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by John Jacob Niles,Jonathan Williams
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  • Author:
    John Jacob Niles,Jonathan Williams
  • ISBN:
    0912330007
  • ISBN13:
    978-0912330006
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  • Publisher:
    The Jargon Society (June 1, 1971)
  • Pages:
    104 pages
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Upon Ulmann's death, a foundation she had established took custody of her images The Appalachian photographs of Doris Ulmann. Ulmann, . R. Coles, et al.

Upon Ulmann's death, a foundation she had established took custody of her images. Allen Eaton, John Jacob Niles, Olive Dame Campbell (of the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, North Carolina), Ulmann's brother-in-law Henry L. Necarsulmer, and Berea schoolteacher Helen Dingman were named trustees. Samuel H. Lifshey, a New York commercial photographer, developed the negatives Ulmann had exposed during her final trip, and then made proof prints from the vast archive of more than 10,000 glass plate negatives. The Appalachian photographs of Doris Ulmann. (1974). The darkness and the light.

Remembrance by John Jacob Niles. by Jonathan Williams. Doris Ulmann (d. 1934), Doris Ulmann.

Items related to The Appalachian Photographs of Doris Ulmann. From 1927, Ulmann was assisted on her rural travels by John Jacob Niles, a musician and folklorist who collected ballads while Ulmann photographed. Home John Jacob Niles The Appalachian Photographs of Doris Ulmann. In 1932 Ulmann began her most important series, assembling documentation of Appalachian folk arts and crafts for Allen Eaton's landmark 1937 book, Handicrafts of the Southern Highlands. In failing health, she suffered a collapse in August 1934 while working near Asheville, North Carolina and returned to New York. Doris Ulmann died August 28, 1934.

Ulmann's book of photographs waited silently on the shelves next to Ke A. .This book is now rare She was accompanied by her long-time friend, John Jacob Niles (1892 - 1980), a famous American folklorist and collector o.

Ulmann's book of photographs waited silently on the shelves next to Ke A Photographer Of Appalachia. I discovered photographer Doris Ulmann (1882 - 1934) and this rare book, "The Appalachian Photographs of Doris Ulmann" (1971) by chance. This book is now rare. Ulmann's Appalachian photographs were used in a book called "Handicrafts of the Southern Highlands" (1937) accompanying a text by Allen Eaton. The book was reprinted in 1973 but is now out of print. She was accompanied by her long-time friend, John Jacob Niles (1892 - 1980), a famous American folklorist and collector of folksongs.

Appalachian Photographs. The Appalachian Photographs of Doris Ulmann

Appalachian Photographs. The art of the quiet. Penland, North Carolina: Jargon, 1971. Quarto, original brown cloth, patterned endpapers, original photographic dust jacket. Also issued in paper wrappers, no priority established.

Doris Ulmann was an American photographer, best known for her dignified .

Doris Ulmann was an American photographer, best known for her dignified portraits of the people of Appalachia, particularly craftsmen and musicians such as Jean Ritchie's family, made between 1928 and 1934.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780912330006.

Doris Ulmann (1882-1934) was one of the foremost photographers of the twentieth century, yet until now there has never .

Doris Ulmann (1882-1934) was one of the foremost photographers of the twentieth century, yet until now there has never been a biography of this fascinating, gifted artist. In the last eighteen years of her life, Ulmann created over 10,000 photographs and illustrated five books, including Roll, Jordan, Roll and Handicrafts of the Southern Highlands. Inspired by the paintings of the European old masters and by the photographs of Hill and Adamson and Clarence White, Ulmann produced unique and substantial portrait studies.

John Jacob Niles with Blanche Scroggs, Brasstown, North Carolina; Doris Ulmann . Doris Ulmann International Center of Photography.

John Jacob Niles with Blanche Scroggs, Brasstown, North Carolina; Doris Ulmann (American, 1882 - 1934); about 1933–1934; Platinum print; 2. 1. cm (8 6 i. ; 8. M. 4; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, California. William Gedney Photographs and Writings Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library. Couple Working in Garden on Farm Security Housing Project Photographic Print by Carl Mydans Ar. om.

Allen Eaton, John Jacob Niles, Olive Dame Campbell (of the Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, North Carolina), Ulmann's brother-in-law Henry L. Necarsulmer, and Berea .

