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by Mary Somerville
Download On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (Cambridge Library Collection - Physical  Sciences) fb2
Science & Mathematics
  • Author:
    Mary Somerville
  • ISBN:
    1108005195
  • ISBN13:
    978-1108005197
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press; Reprint edition (July 20, 2009)
  • Pages:
    472 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science & Mathematics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1833 kb
  • ePUB format
    1492 kb
  • DJVU format
    1870 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    156
  • Formats:
    mobi txt lrf lit


Mary Somerville (1780-1872) was a leading mathematician and astronomer at a time when the education of most women was restricted.

Mary Somerville (1780-1872) was a leading mathematician and astronomer at a time when the education of most women was restricted. On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1834) demonstrated that scientific discoveries tend 'to simplify the laws of nature, and to unite detached branches by general principles. Start reading On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Series: Cambridge Library Collection - Physical Sciences. Recommend to librarian. Mary Somerville (1780–1872) would have been a remarkable woman in any age, but as an acknowledged leading mathematician and astronomer at a time when the education of most women was extremely restricted, her achievement was extraordinary. Laplace famously told her that 'There have been only three women who have understood me. These are yourself, Mrs Somerville, Caroline Herschel and a Mrs Greig of whom I know nothing. Mary Somerville was in fact Mrs Greig.

The physical sciences as we know them today began to emerge as independent academic subjects during .

The physical sciences as we know them today began to emerge as independent academic subjects during the early modern period, in the work of Newton and other 'natural philosophers', and numerous sub-disciplines developed during the centuries that followed. This part of the Cambridge Library Collection is devoted to landmark publications in this area which will be of interest to historians of science concerned with individual scientists, particular discoveries, and advances in scientific method, or with the establishment and development of scientific institutions around the world.

Mobile version (beta). On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (Cambridge Library Collection - Physical Sciences). Download (pdf, . 9 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. .Your privacy is important to us. We do not sell or trade your information with anyone. Would you consider becoming a monthly donor starting next month? Monthly support helps ensure that anyone curious enough to seek knowledge will be able to find it here. Together we are building the public libraries of the future.

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On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences is one of the biggest selling science books in the 19th century. It was written by Mary Somerville in 1834. On the connection of the physical sciences at the Internet Archive.

English: Title page of On the connexion of the physical sciences, by Mrs. Somerville (London : J. Murray, 1834). S646 1834, Library collections, Science History Institute. date QS:P571,+1834-00-00T00:00:00Z/9. Science History Institute. 315 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106.

Mary Somerville was in fact Mrs Greig. Her intention was to demonstrate the remarkable tendency of modern scientific discoveries 'to simplify the laws of nature, and to unite detached branches by general principles. This and her next book, the two-volume Physical Geography, also reissued in this series, were enormously influential both within the scientific community and beyond.

Book digitized by Google from the library of University of California and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Mary Somerville You can read On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences by Mary Somerville in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Mary Somerville (1780-1872) would have been a remarkable woman in any age, but as an acknowledged leading mathematician and astronomer at a time when the education of most women was extremely restricted, her achievement was extraordinary. Laplace famously told her that 'There have been only three women who have understood me. These are yourself, Mrs Somerville, Caroline Herschel and a Mrs Greig of whom I know nothing.' Mary Somerville was in fact Mrs Greig. After (as she herself said) translating Laplace's work 'from algebra into common language', she wrote On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1834). Her intention was to demonstrate the remarkable tendency of modern scientific discoveries 'to simplify the laws of nature, and to unite detached branches by general principles.' This and her next book, the two-volume Physical Geography, also reissued in this series, were enormously influential both within the scientific community and beyond.