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by Richard Dawkins
Download River Out of Eden: A Darwinian View of Life (Science Masters Series) fb2
Science & Mathematics
  • Author:
    Richard Dawkins
  • ISBN:
    0465069908
  • ISBN13:
    978-1857994056
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Basic Books; Reprint edition (August 23, 1996)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science & Mathematics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1991 kb
  • ePUB format
    1748 kb
  • DJVU format
    1689 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    762
  • Formats:
    mobi lit docx azw


In River Out of Eden he introduces general readers to some fairly abstract problems in evolutionary biology, gently guiding us through the tangles of. .

In River Out of Eden he introduces general readers to some fairly abstract problems in evolutionary biology, gently guiding us through the tangles of mitochondrial DNA and the survival-of-the- fittest ethos. Superheroes need not apply: Dawkins writes, "The genes that survive. will be the ones that are good at surviving in the average environment of the species. I have read many of Dawkins' books and articles and this is a winner! If you're interested in learning exactly what Dawkins means by "The Selfish Gene" or the DNA river - this is the read & it's a quickie! The concepts are not as difficult in this book as in many others.

Page Flip: Enabled Oxford scientist Richard Dawkins is among Darwin's chief defenders, and an.

Similar books to River Out of Eden: A Darwinian View of Life (Science Masters Series). Kindle (5th Generation). Oxford scientist Richard Dawkins is among Darwin's chief defenders, and an able one indeed- witty, literate, capable of turning a beautiful phrase. Dawkins (The Selfish Gene) pictures evolution as a vast river of DNA-coded information flowing over millennia and splitting into three billion branches, of which 30 million branches?today's extant species?survive.

River Out of Eden: A Darwinian View of Life is a 1995 popular science book by Richard Dawkins. The book is about Darwinian evolution and summarizes the topics covered in his earlier books, The Selfish Gene, The Extended Phenotype and The Blind Watchmaker. It is part of the Science Masters series and is Dawkins's shortest book. It is illustrated by Lalla Ward, Dawkins's wife. The book's name is derived from Genesis 2:10 relating to the Garden of Eden

River Out of Eden book.

River Out of Eden book. Dawkins uses Darwinian evolution as a lens to look at a wide variety of different aspects of life on this planet, leading the reader down dozens of unique "wow, I never thought about it like that" moments. The implications of evolution often included things I never realized, and I had more "holy crap, that's awesome!" occurrences during this book than anything I've read recently.

Читать онлайн River Out Of Eden. A Darwinian View of Life. Illustrations by lalla ward. a master of the art of making things clear

Читать онлайн River Out Of Eden. To the memory of. Henry Colyear Dawkins (1921-1992), Fellow of St. John's College, Oxford: a master of the art of making things clear. And a river went out of Eden to water the garden.

science writing that makes the reader feel like a genius ), Richard Dawkins confronts this ancient mystery. sr 1 10?ie UTF8&qid 1492121691&sr 8-10&keywords river+out+of+eden+a+darwinian+view+of+life.

Writing with characteristic wit and an ability to clarify complex phenomena (the New York Times described his style as the sort of science writing that makes the reader feel like a genius ), Richard Dawkins confronts this ancient mystery. f sr 1 10?ie UTF8&qid 1492121691&sr 8-10&keywords river+out+of+eden+a+darwinian+view+of+life.

Richard Dawkins is an evolutionary biologist renowned throughout the .

Richard Dawkins is an evolutionary biologist renowned throughout the world. He was educated at Oxford and taught zoology before becoming the first holder of the Charles Simonyi Chair of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University, in 1995. His previous books rank among the most influential intellectual works of our time. They include THE SELFISH GENE (1976), RIVER OUT OF EDEN (1995), and UNWEAVING THE RAINBOW (1999).

River Out of Eden: A Darwinian View of Life. Easily the most influential book published in the nineteenth century, Darwin’s The Origin of Species is also that most unusual phenomenon, an altogether readable discussion of a scientific subject. On its appearance in 1859 it was immediately recognized. Climbing Mount Improbable. by Elspeth Huxley · Richard Dawkins.

