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by David Rindos
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Science & Mathematics
  • Author:
    David Rindos
  • ISBN:
    0125892810
  • ISBN13:
    978-0125892810
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Academic Press (December 28, 1987)
  • Pages:
    344 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science & Mathematics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1939 kb
  • ePUB format
    1655 kb
  • DJVU format
    1148 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
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    986
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He reinforces the great contributions of the authors who have dealt with the issue until that time to understand the origins of agriculture. However, he clarifies errors in some approaches used to try to explain "origins of agriculture. When I read the first 3 chapters of Rindos, what he thought about origins of agriculture, at least in part, reminds me of the quote from the German General Heinz Guderian oin the book by Antony Beevor, I think in "Berlim the Downfall". One person found this helpful.

Authors: David Rindos. Description The book begins by discussing cultural change, the domestication of plants, and th. . eBook ISBN: 9781483269542. Imprint: Academic Press. The Origins of Agriculture: An Evolutionary Perspective presents an alternative approach to understanding cultural variation and change. It aims to demonstrate that domestication and the origin of agricultural systems are best understood by attempting to explicate the evolutionary forces that affected that development of domesticates and agricultural systems. The book begins by discussing cultural change, the domestication of plants, and the origin of agricultural systems in the most general of terms.

The Origins of Agriculture is an attempt to use the perspective of evolutionary biology to shed light on what is.The fifth chapter is in many ways the core of the book

The Origins of Agriculture is an attempt to use the perspective of evolutionary biology to shed light on what is probably the most controversial area of human prehistory. The first chapter summarises the existing literature on the origins of agriculture; the goal here is to try and loosen the grip of the 'paradigm of consciousness' - the insistence that intentional changes in human behaviour must lie at the heart of the 'adoption' of agriculture. The fifth chapter is in many ways the core of the book. Here Rindos attempts to construct a completely mechanistic model for the origins of agriculture, building on the foundations laid down in the previous chapters.

The book begins by discussing cultural change, the domestication of plants, and the origin of.The final two chapters present models for the origin and spread of agricultural systems based upon Darwinian evolutionary theory.

The book begins by discussing cultural change, the domestication of plants, and the origin of agricultural systems in the most general of terms. Subsequent chapters examine the world of domestication and agriculture and present a series of concepts that may permit a more natural explanation for these processes. These include concepts such as incidental domestication, specialized domestication, and agricultural domestication. The final two chapters present models for the origin and spread.

The Origins of Agriculture: An Evolutionary Perspective presents an alternative approach to understanding .

The Origins of Agriculture: An Evolutionary Perspective presents an alternative approach to understanding cultural variation and change.

His book on the origins of agriculture, published in 1984, was hailed as a major innovative contribution to the field. University of Wollongong. David Rindos, The Origins of Agriculture: An Evolutionary Perspective (New York: Academic Press, 1984).

His book on the origins of agriculture, published in 1984, was hailed as a major innovative contribution to the field He died of a massive heart attack in 1996, aged 49. Life. Rindos graduated in sociology from Cornell University in 1969.

The Origins of Agriculture book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Origins of Agriculture: An Evolutionary Perspective as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Agricultural origins and dispersals The emergence of agriculture The epi-palaeolithic . The Origins of Agriculture: An Evolutionary Perspective. September 1986 · Man. Glynis Jones.

Agricultural origins and dispersals The emergence of agriculture The epi-palaeolithic southern Levant and the origins of agriculture. This book claims that among the diseases spread from animals to humans one of the greatest killers has been bovine tuberculosis, spread mainly through food and drink. It estimates at least 600,000 deaths from this cause between 1848 and 1960 in Great Britain, mainly due to infected milk and meat. It took that whole period to bring the disease under control in humans but the problem lingers in cattle.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780125892810. Release Date:December 1987.

Rindos, David (1987). Tooby, John & Leda Cosmides (1996). Friendship and the bankers paradox: Other pathways to the evolution of adaptations for altruism", Proceedings of the British Academy, 88, pp. 119-143. Rothstein, Bo (1998). Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (2008) The evolutionary psychology of the emotions and their relationship to internal regulatory variables.


Yainai
THE ORIGINS OF AGRICULTURE: An Evolutionary Perspective
David Rindos (1984)

I'm waiting for my book, but also bought an e-book that came out recently.
Rindos still seems a compass to review the origins of agriculture.
He reinforces the great contributions of the authors who have dealt with the issue until that time to understand the origins of agriculture.
However, he clarifies errors in some approaches used to try to explain "origins of agriculture." Rindos exposes a paradox that seems still not resolved.
For Darwin, cultivated plants were the safest evidence to develop the work of origins of species. Now the other way, Back to the Future, why would it not be right for us in the approaches of the origins of agriculture? The errors that Rindos clarifies, it seems, are still not accepted. We keep quoting him, but incorporating what he did want to tell us.
When I read the first 3 chapters of Rindos, what he thought about origins of agriculture, at least in part, reminds me of the quote from the German General Heinz Guderian oin the book by Antony Beevor, I think in "Berlim the Downfall". In Rindos style of writing, I was carryng out a "blind people’s dialog talking about colors" ....
Anazan
text book, came in great condition.
Agantrius
The development of agriculture was one of the most significant events in human history. For over a century, archaeologists debated the causes of this phenomenal change in the way humans acquire their food. In this expansion of his (1980) article in Current Anthropology, the late Dr. Rindos clarified the questions and provided the answers about this fascinating topic. More than any other book, Rindos' "The Origins of Agriculture" demonstrates the value, perhaps even the necessity, of a Darwinian approach to the examination of the archaeological record. A brief review can not do justice to this masterpiece.