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by Edith Wharton
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  • Author:
    Edith Wharton
  • ISBN:
    1848309112
  • ISBN13:
    978-1848309111
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wildhern Press (January 23, 2008)
  • Pages:
    148 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1396 kb
  • ePUB format
    1403 kb
  • DJVU format
    1437 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    650
  • Formats:
    lit mobi mbr lrf


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The Mother's Recompense book.

The Mother's Recompense, 1925. Twilight Sleep, 1927.

Wharton proposed the book to her publisher, Scribner's. The Mother's Recompense, 1925.

She involves us in an atmosphere of beauty and romance, that lead us to profound thinking about life. The Mother's Recompense" explores the difficulties of Kate Clephane, who abandoned her husband and daughter, and now lives as an unhappy divorcee on the Riviera. She's unexpectedly invited back, to attend her daughter's wedding - only to find that her daughter's fiancee is one of Kate's ex-lovers.

Originally published in 1925, The Mother's Recompense details the predicament Kate Clephane finds herself in. .

Originally published in 1925, The Mother's Recompense details the predicament Kate Clephane finds herself in when recalled to New York from her self-imposed exile to the French Riviera after she had abandoned her husband and infant daughter. What makes her return is the impending marriage of that same daughter, but what she finds is that the soon to be husband, Chris Fenno, was a man she had loved before her departure from New York

The Mother's Recompense' is a novel about a woman who abandoned her husband and child and who returns to her home city of New York after spending years in exile. Wharton's first poems were published in Scribner’s Magazine. The mother’s recompense.

The Mother's Recompense' is a novel about a woman who abandoned her .

The Mother's Recompense' is a novel about a woman who abandoned her husband and child and who returns to her home city of New York after spending years in exile. Wharton's first poems were published in Scribner's Magazine. In 1891, the same publication printed the first of her many short stories, titled 'Mrs.

But his mother’ll beat him if she finds out. Aline, you must hunt him up this very day and pay back what the flowers must have . She didn’t even know who they were, now that their formidable chieftain, her mother-in-law, was dead

But his mother’ll beat him if she finds out. Aline, you must hunt him up this very day and pay back what the flowers must have cost him. She lifted the violets and pressed them to her face. She didn’t even know who they were, now that their formidable chieftain, her mother-in-law, was dead. Lawyers, judges, trustees, guardians, she supposed - all the natural enemies of woman. She wrinkled her brows, trying to remember who, at the death of the child’s father, had been appointed the child’s other guardian - old Mrs. Clephane’s overpowering assumption of the office having so completely effaced her associate that it took a few minutes to fish him up out of the far-off past.

Originally published in 1925, The Mother's Recompense details the predicament Kate Clephane finds herself in when recalled to New York from her self-imposed exile to the French Riviera after she had abandoned her husband and infant daughter

Originally published in 1925, The Mother's Recompense details the predicament Kate Clephane finds herself in when recalled to New York from her self-imposed exile to the French Riviera after she had abandoned her husband and infant daughter. What makes her return is the impending marriage of that same daughter, but what she finds is that the soon to be husband, Chris Fenno, was a man she had loved before her departure from New York.

She was educated by private tutors and governesses at home and in Europe, where the family resided.

Download THE MOTHER´S RECOMPENSE free in PDF & EPUB format. Download the THE MOTHER´S RECOMPENSE ebook free.


Antuiserum
The ONLY reason this doesn't get five stars is due to the publisher's mistakes in printing: the long middle paragraph on page 92 is missing content, there is a missing comma on page 163 ("...she would tell him everything she thought" should have a comma after "everything"), and page 215 reads "with the accent of authority" when it ought to read "without the accent of authority." Thank you to my wonderful English 479 professor who provided me with the information on these misprints. If you're like me though, you'll be zooming through the text to find out what happens next and likely won't notice these errors! Excellent book!!!
just one girl
Selection for my book club. Showed lifestyles of the period. An enjoyable read.
Lailace
... and especially if you've already read most of them -- of Trollope, Dickens, Gaskell, Gissing, James, and perhaps some of their French counterparts -- there's no reason why you won't enjoy "A Mother's Recompense" by Edith Wharton (1862-1937). Published in 1925, "Recompense" has been regarded as Wharton's "breakaway-from-James" declaration of moral and literary independence. If so, it was a minute crack of a breakaway; "Redemption" is almost indistinguishable from early Henry James novels except for being graciously less involuted in language and strangely lacking in the sardonic humor that makes reading James worth the struggle.

