» » When Experiments Travel: Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects

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by Adriana Petryna
Download When Experiments Travel: Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects fb2
Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Author:
    Adriana Petryna
  • ISBN:
    0691126577
  • ISBN13:
    978-0691126579
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Princeton University Press; 1 edition (May 17, 2009)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1480 kb
  • ePUB format
    1605 kb
  • DJVU format
    1260 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    847
  • Formats:
    lit mobi rtf lrf


In addition, a growing body of scholarly work has begun to explore the global production, circulation and consumption of pharmaceuticals (van der Geest and Reynolds Whyte, 1991; van der Geest et al, 1996; Biehl, 2004; Lakoff, 2005, 2007b; Petryna et al, 2006; Hayden, 2007a; Petryna, 2009).

How are experiments controlled and how is drug safety ensured? And do these experiments help or harm public health in the countries where they are conducted?

How are experiments controlled and how is drug safety ensured? And do these experiments help or harm public health in the countries where they are conducted?

In When Experiments Travel, Adriana Petryna has written a timely book.

In When Experiments Travel, Adriana Petryna has written a timely book. -Dinesh Sharma, Health Affairs. The issues that it raises are complex and profound.

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Similar books and articles. Sven Ove Hansson - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (2):149-167.

The phenomenal growth of global pharmaceutical sales and the quest for innovation are driving an unprecedented search for human test subjects, particularly in middle- and low-income countries. Our hope for medical progress increasingly depends on the willingness of the world's poor to participate in clinical drug trials. While these experiments often provide those in need with vital and previously unattainable medical resources, the outsourcing and offshoring of trials also create new problems. In this groundbreaking book, anthropologist Adriana Petryna takes us deep into the clinical trials industry as it brings together players separated by vast economic and cultural differences. Moving between corporate and scientific offices in the United States and research and public health sites in Poland and Brazil, When Experiments Travel documents the complex ways that commercial medical science, with all its benefits and risks, is being integrated into local health systems and emerging drug markets.

Providing a unique perspective on globalized clinical trials, When Experiments Travel raises central questions: Are such trials exploitative or are they social goods? How are experiments controlled and how is drug safety ensured? And do these experiments help or harm public health in the countries where they are conducted? Empirically rich and theoretically innovative, the book shows that neither the language of coercion nor that of rational choice fully captures the range of situations and value systems at work in medical experiments today. When Experiments Travel challenges conventional understandings of the ethics and politics of transnational science and changes the way we think about global medicine and the new infrastructures of our lives.


Malhala
If you have ever wondered how unsafe drugs make their way into the market, or if you have ever tried to get into a clinical trial, or if you wonder how risky clinical trials are, this book is for you. The author has travelled, interviewed, and read widely in order to gather her research (it's clear, for example, that if you have a heart attack, you'd do well to have it in Warsaw!). But there is a caveat here: this book is academic in nature and is not a page-turner in the usual sense. The information is pure gold, but you will on occasion have to plow through the bloated language of social anthropology. That said, once you get used to doing so, this is the stuff of both nightmare and hope. Clinical trials are subject to all the flaws of any human endeavor, and as awful as some of the flaws are, there are also efforts to correct the flaws, protect people, and ensure safe drugs. The book puts a whole new light on "informed consent"--basically, we aren't very informed and in some trials, information is withheld. As future or current patients, this book is a treasure.
Arashitilar
The content of the book is great and every MD should read it in my opinion.

However , sometimes I was really upset with the writing style. The author often uses meaningless or unimportant statements to validate him/herself, which are sometimes quite annoying.
"During the summers of 2003-2006, I worked in southern Brazil with industry-sponsored researchers and with physicians carrying out publicly sponsored research in a public university hospital. Over the years, I also engaged with academic scientists, policy makers, state prosecutors, and citizens ..." on page 18
"In my ethnographic work with various professionals within the contract research organizations (CRO) community (including company founders and clinical trial managers), the physicians with whom CROs contract, and pharmaceutical consultants ..." on page 32
Siralune
Interesting read about the pharm industry, and the clinical trials around the globe. Easy to read. provides perspective about equity in health care arond the globe.
Anazan
Love this book. One of the best books in the area of Medical Anthropology and Sociology. Book in decent condition.
Faegal
I needed it for a research paper, and it has great information relevant to a lack of patient protection in clinical trials.
Arith
Book was a bore, don't waste your time reading it. Was a requirement for school, so that's why I had to.
hardy
My takeaway from this engaging and careful reporting is to be very very careful of any new drug, and to wonder, yet again, at how greed trumps wellbeing in the pharmaceutical industry, as we experience the "pharmaceuticalization of health care"