Richard Dawkins has written two book very similar to each other. River Out Eden and the Blind Watch Maker. The Blind Watch maker is more complex and more detailed. But River out of Eden lays out Darwinian theory beatifully and in an understandable form. Recently Viewed and Featured.

And a river went out of Eden to water the garden.

How did the replication bomb we call ”life” begin and where in the world, or rather, in the universe, is it heading? Writing with characteristic wit and an ability to clarify complex phenomena (the New York Times described his style as ”the sort of science writing that makes the reader feel like a genius”), Richard Dawkins confronts this ancient mystery.

Unnis
I finally get him!!! Guess what? Your DNA is eternal, not you. It flows like a river through us (and all creatures) and we are merely the banks (of the river) that house the DNA for its continuation into next generation, and the next (or not).

I have read many of Dawkins' books and articles and this is a winner! If you're interested in learning exactly what Dawkins means by "The Selfish Gene" or the DNA river - this is the read & it's a quickie! The concepts are not as difficult in this book as in many others. Rather, it's a layman's explanation of our beginnings from the replication bombs in space to the biological zygote (or previous bacteria) and on to our own technological replication bombs. Now, I get why he was lead to the next step: memes.
A fun read about the river of DNA that flows in all of us! And, it was particularly interesting to learn about Mitochondrial eve and the importance of the female line as it is always a pure line (no mixing of DNA there!), making it much easier for scientists to study.
Arihelm
After the blind watchmaker, I wasn't going to read any more Dawkins until I read the Selfish Gene, but I found this book in a dollar bin and because its so short I went ahead and read it. This book really benefits from its short length, for once Dawkins seems to really stay on track and not ramble on. I sometimes feel that the other of his book are filled with 30% fluff just to make them longer. The book follows a digital river (DNA), and uses that to follow first bacteria type of cells, then multi-part cells, then complex life. I can see people rating this book lower because it often references The Selfish Gene, The Extended Phenotype and The Blind Watchmaker, and I assume that everything included in this book is included in those books with much more detail, so after reading those books this one might become redundant, but I think this one is likely a good introduction to Dawkins thought and writing.
Ishnsius
Nice run through the principles of how life formed on this planet and progressed to its current state. As a novice, I at times found hard to read but I figured out enough to have a simple understanding of evolution.
Gardataur
This is a short little book that really explains how DNA and evolution work. It is aimed at a general audience, and it succeeds very well, in my opinion. I bought this book for my son in 1995, to help him in biology, and I was very pleased with it. It was my introduction to the works of Dawkins, and since then I have read "the Selfish Gene" and many others. So many people have borrowed my tattered old copy that I decided to buy this one for a loaner! It would make a nice gift to any high school student who has a lousy biology teacher!
Shak
This is not Dawkins at his best, although he means well. It starts off on an inspirational note, but then devolves into variegated ruminations. Much of the territory covered in the first-two chapters presupposes much antecedent information that naive readers may find baffling or confusing. He also takes a dismissive, rather than explanatory, attitude toward vitalism in the third chapter. I agree that vitalism is no longer viable, but this needs demonstration, not just derision. His chapter on Design answers the critics, except for one critical point: How did the difference sexes evolve, which to me is the truest difficulty, not the evolution of the eyes (see Matt Ridley's "Red Queen" for the answer). The fourth chapter, concerning nature's utility, is the least interesting. Dawkins spends way too much time on population genetics rather than answer directly the question that Aristotle posed: What is it for? Since Aristotle, natural philosophy has been concerned with material, formal, efficient, and final causes, although all but efficient causality has fallen by the wayside in modernity, except for Creationists. For them, a residue of final causality still exists, What is something for, or what is its function? This is an intelligible question when asked of human production and artefacts, but quite useless when asked of nature, unless one gives Dawkins' pithy response: DNA replication. But it doesn't take a whole chapter to answer the question that forthrightly. This is Dawkins' most patronizing and unflattering work; he's always tendentious, but capable of much better.
Zyniam
Richard Dawkins presents clear and insightful arguments supported by examples to show that we do not need a god to explain the development of life on earth. Some speculation about where to from here.
An enjoyable read. I would have liked it to be longer.