Doris Ulmann (1882 - 1934) was an American photographer, best known for her dignified portraits of the people of Appalachia, particularly craftsmen and musicians such as Jean Ritchie's family (an American folk music singer, songwriter, and Appalachian dulcimer player), made between 1928 and 1934. Ulmann's early work includes a series of portraits of prominent intellectuals, artists and writers: William Butler Yeats, John Dewey, Max Eastman, Sinclair Lewis, Lewis Mumford, Joseph Wood Krutch, Martha Graham, Anna Pavlova, Paul Robeson, and Lillian Gish. From 1927, Ulmann was assisted on her rural travels by John Jacob Niles, a musician and folklorist who collected ballads while Ulmann photographed. In 1932 Ulmann began her most important series, assembling documentation of Appalachian folk arts and crafts for Allen Eaton's landmark 1937 book, Handicrafts of the Southern Highlands. In failing health, she suffered a collapse in August 1934 while working near Asheville, North Carolina and returned to New York. Doris Ulmann died August 28, 1934. The New York Times said, "...these eloquent photographs of our vanishing American peasantry, ridiculed by the middle class as hillbillies, disclose a character that is altogether humbling.....To look at the lined, weathered faces of Christopher Lewis, Ella Webster, and Mrs. Bird Patten is to be reminded of the humanity and rooted communal life of these Southern Americans who are counted now simply as bureaucratic statistics in the poverty program. The recovery of Doris Ulmann's portraiture is typical of Jargon's cultural husbandry." The Jargon Society is an independent press founded by the American poet Jonathan Williams. Jargon has published seminal works of the American literary avant-garde as well as sui generis books of folk art.

Shliffiana
In the late 1920's and early 1930's, Doris Ulmann spent six months a year in Appalachia, going into its hollows and climbing its mountains to photograph its people. She was assisted by John Jacob Niles, who at the same time pursued his own interest in traditional music. She would take up to twenty photographs a day, store the silver gelatin glass plate negatives in her chauffeur-driven Lincoln automobile, and periodically send them back to her apartment on Park Avenue in New York City, where she developed them during the other six months of the year. The hundreds of photographs from these trips constitute a powerful vision -- and, perhaps, authentic record -- of the hardscrabble folk of Appalachia from almost one hundred years ago.

Sixty-three of Ullman's Appalachian photographs are presented in this book. All are portraits, usually of just one person but a few of groupings of two or three people. Farmers, preachers, housewives, weavers, two Meulungeons, basket makers, tanners, chair makers, fiddlers. Young and old. Weathered faces and gnarled hands. Stern gazes. Few display even a flicker of joy or humor. Was that their natural demeanor, or was it the way Ulmann preferred to pose her subjects, or was it what the committee who selected these sixty-three photographs gravitated towards? Nonetheless, all the photographs are arresting. (In choosing subjects, "a person had to be a character, more or less, before [Ulmann] became interested.")

THE APPALACHIAN PHOTOGRAPHS OF DORIS ULMANN is publication Number 50 of the Jargon Society, a distinctive small-press founded by the poet Jonathan Williams. (Guy Davenport described the Jargon Society as "a paradoxical fusion of fine printing and samizdat diffusion".) It is a beautiful book. There is a brief Preface by Jonathan Williams and a twenty-five-page essay on Ulmann, "As I Remember Her", by John Jacob Niles. (In addition to his invaluable work transcribing and preserving traditional Appalachian folk music, Niles is noted for composing the Christmas song "I Wonder As I Wander".)

Ulmann (b. 1882, d. 1934) is a noteworthy figure in American arts. In her youth she went to the Ethical Culture Fieldston School, which emphasized individual worth regardless of ethnic background or economic condition. After attending Columbia University, she studied photography at the Clarence H. White School of Modern Photography (where, among other noted photographers, Margaret Bourke-White and Dorothea Lange also studied). Ulmann devoted most of her photographic career to documenting the people and rural culture of the American South and Appalachia. Her book "Roll, Jordan Roll" on the Gullahs of the Sea Islands is, reportedly, a classic.

A fascinating counterpart to THE APPALACHIAN PHOTOGRAPHS OF DORIS ULMANN is "The Picture Man: Photographs by Paul Buchanan." Buchanan was an itinerant photographer who, between 1920 and 1951, wandered four North Carolina mountain counties. His subjects were everyday folk who paid hard-earned dimes and quarters and posed themselves as they wished to be memorialized. There is a marked contrast between Buchanan's photographs and Ulmann's. As Ann Hawthorne, editor of the Buchanan book, writes: Ulmann "painstakingly selected and posed her subjects, often having them dress in old, quaint clothes. Through her they became less individuals than icons, embodying her admiring but romanticized image of Appalachians. * * * Doris Ulmann was a photographer and artist. Paul Buchanan was the Picture Man."

