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by Frederick E Hoxie,Jay T. Nelson
Download Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country: The Native American Perspective fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Frederick E Hoxie,Jay T. Nelson
  • ISBN:
    0252074858
  • ISBN13:
    978-0252074851
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Illinois Press (November 5, 2007)
  • Pages:
    376 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1359 kb
  • ePUB format
    1978 kb
  • DJVU format
    1382 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    412
  • Formats:
    rtf lrf doc mobi


The essays in this collection, then, represent an eclectic swath of topics and sources. An excellent resource for both serious students and scholars of the American West. - Journal of Illinois History.

Rich stories of Native Americans, travelers, ranchers, Columbia River fur traders, teachers, and missionaries-often in conflict with each other-illustrate complex interactions between settlers and tribal people.

Frederick E. Hoxie pt. 1: The Indian country. 2: Crossing the Indian country. The arrival of horses accelerates trade and cultural change A brilliant plan for living : creators A brilliant plan for living : gifts A brilliant plan for living : men and women A vast network of partners pt.

Lewis & Clark and the Indian Country: The Native American Perspective by Frederick E. Hoxie and Jay T. Nelson. Indiana Magazine of History.

Based on an exhibition that opened in Oct. 2004 at the Newberry Library, Chicago, Ill. Includes bibliographical references and index. Introduction : What can we learn from a bicentennial? /. Frederick E. Hoxie - pt. The arrival of horses accelerates trade and cultural change - A brilliant plan for living : creators - A brilliant plan for living : gifts - A brilliant plan for living : men and women - A vast network of partners - pt. What did the Americans know? -.

Books for adult readers Hoxie, Frederick E. & Jay T. This book is authored by the curator of the Newberry Library exhibit and the traveling exhibition for libraries. Ed. Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country: The Native American Perspective (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2008). The Lewis & Clark Trail: American Landscapes. Evanston, IL: Quiet Light Publishing, 2004). Richard Mack’s photographs are featured as the background images for the traveling exhibition. Nelson presen. More). 1. View via Publisher. Tonto's Revenge: Reflections on American Indian Culture and Policy.

In 2001, Hoxie held a meeting with four American Indian consultants to consider an exhibition on Lewis and Clark's relation-ship with Indians (9-10).

Jay T. Nelson is a program assistant at the D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History, the Newberry Library. Country of Publication. Jay T.

Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country broadens the scope of conventional study of the Lewis and Clark expedition to include Native American perspectives. Frederick E. Hoxie and Jay T. Nelson present the expedition’s long-term impact on the “Indian Country” and its residents through compelling interviews conducted with Native Americans over the past two centuries, secondary literature, Lewis and Clark travel journals, and other primary sources from the Newberry Library’s exhibit Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country. Rich stories of Native Americans, travelers, ranchers, Columbia River fur traders, teachers, and missionaries—often in conflict with each other--illustrate complex interactions between settlers and tribal people. Environmental protection issues and the preservation of Native language, education, and culture dominate late twentieth-century discussions, while early accounts document important Native American alliances with Lewis and Clark. In widening the reader’s interpretive lens to include many perspectives, this collection reaches beyond individual achievement to appreciate America’s plural past.


Tojahn
Great book for getting the other side of the story. Most literature referencing the Lewis and Clark expedition is from the perspective of colonialism. This book uncovers the Native American perspective.
Xlisiahal
"Lewis & Clark and the Indian Country”: The Native American Perspective edited by Frederick E. Hoxie and Jay T. Nelson

Being a “perspective”, this work naturally includes insights to be contemplated and bias to be criticized. The insights in this book are ample, important, thought-provoking, and deserve plenty of contemplation. The bias is chiefly the age-old “White equals Bad, Red equals Noble” bigotry and hypocrisy that has characterized the writings of Indians and their allies forever. That is to say it is “old news” and should be set aside in order to glean the most from the insights.

I’m certain the reader will agree that the editors have done an admirable job of cutting through the mythology of the Lewis & Clark expedition. In doing so, they have brought the reader to a vantage point that puts the expedition and its’ impact into “3-D”, so to speak. It’s like they’ve “IMAX’ed” the Corps of Discovery and its’ place in the real America of 1803-06. But I don’t want to spoil the fun… except, perhaps, to say this…

The editors seem to have undergone an epiphany of sorts – a realization of the unseen impact Red/White contact then, and since and now. They seem to sense that, in spite of its’ twisted, twining path over the passed century, the Life of the native peoples is still in them. They are still Themselves. The 21st chapter, titled “Language Preservation” recognizes Language as the soul of a People (“culture”, if you will) and comes closest to articulating that epiphany. In fact, the reader might do well to read that chapter first and then go back and read the book through. And, in fact, White readers might do very well to ponder whether all American citizens need to achieve a similar epiphany about our lives too. Our national government is doing many of the same things to all of us that it did to indigenous Americans in the 1900s, especially with regards to our children.