I'm not going to tell you anything about the "plot" of A Mother's Recompense except that it hinges upon an implausible coincidence (as do so many Victorian novels) which in turn makes the narrative progress of the novel totally predictable from the third chapter on ... until the well-prepared and unforeseen outcome. How much closer to the Henry James of "The Bostonians" could she have come?

Well-paced. Crafty character development. Choice depictions of upper-class society in Late Victorian New York. Not a whiff of the 20th C. A fun read.
Nkeiy
You can see the climax coming a mile away, as another reader noted, but instead of detracting from the novel this merely deepens the pity you feel for its middle-aged heroine, trapped by the consequences of unheroic choices she made earlier in life. The novel shines a penlight into the "guiltiest swervings of the weaving heart" (A. R. Ammons) with the psychological subtlety of Henry James, the inexorable movement of Greek tragedy, and the profound insights of Wharton's own special terrain, the loneliness and poverty of single or divorced women who must face the judgment of a society they tried to abandon. At least at the end of this one, Kate is still alive and has regained, painfully, enough self-respect to endure her return to loneliness in peace. I am not sure the ending quite makes sense--there is no reason why her very determined daughter should not hunt her down and drag her back to family life in New York--but all the same the novel packs a big wallop. A must-read for admirers of Wharton.
Anaginn
Plot: It was pretty easy to figure out where things were headed in this book, but that didn't detract from the story. It's interesting to read about how once small incident can so greatly affect the lives of many.
Characters: None of the characters were particularly likable, but Wharton excels at writing characters that are fully fleshed out and seem very real. They don't need to be likable because you feel like you're reading about real people.
Overall: Some of Wharton's less famous works are really great, and this is one of those. I would definitely recommend it to fans of her writing. I always appreciate that her books are high quality, but are very readable and accessible.
Sarin
Not my favorite Wharton, but a fast, compelling read all the same. A woman who, in earlier years, deserted her husband and young daughter, finds her way back cleared by the passage of time and some convenient deaths. All is peachy until the mother finds her grown daughter attracted to man she herself has been involved with.

As a strong believer in the power of confession, I admit to impatience with secrets driving a plot, and I experienced irritation with Kate Clephane that approached Tess Durbeyfield proportions. Just say something, already! Daughter Anne was so earnest and intense that she needed a dose of truth.

I'm reaching the end of Wharton's major works, which is a bummer. At some point I may have to break down and read the short stories.
from earth
After reading "The Age of Innocence", "The House of Mirth", and "Custom the Country" I thought I'd read the best of Wharton. Not So! Wharton is always exemplary in portraying upper class late 19th century New Yorkers and their staid customs. Some things are de rigueur and others just aren't allowed. Unlike her earlier gilded age settings "Recompense" takes place post World War I and there are cars, easier travel within and without the country, telephones provide easier communication. In her early twenties Kate ran from her rules worshiping husband, leaving behind her three year old daughter. Worse still a society playboy helped her escape and then dumped her and everyone who matters knows about it. She exiles herself to Europe and settles in with other rule breakers. They partially redeem themselves with good works during the war. Time moves on. Divorce is invented! More importantly others from her social set misbehave eclipsing her own scandal. When her husband and then her mother-in-law die Kate's daughter invites her back home to live with her. Kate is surprised at how easily she fits back in, how nonchalantly her old cronies welcome her and mostly how much her daughter cares for her. The one love affair she allowed herself during her exile comes back to haunt her threatening her new life however. Despite this Kate sees vistas of possible happiness, but ultimately she has to decide between speaking the truth and hurting her daughter or keeping secrets that are almost impossible to swallow. Sadly her real choice narrows down to deciding whether she wants to feel alone and alienated in NY or on the Continent. At least this is territory she's already familiar with.