Posed and romanticized though they may be, Ulmann's photographs are well worth viewing. I have had this book for more than forty years, and it has been unshelved and reviewed by guests or me at least a dozen times.
Bil
I discovered photographer Doris Ulmann (1882 - 1934) and this rare book, "The Appalachian Photographs of Doris Ulmann" (1971) by chance. I have access to a large, specialized library with a unique collection. I was interested in learning about the mountain people of Appalachia, and found in the library the specific book I wanted: Horace Kephart's classic work "Our Southern Highlanders" (1913,1922). Our Southern Highlanders: A Narrative of Adventure in the Southern Appalachians and a Study of Life Among the Mountaineers Ulmann's book of photographs waited silently on the shelves next to Kephart's volume. What was I to do?

Although she photographed a number of prominent people and professions during her career, Ulmann, a native of New York City, specialized in portraits of vanishing American cultures, especially among America's southern rural poor. She photographed southern African Americans from the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia, and the mountain people of Appalachia. Ulmann's photographs of the Sea Islands people were the basis of a book called "Roll Jordan Roll" (1933) with a text by Julia Peterkin. This book is now rare. Ulmann's Appalachian photographs were used in a book called "Handicrafts of the Southern Highlands" (1937) accompanying a text by Allen Eaton. The book was reprinted in 1973, Handicrafts of the Southern Highlands but is now out of print. A biography of Ulmann, "The Life and Photography of Doris Ulmann by Philip Walker Davis was published in 2001. The Life and Photography of Doris Ulmann

A frail, independently-wealthy woman, Ulmann traveled to and photographed Appalachia for several months each year from 1927 to 1934. She was accompanied by her long-time friend, John Jacob Niles (1892 - 1980), a famous American folklorist and collector of folksongs. Always fashionably dressed even under harsh conditions, Ulmann had a difficult time of it. Niles, a Kentucky native, helped Ulmann navigate through the mountains. He packed food for her, protected her from the elements, stayed with Ulmann during her illnesses and his own, and on more than one occasion, carried Ulmann on his back across a stream. While Ulmann photographed her subjects, Niles collected folksongs, such as "Barbara Allen" and "Pretty Polly". Niles wrote a lengthy introduction to this volume in which he described his friendship with Ulmann. He offered the following summary of Ulmann's approach to her art.

"She believed that all the people she photographed had one thing in common - a quality that could be called genuineness. But of all the people she photographed I believe the ones she loved most were the old mountaineers with white whiskers, the partriarchal types, and their ancient wives, though she also made many photos of young mountain men and women and their endless children. It was in the faces of the old men and women that she saw what attracted her the most - the care and trouble of their lives, but also the ultimate serenity. To record their images she was prepared to do hours of work."

This book also includes an introduction by Johnathan Williams, a British poet who was responsible for the initial selection of the photographs included in this collection. Williams quotes Ulmann's own understanding of her art, in language that is close to that of Niles:

"I have been more deeply moved by some of my mountaineers than by any literary person. A face that has the marks of having lived intensely, that expresses some phase of life, some dominant quality or intellectual power, constitutes for me an interesting face. For this reason the face of an older person, perhaps not beautiful in the strictest sense, is usually more appealing than the face of a younger person who has scarcely been touched by life."

The qualities that Ulmann sought to capture in her mountaineers are on display in this collection of 63 photographs. Most of these photographs are from the mountain regions of North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia. They are all portraits with Ulmann focusing on the face and on its expression. The subjects include wizened, elderly men and women, singles and couples, preachers, weavers, carvers, miners, and children. There are several photographs of mountain fiddlers, singers, and other musicians, perhaps reflecting Nile's influence. She shows a gaunt, proud, independent, and rural people. Many of the photographs show subjects of a highly reflective character. Ulmann's photographs captured the people of Appalachia just before the more famous photos of the region were taken by photographers, such as Walker Evans, under the sponsorship of the Farm Security Administration. Her photographs show a toughness and a lack of sentimentality that are her own. They capture a vanished world.

I was fortunate to come across this book and to learn something of both Doris Ulmann and the Appalachian mountain people. I hope this review will encourage readers to explore further one or both of these fascinating subjects. They capture something rare, little-known, and valuable about the United States.

Robin Friedman