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by Miriam Joyce
Download The Sultanate of Oman: A Twentieth Century History (Contributions to the Study of Mass) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Miriam Joyce
  • ISBN:
    0275952223
  • ISBN13:
    978-0275952228
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Praeger (August 15, 1995)
  • Pages:
    152 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1343 kb
  • ePUB format
    1615 kb
  • DJVU format
    1898 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    489
  • Formats:
    doc lrf txt azw


The Sultanate of Oman has six chapters.

The Sultanate of Oman has six chapters. First, while claiming to be a study of Oman, it deals almost exclusively with Muscat, a fact attributable to a reliance on Western archives to the exclusion of even major Arabic sources, such as Muhammad bin & alSalimi's Nahdat al-A'yan. 1 Second, the coverage of events is extremely uneven. The author's main concern is to discuss events and issues largely ignored in previous works on Oman.

The Sultanate of Oman book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Sultanate of Oman: A Twentieth Century History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

book by Miriam Joyce.

Volume 30, Issue 1. July 1996, p. 107. The Sultanate of Oman: A Twentieth Century History, by Miriam Joyce. 152 pages, map, notes, bibliography, index. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1995. W. Lynn Rigsbee (a1). Recommend this journal.

The Sultanate of Oman. a twentieth century history. Published 1995 by Praeger in Westport, Conn. There's no description for this book yet. Includes bibliographical references and index.

This book left me inspired and something horrified and embarrassed

contribution to the immense labor of understanding some of the worst experiences humankind has ever ha. - - George Scialabba, Boston Globe. There is much that is excellent in Humanity, especially Glover's lucid summary of the monstrosities of ble. This book left me inspired and something horrified and embarrassed. I originally thought this book would be somewhat demanding with lots of academic jargon but I was immediately hooked.

A Study of History is a 12-volume universal history by the British historian Arnold J. Toynbee, published in 1934–61. It received enormous popular attention but according to historian Richard J. Evans, "enjoyed only a brief vogue before disappearing into the obscurity in which it has languished.

Le Sultanat d’Oman: La question de Mascate (The Sultanate of Oman: the . of the sultanate and a discussion of European influence in Oman from the 16th century onward. London: Forgotten Books, 2013).

Le Sultanat d’Oman: La question de Mascate (The Sultanate of Oman: the question of Muscat) is an analysis of treaties and other agreements between France, Great Britain, and Oman concerning commerce in the Indian Ocean from the mid-19th century until the time of writing on the eve of World War I. The diplomatic study is preceded by a political history of the sultanate and a discussion of European influence in Oman from the 16th century onward.

Oman is the oldest independent state in the Arab world. A succession crisis in 1856, however, saw the Omani Empire divided into the Sultanate of Oman and Muscat and the Sultanate of Zanzibar. By the 18th century, the Omani Empire stretched from present day Oman down the east coast of Africa. A new era began in 1970 when Sultan Qaboos bin Said changed the name of the country from the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman to simply Oman. In 1891, Oman and Muscat became a British Protectorate. For much of this period, the Sultan controlled the coast around Muscat while the Imam governed the interior from Nizwa.

This study is based on extensive research in British sources and includes material from archives in the United States. The last chapter, which covers the period from 1970, is based on Omani newspapers and interviews with Omani officials conducted in 1994. Throughout the 20th century, Omani rulers were confronted with rebellious tribes and threatened by movements originating outside the sultanate, including Wahhabism, Arab nationalism, and communism. The discovery of oil in the 1960s did not free the Omani people from poverty or seclusion. The Sultan's subjects were only liberated in 1970, when a coup d'etat led by Sayyid Qaboos bin Said, enabled Oman to build a modern infrastructure, join the Arab World and the international community.