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by Carol Stabile
Download Prime Time Animation: Television Animation and American Culture fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Carol Stabile
  • ISBN:
    0415283264
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415283267
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge (April 20, 2003)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1595 kb
  • ePUB format
    1819 kb
  • DJVU format
    1873 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    852
  • Formats:
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This fascinating book explores the landscape of television animation, from Bedrock to Springfield, and beyond. In September 1960 a television show emerged from the mists of prehistoric time to take its place as the mother of all animated sitcoms.

This fascinating book explores the landscape of television animation, from Bedrock to Springfield, and beyond. The Flintstones spawned dozens of imitations, just as, two decades later, The Simpsons sparked a renaissance of primetime animation.

Prime time animation. PRIME TIME ANIMATION An overview Carol A. Stabile and Mark Harrison

Prime time animation. The Flintstones spawned dozens of imitations, just as, two decades later, The Simpsons sparked a renaissance of prime time animation. Stabile and Mark Harrison. U R I N G I T S F I V E - Y E A R R U N ( 1 9 9 2 – 9 7 ), B E AV I S A N D B U T T - H E A D became the focus of a number of controversies over the effects of television on viewers: from accusations that the program caused a.

Prime Time Animation book.

Start reading Prime Time Animation on your Kindle in under a minute. In September 1960 a television show emerged from the mists of prehistoric time to take its place as the mother of all animated sitcoms

Start reading Prime Time Animation on your Kindle in under a minute. The essays in this volume critically survey the landscape of television animation, from Bedrock to Springfield and beyond.

This fascinating book explores the landscape of television animation, from Bedrock to Springfield, and beyond

This fascinating book explores the landscape of television animation, from Bedrock to Springfield, and beyond. Table of Contents Acknowledgements List of Images Introduction - Prime Time Animation: An Overview Carol A. Stabile and Mark Harrison Part 1: Institutions: 1. 'Smarter than the Average Art Form': Animation in the Television Era Paul Wells 2. The Great Saturday Morning Exile: Scheduling Cartoons on Television's Periphery in the 1960s Jason Mittell 3. Re-Drawing the Bottom Line Allen.

Animation and America (2002); Carol Stabile & Mark Harrison’s anthology Prime Time Animation: Television Animation and the American culture (2003); Heather Hendershot’s Nickelodeon Nation (2004), and many others.

They are now recognized as a rich field for cultural analysis, as it is clear by the recent publication of books such as Paul Wells’ Animation and America (2002); Carol Stabile & Mark Harrison’s anthology Prime Time Animation: Television Animation and the American culture (2003); Heather Hendershot’s Nickelodeon Nation (2004), and many others. The main objective is to explore the dilemmas in American culture that animated shorts as a genre might be addressing.

Television animation developed from the success of animated movies in the first half of the 20th century. The state of animation changed dramatically in the three decades starting with the post-World War II proliferation of television. While studios gave up on the big-budget theatrical short cartoons that thrived in the 1930s and 1940s, new television animation studios would thrive based on the economy and volume of their output

Adult animation, adult cartoon or mature animation, is any type of animated motion work that is mainly targeted towards adults and older adolescents, as. .Prime Time Animation: Television Animation and American Culture.

Adult animation, adult cartoon or mature animation, is any type of animated motion work that is mainly targeted towards adults and older adolescents, as opposed to children or all-ages audiences.

In September 1960 a television show emerged from the mists of prehistoric time to take its place as the mother of all animated sitcoms. The Flintstones spawned dozens of imitations, just as, two decades later, The Simpsons sparked a renaissance of primetime animation. This fascinating book explores the landscape of television animation, from Bedrock to Springfield, and beyond.The contributors critically examine the key issues and questions, including: How do we explain the animation explosion of the 1960s? Why did it take nearly twenty years following the cancellation of The Flintstones for animation to find its feet again as primetime fare? In addressing these questions, as well as many others, essays examine the relation between earlier, made-for-cinema animated production (such as the Warner Looney Toons shorts) and television-based animation; the role of animation in the economies of broadcast and cable television; and the links between animation production and brand image. Contributors also examine specific programmes like The Powerpuff Girls, Daria, Ren and Stimpy and South Park from the perspective of fans, exploring fan cybercommunities, investigating how ideas of 'class' and 'taste' apply to recent TV animation, and addressing themes such as irony, alienation, and representations of the family.