» » Causality and Chance in Modern Physics

Download Causality and Chance in Modern Physics fb2

by David Bohm
Download Causality and Chance in Modern Physics fb2
Science & Mathematics
  • Author:
    David Bohm
  • ISBN:
    0812210026
  • ISBN13:
    978-0812210026
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Pennsylvania Press; Reissue edition (January 28, 1971)
  • Pages:
    184 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science & Mathematics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1645 kb
  • ePUB format
    1349 kb
  • DJVU format
    1876 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    645
  • Formats:
    lit azw docx doc


Folkscanomy: A Library of Books.

Folkscanomy: A Library of Books. Additional Collections. Uploaded by EESSKFUPM on October 4, 2017.

Bohm regards causality and chance-necessary causes and chance contingencies-as two . Bohm in this book attacks to Standard Interpretation of Quantum Physics.

Bohm regards causality and chance-necessary causes and chance contingencies-as two aspects of all processes. Any theory that embraces one to the exclusion of the other is inherently incomplete. Neither causal laws nor laws of chance can ever be perfectly correct, because each inevitably leaves out some aspect of what is happening in broader contexts. He starts with definition of Physical Theories, Laws of Nature, discusses Statistical Mechanics and goes into Deterministic Mechanicstic Philosophys and indeterminist Mechanistic Philosophy.

In this book, David Bohm explores the concepts of causality, chance, and natural law as they arise in and apply to physics. After a general overview presenting his views on the subject and contrasting them with the sm that is common amongst physicists, he explores the development of classical, relativistic, and quantum physics through both lenses. In discussing quantum mechanics, he concludes that the usual (Copenhagen) interpretation requires abandoning concepts of causality In this book, David Bohm explores the concepts of causality, chance, and natural law as they arise.

Home Browse Books Book details, Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. Publication year: 1957. Contributors: David Bohm. Subjects: Causality (Physics). Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. In nature nothing remains constant. Everything is in a perpetual state of transformation, motion, and change.

Bohm's challenging book perhaps marks the beginning of a retreat from high-flown .

Bohm's challenging book perhaps marks the beginning of a retreat from high-flown obscurantism and a return to common sense in science. -Scientific American. Bohm's ideas deserve careful study. David Bohm (1917-1992) was an American-born British theoretical physicist who developed a causal, nonlocal interpretation of quantum mechanics.

In this classic, David Bohm was the first to offer us his causal interpretation of the quantum theory. Required Reading for Physics Students! By Thriftbooks. com User, April 20, 2002. I consider this book a ge. he forthright explanations of mechanistic systems, both deterministic and indeterministic, will help to awaken any student of physics as to the degree to which their world-view may not be as broad as they had imagined. The concerns raised about quantum mechanics are not trivial or extreme.

Causality and chance in modern physics. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

In this classic, David Bohm was the first to offer us his causal interpretation of the quantum theory

In this classic, David Bohm was the first to offer us his causal interpretation of the quantum theory.

Are you sure you want to remove Causality and chance in modern physics from your list?

Causality and chance in modern physics. Are you sure you want to remove Causality and chance in modern physics from your list? Causality and chance in modern physics. New ed. with new pref. Published 1984 by Routledge & Kegan Paul in London. In library, Philosophy, Causality (Physics), Natural law, Chance, Quantum theory, Physics.

In this classic, David Bohm was the first to offer us his causal interpretation of the quantum theory. Causality and Chance in Modern Physics continues to make possible further insight into the meaning of the quantum theory and to suggest ways of extending the theory into new directions.

Helldor
I think this is the best book about the fundamental assumptions of science I have ever read. David Bohm is one of the wisest and open-minded thinkers I've ever encountered. He believes that science should be based on the assumption of the "qualitative infinity of nature." We shouldn't assume that anything is what it is absolutely. "Any given set of qualities and properties of matter and categories of laws expressed in terms of these qualities and properties is applicable only within limited contexts, over limited ranges of conditions and to limited degrees of approximation...." The continued existence of any entity or property depends on a balance of the processes tending to change it in different directions. "The broader the context or longer period of time, the more opportunity for that balance to be fundamentally altered." This is consistent with what the process philosophers have told us: Being is just an abstraction from becoming.

Scientific laws can apply only conditionally, not absolutely; they are always subject to revision. We should doubt that any description of "elementary particles" or statement of laws governing them could constitute a full and final description of reality. We should also doubt that we can know the universe's future: "the prediction of the 'heat death' of the universe will probably be invalidated by qualitatively new developments reflecting the inexhaustible and infinite character of the universal process of becoming."

