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by Ari Larissa Heinrich
Download The Afterlife of Images: Translating the Pathological Body between China and the West (Body, Commodity, Text) fb2
Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Author:
    Ari Larissa Heinrich
  • ISBN:
    0822341131
  • ISBN13:
    978-0822341130
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Duke University Press Books (February 20, 2008)
  • Pages:
    248 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1358 kb
  • ePUB format
    1927 kb
  • DJVU format
    1145 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    849
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The Afterlife of Images book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Afterlife of Images book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Afterlife of Images: Translating the Pathological Body between China and the West (Body, Commodity, Text) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In The Afterlife of Images, Larissa N. Heinrich investigates the creation and circulation of Western medical . DIVIn 1739 China’s emperor authorized the publication of a medical text that included images of children with smallpox to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

Combining literary studies, the history of science, and visual culture studies, Heinrich analyzes the rhetoric and iconography through which medical missionaries transmitted to the West an image of China as sick or diseased.

In 1739 China’s emperor authorized the publication of a medical text that included images of children with .

In 1739 China’s emperor authorized the publication of a medical text that included images of children with smallpox to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Those images made their way to Europe, where they were interpreted as indicative of the ill health and medical backwardness of the Chinese.

Nationalistic history tends to swing back and forth between pride and humiliation The formation of this stigma constitutes the central theme of Heinrich’s book

Nationalistic history tends to swing back and forth between pride and humiliation. In one mode, it fosters solidarity among a varied populace by tracing the lineage of a nation to a single glorious tradition that has persisted, unaltered and continuous, to the present. The formation of this stigma constitutes the central theme of Heinrich’s book. Jin Anqing 金安清. (1997).

If China’s pathological condition has hitherto been posed merely as a. .

If China’s pathological condition has hitherto been posed merely as a metaphor of political weakness following the external incursions of foreign imperialism after 1839 and the internal mid-century rebellions that forced military and political d.For Heinrich, the association of China and sickness was both concrete and visual. Yet overall, the effect of the book is remarkable, and The Afterlife of Images achieves its larger goals of pushing analysis of images to the forefront of the historical agenda, challenging us to look beyond written sources for the origins of the discourse of China’s pathology. Electronic reference.

Series Body, Commodity, Text. Duke University Press Books . The Afterlife of Images. Translating the Pathological Body between China and the West. In 1739 China’s emperor authorized the publication of a medical text that included images of children with smallpox to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

Larissa N. Heinrich, The Afterlife of Images: Translating the Pathological Body between China and the West. Pingyi Chu. Published: 1 June 2010. by Springer Science and Business Media LLC. in East Asian Science, Technology and Society: an International Journal. East Asian Science, Technology and Society: an International Journal, Volume 4, pp 355-357; doi:10. Keywords: Larissa, Heinrich, afterlife, China, images, West, Translating, Pathological Body.

In Chinese Surplus Ari Larissa Heinrich examines transnational Chinese aesthetic production to demonstrate how representations of the medically commodified body can illuminate the effects of biopolitical violence an.

In Chinese Surplus Ari Larissa Heinrich examines transnational Chinese aesthetic production to demonstrate how representations of the medically commodified body can illuminate the effects of biopolitical violence and postcolonialism in contemporary life.

Chicago Distribution Center. Eric Karchmer, and Erich Karchmer. In the Name of the Public: Environmental Protest and the Changing Landscape of Popular Contention in China. Steinhardt et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

In 1739 China's emperor authorized the publication of a medical text that included images of children with smallpox to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease

In 1739 China's emperor authorized the publication of a medical text that included images of children with smallpox to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

In 1739 China’s emperor authorized the publication of a medical text that included images of children with smallpox to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Those images made their way to Europe, where they were interpreted as indicative of the ill health and medical backwardness of the Chinese. In the mid-nineteenth century, the celebrated Cantonese painter Lam Qua collaborated with the American medical missionary Peter Parker in the creation of portraits of Chinese patients with disfiguring pathologies, rendered both before and after surgery. Europeans saw those portraits as evidence of Western medical prowess. Within China, the visual idiom that the paintings established influenced the development of medical photography. In The Afterlife of Images, Ari Larissa Heinrich investigates the creation and circulation of Western medical discourses that linked ideas about disease to Chinese identity beginning in the eighteenth century.

Combining literary studies, the history of science, and visual culture studies, Heinrich analyzes the rhetoric and iconography through which medical missionaries transmitted to the West an image of China as “sick” or “diseased.” He also examines the absorption of that image back into China through missionary activity, through the earliest translations of Western medical texts into Chinese, and even through the literature of Chinese nationalism. Heinrich argues that over time “scientific” Western representations of the Chinese body and culture accumulated a host of secondary meanings, taking on an afterlife with lasting consequences for conceptions of Chinese identity in China and beyond its borders.