics, pp. 33-53. Princeton: Markus Wiener Publishers. com/ Pagán Sobre arqueologías de liberación.

Markus Wiener Publishers, Princeton . Xaymaca is actually an Arawak word meaning "island of springs", which is where the name Jamaica is derived from (Pryce, 1997).

This stimulating and timely collection examines the Taíno revival movement, a grassroots conglomeration of Puerto Ricans and other Latinos who promote or have adopted the culture and pedigree of the pre-Columbian Taíno Indian population of Puerto Rico and the western Caribbean. The Taínos became a symbol of Puerto Rican identity in the 19th century, when local governments and intellectuals began to appropriate the Taínos for the conception of a socially and racially balanced Puerto Rican society.

Modern critics now claim that the Taíno heritage has been canonized through state-sponsored institutions, such as festivals, museums, and textbooks, at the expense of blacks. In the past, officials, alarmed at the black majorities on other Caribbean Islands, tried to "whiten" Puerto Rican society by calling all people of color Taínos. Others complain that the Taíno revival lost its fervor, evolving from an anti-colonialist movement to a mere fashionable trend over the years.


breakingthesystem
Haslip-Viera, Gabriel (editor) 2001. Taíno Revival. Critical perspectives on Puerto Rican identity and cultural politics. Marcus Wiener Publishers, Princeton, New Jersey.

It is an interesting book. However, as a biological scientist much of what is stated and especially what is omitted rings a little odd. For example:

p. 5 and following The condemnation of the politics of "Africoid centrism" appear justified. However, the editor does not discuss the apparent reality of a pre-Columbian African presence in the Americas, such as the Olmec "heads" and the apparent African origins of some approximately 10,000 year old human remains in Brazil. Thus the presentation lacks balance.

p. 18 Notes second paragraph the almost total rejection of the mitochondrial DNA data supporting partial Taína inheritance in present day populations appears odd as it is seemingly based on spurious arguments for "pureza de sangre" that are familiar to me from Cuba. The editor here ignores the social and promotional needs to self-servingly and falsely demonstrate "pureza de sangre" in Colonial Spanish-America. It was common to demonstrate "pureza de sangre" by having the neighbors who most probably were related by marriage swear that this was so.

p. 89 and following In support of this volume the arguments against previous point are presented by in Dr. Peter Roberts contribution and his most interesting discussion of the Siboneyista movement. Yet, reader notes that the designation of Guajiro as a foreign term seems improper, since this word is clearly, as many scholars have noted, derived from Guaoxerí an indigenous Taíno title of nobility. Such statements by Dr. Roberts could readily be taken to imply, falsely I feel sure, anachronistic views of the seafaring Taíno (Island Arawak) culture which was not limited to present political boundaries in the Caribbean but was at least semi-contiguous with continental Arawaks.

p. 120 and following. This is an example of the polemics which distract from genuine contributions of this volume. Thus I find it jarring and unprofessional when contributor Dr. Miriam Jiménez Roman attacks the rather naive, but apparently well meaning individuals by name. Dr Jiménez statement on the extinction of the Taíno, is contrary to the data of others and my personal experience growing up in the Sierra Maestra of Cuba.

This plus this author's concentration on introduced crop practices and her complete lack of mention of the vastly complex Taíno rural technology and crop germplasm still in use in the Caribbean might appear to be disingenuous.

All this suggests that this volume although the material offered is very useful, offers far too many polemic and readily refuted arguments and thus the conclusions reached, but not the compendium of materials presented, have considerably diminished credibility.

Thus this work will remain on my bookshelves as a companion to similarly useful, but flawed and opinionated volumes as:

D' Estéfano Pisani, Miguel A. 1943. La Delincuencia de los Indios de Cuba. Jesus Montero (Editor), La Habana. (Note: this book shows a strong biased against the Taínos, and yet it provides useful insights into Taino word usage).
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After some time has passed, I have to downgrade my previous 3-star ranking of this book for the same reasons Professor Haslip-Viera offered. Perhaps another book would be the better venue to speak of the alleged relative downgrading of Puerto Rico's African-American past in the minds of Puerto Ricans. A book on Taino revivalism, however, should surely focus more on Taino Indians, rather than lament tangentially, and at disproportionate narrative length, that Puerto Rico's African past has been overlooked (albeit a noteworthy observation) by Puerto Ricans. Tainvo Revival is still an interesting read, but the book's title is a bit of a misnomer given the author's main interest in African-American contributions to Puerto Rico's past, a topic that deserves more expansion in a separate text.