Much of Bohm's book is a critique of the philosophy of mechanism, which he regards as an unjustified extrapolation from science's success in discovering certain conditional mechanistic relationships. Mechanism aims to reduce everything to interactions between basic entities with fixed qualities, like the parts of a machine. This overlooks another kind of relation, the "reciprocal relationship" between an entity and the broader context that makes it what it is. The earliest forms of mechanism were deterministic, assuming that the future could be calculated from the initial positions and velocities of entities and the forces acting upon them. Bohm does not confine his critique to deterministic mechanism, but extends it to the indeterministic mechanism of quantum mechanics. The conventional interpretation of QM attributes an absolute and final validity to the indeterminacy principle, so that only a statistical description of reality is permitted and no causal interpretation of phenomena is even pursued. Bohm regards causality and chance--necessary causes and chance contingencies--as two aspects of all processes. Any theory that embraces one to the exclusion of the other is inherently incomplete. "Neither causal laws nor laws of chance can ever be perfectly correct, because each inevitably leaves out some aspect of what is happening in broader contexts." That's why Bohm has led the search for a "hidden variables" interpretation of QM. In the end, Bohm regards the mechanistic philosophy in all its forms as contrary to the spirit of scientific inquiry, since it tends to regard a limited truth as the whole truth. "The essential character of scientific research is that it moves towards the absolute by studying the relative, in its inexhaustible multiplicity and diversity."

In contrast to the mechanistic philosophy, Bohm proposes a more holistic and organic view. "The inter-relationships of the parts (or sub-wholes) within a system depend crucially on the state of the whole, in a way that is not expressible in terms of properties of the parts alone. Indeed, the parts are organized in ways that flow out of the whole. The usual mechanistic notion that the organization, and indeed, the entire behaviour, of the whole derives solely from the parts and their predetermined inter-relationships thus breaks down."

Recommended for readers interested in theoretical physics or the philosophy of science.
Grosho
I consider this book a gem.
The forthright explanations of mechanistic systems, both deterministic and indeterministic, will help to awaken any student of physics as to the degree to which their world-view may not be as broad as they had imagined.
The concerns raised about quantum mechanics are not trivial or extreme. And they are raised with deliberation and humility. Likewise, so are Bohm's suggested solutions.
Finally, and most importantly I think, the argument for a world-view of physics that presumes - as the most scientifically (investigationally speaking) useful view to take - that the universe is comprised of an infinite number of levels of depth and complexity. Perhaps there are not an infinite number of levels of reality, but to presuppose there is opens the mind to want to investigate what they might be. Thus, supposing that QM defines and "explains" the 'bottom' of reality is first, not a logically strong position (just as Brownian motion formulas do not "explain" such motion as a fundamental aspect of nature) and secondly, such a view is scientifically inhibiting: supposing that QM *is* the bottom level of reality is rather silly in light of our historical knowledge of how humans have consistently misjudged the 'fundamental' aspects of nature in the past, and supposing we have reached it now via QM is a dubious claim. Further, even the issue of determinism vs. indeterminism may be a moot point: it may be at a lower level of reality, there is no such distinction - we may be seeing those two 'macroscopic' aspects of a more basic or inclusive feature of reality.
If you want to be an original thinker in physics (or perhaps any science or philosophy), this book is a good starting point to help you realize how easily assumptions of the nature of reality slip past our awareness.
Viashal
Bohm in this book attacks to Standard Interpretation of Quantum Physics. He starts with definition of Physical Theories, Laws of Nature, discusses Statistical Mechanics and goes into Deterministic Mechanicstic Philosophys and indeterminist Mechanistic Philosophy. He attackes Bohr and Heisenberg on their stand that Uncertainity Principal is the rule of the nature and foundation of Quantum Physics.Claims it is not conclusively proven as a rule and than argues that one can always find new Theory that can be fundemantally different from Uncertainity Principle, yet could explain nature better and yields current Quantum Physics as complimentarity. Although he claims that Heisenberg's claim is with no foundation, I believe he fails to prove that Nature can not be explained completely with limited number of laws and concepts.His argument against Heisenberg could be reversed and used against his own argument
Leceri
In this book David Bohm explains his understanding of causality that is not so well covered in his later works. It is a valuable gem from a special mind (Bohm) for anyone looking for truth and its relationship with science
Kipabi
just great !