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by Dwijendra Narayan Jha
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Dwijendra Narayan Jha
  • ISBN:
    184553459X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1845534592
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (August 21, 2014)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
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    1157 kb
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Recent years have seen the emergence of a virulent version of Hindu nationalism and fundamentalism in India under the banner of Hindutva.

Recent years have seen the emergence of a virulent version of Hindu nationalism and fundamentalism in India under the banner of Hindutva. This xenophobic movement has obfuscated and mystified the notion of Hindu identity and reinforced its stereotypes. Its arguments range from the patently unscientific - humankind was created in India.

Cambridge Core - Buddhism and Eastern Religions - Rethinking Hindu Identity - by Dwijendra Narayan Jh. Rethinking Hindu Identity. Dwijendra Narayan Jha. Publisher: Acumen Publishing. Online publication date: June 2014. Print publication year: 2009. Online ISBN: 9781845537180. Subjects: Buddhism and Eastern Religions, Religion. Series: Religion in Culture: Studies in Social Contest and Construction.

Rethinking Hindu Identity' offers a corrective based on a deep and detailed reading of Indian history. by Dwijendra Narayan Jha. Religion in Culture. Written in a riveting style, this study provides a fresh history of Hinduism - its practices, its beliefs, its differences and inconsistencies, and its own myths about itself. Along the way, the book systematically demolishes the arguments of Hindu fundamentalism and nationalism, revealing how the real history of Hinduism is much more complex.

Request PDF On Jun 1, 2010, Jeffery D. Long and others published Rethinking Hindu Identity - By D. N. Jha . Structural transformation of Indian society on the one hand, and changes in culture, values and norms on the other, signify a semblance of modernization in India.

Structural transformation of Indian society on the one hand, and changes in culture, values and norms on the other, signify a semblance of modernization in India. In domains like economy, politics, education, and media, it is not difficult to work out different phases of change and development. One can see correspondence in different phases relating to these basic structural and cultural domains.

Dwijendra Narayan Jha is an Indian historian, specialising in ancient and medieval India. Jha completed his BA (Hons. in History at Presidency College of the University of Calcutta and then his MA in History at Patna University where he was a student of Professor .

Rethinking Religion book. Start by marking Rethinking Religion: Connecting Cognition and Culture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Rethinking Hindu Identity. Rethinking Hindu Identity' offers a corrective based on a deep and detailed reading of Indian history. Studies in Social Contest and Construction. Routledge.

How can we define religion and culture in a way that is useful to the study of world politics? It is important to sketch .

How can we define religion and culture in a way that is useful to the study of world politics? It is important to sketch each term separately before bringing them back together to form a composite picture. We begin with religion, a category that scholars and policymakers once considered irrelevant to the study of IR because it was not believed to be important for the economic and security interests of modern states and their citizens. Yet, many scholars now hold that religion cannot be ignored. Therefore, with a ‘both/and’ logic in mind, we consider comparative examples of religio-cultural identity in world politics that emphasise conflict and cooperation respectively.

Jha ably demonstrates that these claims are stereotypes by means of copious historical evidence that contradicts them. It would appear that essentialism is only problematic if practiced by Hindu nationalists, but just fine if practiced by its critics. Jha’s argument is undermined, however, by his clear bias in the extreme opposite direction of Hindu nationalism, seeming at times to drift into a strident anti-Hinduism. He claims, for example, to oppose essentialist definitions of Hinduism.

Recent years have seen the emergence of a virulent version of Hindu nationalism and fundamentalism in India under the banner of Hindutva. This xenophobic movement has obfuscated and mystified the notion of Hindu identity and reinforced its stereotypes. Its arguments range from the patently unscientific - humankind was created in India, as was the first civilisation - to historical whitewash: Hinduism has continued in one, unchanged form for 5000 years; Hinduism has always been a tolerant faith. 'Rethinking Hindu Identity' offers a corrective based on a deep and detailed reading of Indian history. Written in a riveting style, this study provides a fresh history of Hinduism - its practices, its beliefs, its differences and inconsistencies, and its own myths about itself. Along the way, the book systematically demolishes the arguments of Hindu fundamentalism and nationalism, revealing how the real history of Hinduism is much more complex.