» » The Origin of the Second Amendment: A Documentary History of the Bill of Rights in Commentaries on Liberty, Free Government & an Armed Populace 1787-1792

Download The Origin of the Second Amendment: A Documentary History of the Bill of Rights in Commentaries on Liberty, Free Government & an Armed Populace 1787-1792 fb2

by David E. Young
Download The Origin of the Second Amendment: A Documentary History of the Bill of Rights in Commentaries on Liberty, Free Government & an Armed Populace 1787-1792 fb2
Law
  • Author:
    David E. Young
  • ISBN:
    0962366439
  • ISBN13:
    978-0962366437
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Golden Oak Books; 2 edition (May 1, 1995)
  • Pages:
    838 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Law
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1131 kb
  • ePUB format
    1806 kb
  • DJVU format
    1962 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    452
  • Formats:
    docx rtf azw doc


It was a useful resource on the background of the Second Amendment.

It was a useful resource on the background of the Second Amendment. Andrew Lanz rated it really liked it May 21, 2014. P. Es marked it as to-read Oct 15, 2007. David Speakman added it May 24, 2010. Bigtoe416 added it Feb 19, 2012. Kris Miller marked it as to-read Jul 17, 2013.

The Founders' Second Amendment: Origins of the Right to Bear Arms (Independent Studies in Political Economy). That would only happen if a bill of rights was addded to the US Constitution similar to the states' bill of rights to protect individuals from government infringement of peoples' rights. Read the book and learn about Mason Triad.

May 4, 2011 History. The origin of the Second Amendment. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The origin of the Second Amendment from your list? The origin of the Second Amendment.

i do no longer accept as true with them however the clarification why they are saying that's the framers of the form additionally wrote different issues alongside with books and articles that theoretically could desire to be (mis)construed to intend that the clarification they positioned the terrific to undergo palms interior the form became so as that if the government overstepped.

The collection is indexed

The collection is indexed. There are three appendices: the first contains the complete text of all American state bills of rights in effect in 1789; the next compares the Second Amendment to the related provisions from the various state ratifying conventions proposed bills of rights and the existing state bills of rights; the third provides information regarding popular support for the Constitution and Bill of Rights during. the Ratification Era. This volume is recognized as authoritative by . ORIGIN was cited over one-hundred times by the .

Preamble to the Bill of Rights. Congress of the United States. Amendment 2 - The Right to Bear Arms. begun and held at the City of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine.

View the table of contents. The Origin of the Second Amendment is printed on acid free paper. Hardcover copies have a sewn library binding. Supreme Court Heller Case. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals' decision in the . v Emerson case.

Ontonagon: Golden Oak Books, 1995. Rights and reuse information. The Skeptoid weekly science podcast is a free public service from Skeptoid Media, a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit. This show is made possible by financial support from listeners like you. If you like this programming, please become a member.

The Bill of Rights-the first ten amendments to the . Influence of the Magna Carta In 1787, at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Mason remarked that he wished the plan had been prefaced by a Bill of Rights. Constitution protecting the rights of . citizens-were ratified on December 15, 1791. Influence of the Magna Carta. The roots of the Bill of Rights lie deep in Anglo-American history. In 1215 England’s King John, under pressure from rebellious barons, put his seal to Magna Carta, which protected subjects against royal abuses of power. In 1787, at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Mason remarked that he wished the plan had been prefaced by a Bill of Rights. Elbridge Gerry moved for the appointment of a committee to prepare such a bill, but the delegates, without debate, defeated the motion.

Book on the origin of the second amendment. 1787-1792 second edition edited by David E. Young

Kajikus
Researched the 2nd Amendment in depth as a law student. Found most of these sources the hard way, searching archives and microfiche. This is a wonderfully convenient collection -- all footwork done. Highly recommend!
Kulabandis
Awesome. Contains all the primary source material law reviews cite to on 2A.
Ttexav
Good book
Windbearer
Excellent book that is accurately described on the webpage.
Dibei
Excellent service and turnaround time! Would definitely deal with this seller again!
Jerdodov
This is a tour de force in revealing the intentions of the founders as they struggled to come up with a Bill of Rights. It dispels many of the knee jerk notions of anti 2nd Amendment writers as the founders clearly knew the dangers of an oppressive government and took measures to allow the people some resources in the event that history repeated itself. An outstanding work that should be in the library of every Constitutionalist.
Jockahougu
The book reprints approximately 500 documents from the period surrounding the introduction and ratification of the Second Amendment. Included are newspaper articles, pamphlets, letters to the editor, debates from the federal Constitutional convention, debates from the state ratifying conventions, and Congressional debates.

Author David Young has brought together, for the first time, all of the original source material regarding what the Second Amendment meant to the nation which enacted it. The book opens in the summer of 1787 with the federal Constitutional Convention debating Congressional powers regarding the militia.

One of the final major documents of the book is a January 29, 1791 article in the Independent Gazetteer (a Philadelphia newspaper), in which the author, who identifies himself only as "A Farmer" warns: "Under every government the dernier [last] resort of the people, is an appeal to the sword; whether to defend themselves against the open attacks of a foreign enemy, or to check the insidious encroachments of domestic foes."

In between the first and last documents are a treasure trove of American history. Leafing through these pages, you encounter the great men who founded our Republic, and whose words speak to us today. Wrote Tench Coxe, James Madison's friend, in the Feb. 20, 1778 Freeman's Journal: "Who are the militia? are they not our selves...Their swords, and ever other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birthright of an American."

Hear Patrick Henry thundering from the June 5, 1788 Virginia ratifying convention: "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force you are inevitably ruined."

The men who speak to us through The Origin of the Second Amendment harbor no fear that government would interfere with "sporting" guns or hunting. They express the greatest apprehension of select, uniformed military forces, such as the standing army.

As The Origin of the Second Amendment makes unmistakably clear, the great object of the Second Amendment was to preserve liberty by ensuring that the American people would have in their individual hands the weapons with which to resist federal tyranny. The "well-regulated militia" included almost every able-bodied free male.

In addition to collecting an excellent selection of documents, author David Young also provides a good introductory essay summarizing the historical context of the debate and ratification of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, as well as an appendix giving the full text of all state Bill of Rights from 1787-89, and a very detailed index.

Besides supplying many hours of pleasure to anyone interested in American history, the book would also make an excellent gift to a local library
This is an excellent book.
Mr. Young devotes only a few pages of this thick volume to his own opinions, mostly just allowing those alive back in Constitution-making days to speak for themselves about the Second Amendment. And speak they do. Truthfully, I've never read the whole book straight through, but every time I crack it open to some random page I am amazed at the attitudes people had back then. How different from our modern sheep-like mentality, or the version of history we're fed by today's pop culture.
This book ought to be in every public library and on every citizen's bookshelf.