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by David M. Knipe
Download Vedic Voices: Intimate Narratives of a Living Andhra Tradition fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    David M. Knipe
  • ISBN:
    0199397686
  • ISBN13:
    978-0199397686
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2015)
  • Pages:
    368 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1250 kb
  • ePUB format
    1223 kb
  • DJVU format
    1996 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    684
  • Formats:
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In Vedic Voices, David M. Knipe offers for the first time, an opportunity for them to speak about their lives, ancestral lineages, personal choices . David M. Knipe is a historian of religions focusing on Hinduism and Vedic studies.

In Vedic Voices, David M. Knipe offers for the first time, an opportunity for them to speak about their lives, ancestral lineages, personal choices as pandits, wives, children, and ways of coping with an avalanche of changes in modern India. He presents a study of four generations of ten families, from those born at the outset of the twentieth century down to their great-grandsons who are just beginning, at the age of seven, the task of memorizing their Veda, the Taittiriya Samhita, a feat that will require eight to twelve years of daily recitations. Knipe offers for the first time, an opportunity for them to speak about their lives, ancestral lineages, personal choices as pandits, wives, children, and ways of coping with an avalanche of changes in modern India

In Vedic Voices, David M.

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For countless generations families have lived in isolated communities in the. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Four generations of ten families in the Godavari Delta of coastal Andhra speak about their lives; ancestral lineages; decisions as Yajur Veda pandits, wives, and children; and ways of coping with an avalanche of changes in modern India. They are virtually unrecognized survivors of a 3,700-year-old oral tradition, the last in India who simultaneously recite and teach their Taittiriya texts and perform according to Vedic tradition the ancient animal and soma sacrifices, sometimes with sixteen priests for forty consecutive days.

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according to Vedic tradition. In Vedic Voices, David M. Knipe offers for the first time

book by David M. Knipe. For countless generations families have lived in isolated communities in the Godavari Delta of coastal Andhra Pradesh, learning and reciting their legacy of Vedas, performing daily offerings and occasional sacrifices. They are the virtually unrecognized survivors of a 3,700-year-old heritage, the last in India who perform the ancient animal and soma sacrifices according to Vedic tradition.

Published: 1 January 2016. by American Oriental Society. in Journal of the American Oriental Society. Journal of the American Oriental Society, Volume 136; doi:10.

With Knipe s book, personal narratives cohere into a rich portrait of the struggle to preserve Vedic heritage in modern .

With Knipe s book, personal narratives cohere into a rich portrait of the struggle to preserve Vedic heritage in modern Indian society, and a vibrant tradition comes into bold relief. In bearing witness to the diverse experiences of these multi-generational families, Vedic Voices offers a corrective to the perception that Vedic traditions have vanished entirely from the subcontinent or else survive only as scattered relics without relevance to the modern religious landscape.

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For countless generations families have lived in isolated communities in the Godavari Delta of coastal Andhra Pradesh, learning and reciting their legacy of Vedas, performing daily offerings and occasional sacrifices. They are the virtually unrecognized survivors of a 3,700-year-old heritage, the last in India who perform the ancient animal and soma sacrifices according to Vedic tradition. In Vedic Voices, David M. Knipe offers for the first time, an opportunity for them to speak about their lives, ancestral lineages, personal choices as pandits, wives, children, and ways of coping with an avalanche of changes in modern India. He presents a study of four generations of ten families, from those born at the outset of the twentieth century down to their great-grandsons who are just beginning, at the age of seven, the task of memorizing their Veda, the Taittiriya Samhita, a feat that will require eight to twelve years of daily recitations. After successful examinations these young men will reside with the Veda family girls they married as children years before, take their places in the oral transmission of a three-thousand-year Vedic heritage, teach the Taittiriya collection of texts to their own sons, and undertake with their wives the major and minor sacrifices performed by their ancestors for some three millennia.Coastal Andhra, famed for bountiful rice and coconut plantations, has received scant attention from historians of religion and anthropologists despite a wealth of cultural traditions. Vedic Voices describes in captivating prose the geography, cultural history, pilgrimage traditions, and celebrated persons of the region. Here unfolds a remarkable story of Vedic pandits and their wives, one scarcely known in India and not at all to the outside world.