» » Strength in Weakness: Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women (Sacred Literature Series)

Download Strength in Weakness: Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women (Sacred Literature Series) fb2

by Gil Skidmore
Download Strength in Weakness: Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women (Sacred Literature Series) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Gil Skidmore
  • ISBN:
    0759105219
  • ISBN13:
    978-0759105218
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    AltaMira Press; 1st edition (October 14, 2003)
  • Pages:
    200 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1472 kb
  • ePUB format
    1847 kb
  • DJVU format
    1558 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    303
  • Formats:
    azw docx mobi lit


Quaker women in the eighteenth century were carrying on the faith and activity of their seventeenth-century .

Quaker women in the eighteenth century were carrying on the faith and activity of their seventeenth-century forebears, but as a group their lives and writings have been neglected in modern times by both Quaker and other historians. Gil Skidmore has chosen eight outstanding women whose writings she thinks are particularly poignant as well as relevant today: Grace Hall Chamber, Lydia Rawlinson Lancaster, Ruth Alcock Follows, Catheirne Payton Phillips, Sarah Tuke Grubb, Priscilla Hannah Gurney, Mary Alexander and Ann Crowley.

Strength in Weakness book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Strength in Weakness: Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Strength in Weakness: Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Strength in Weakness Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women Gil Skidmore. Sacred Literature Trust Series. Her publications include Elizabeth Fry: A Quaker Life (Yale University Press).

Quaker women in the eighteenth century were carrying on the faith and activity of their seventeenth-century forebears . Gil Skidmore brings together a rich array of letters, spiritual autobiographies, journals, and memoirs to put the lives and concerns of these women into context.

Sixth Month: Strength in Weakness: Writings by Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women. Walnut Creek CA: Altamira Press, published in cooperation with the International Sacred Literature Trust. 2003; p. 90. Seventh Month: Ann Dowcra.

Skidmore, Gil, Strength in weakness : writings of eighteenth-century Quaker women (Altamira Press, 2003). Booy, David, Autobiographical writings by early Quaker women (Ashgate, 2004). Garman, Mary and others, Hidden in plain sight : Quaker women's writings 1650-1700 (Pendle Hill Publications, 1996).

Her first book, drawing on that time . She was an early advocate of women’s suffrage; in 1869 she published The Missing Law; or, Woman’s Birthright. Strength in weakness: writings of eighteenth-century Quaker women.

Her first book, drawing on that time, was Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, and her most famous work, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, bases its argument largely around education in its widest sense. Quaker views on women had from the beginning tended towards equality, with women allowed to minister.

Magistrates of the Sacred will become the definitive study of church-state relations in colonial Spanish America, and, because of its comparative . style, and its presentation of the people who lived in eighteenth-century New Spain.

Magistrates of the Sacred will become the definitive study of church-state relations in colonial Spanish America, and, because of its comparative implications, it will also be of great interest to students of all regions of colonial America. Ramón A. Gutiérrez, University of California, San Diego.

Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women. More from this Author Books from this Series. Elizabeth Fry. A Quaker Life. The Book of the Perfect Life. Theologia Deutsch-Theologia Germanica.

Quaker women in the eighteenth century were carrying on the faith and activity of their seventeenth-century forebears, but as a group their lives and writings have been neglected in modern times by both Quaker and other historians. Gil Skidmore, who is very well qualified to compile a selection of the writings of these Quaker women, has written an engaging introduction to their lives and times, and she brings together a rich array of letters, spiritual autobiographies, journals and memoirs. In her Introduction, Gil Skidmore puts the lives and concerns of these women into context and gives detailed biographies of each author. She shows the links that existed between them personally and the differences in their thought, expression and experience. In broader terms, she illustrates how the writings of these women are relevant to the development of Quakerism up to the present. Gil Skidmore has chosen eight outstanding women whose writings she thinks are particularly poignant as well as relevant today: Grace Hall Chamber, Lydia Rawlinson Lancaster, Ruth Alcock Follows, Catherine Payton Phillips, Sarah Tuke Grubb, Priscilla Hannah Gurney, Mary Alexander, and Ann Crowley. As she writes in her Introduction:"I decided on these eight women partly because between them their lives span the century and partly because they have interesting and, I think, helpful things to say to the modern reader. The group also illustrates the personal links which existed between travelling ministers and between Quaker women in the eighteenth century. The network of encouragement and support built up through women's meetings and women travelling together as companions in the ministry, as well as the hospitality offered in one another's homes, contributed much to the continuation of Quakerism in the eighteenth century as a vital force. Their influence has been a well-kept secret for too long."