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by Sara Dubow
Download Ourselves Unborn: A History of the Fetus in Modern America fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Sara Dubow
  • ISBN:
    0195323432
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195323436
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 28, 2010)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1341 kb
  • ePUB format
    1347 kb
  • DJVU format
    1460 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    709
  • Formats:
    txt lit lrf docx


PDF On Jan 1, 2012, Sophie Jones and others published Sara Dubow, Ourselves Unborn: A History of. .

through which the nation both creates and projects an image of itself. Dubow writes in the. introduction that ‘stories about fetuses express individual and collective beliefs about. individuality, motherhood, and American society’ (p. 9). For instance, the nineteenth-century.

Ourselves Unborn closes with the beginning of Barack Obama’s presidency, highlighting that the history of the modern foetus is far from over. The book nevertheless posits a vantage point from which modern America and its investment in the unborn can be retrospectively assessed. The analytical depth and thematic focus of the book’s later sections departs from the broad chronological sweep of the opening two chapters, which establish the 1870-1970 period as a historicising ground for contemporary reproductive debates. This approach is fascinating, but leaves the book feeling somewhat uneven.

Dubow's history of the fetus as symbol is a major addition to our history of politics, gender, the body, and reproduction in America. To understand American politics and culture since the nineteenth century requires grasping American's long standing interest in the unborn and the many uses of the concept of fetus. Dubow gives the unknowable 'unborn' a history, thus revealing that today's fetus is a construction that grew out of specific political circumstances. -Journal of American History.

Ourselves Unborn book. Ourselves Unborn argues that the meanings people attribute to the fetus are not based simply on biological fact or theological truth, but are in fact During the past several decades, the fetus has been diversely represented in political debates, medical textbooks and journals, personal memoirs and autobiographies, museum exhibits and mass media, and civil and criminal law.

Home Browse Books Book details, Ourselves Unborn: A History of.The fetus is a familiar, contested, and provocative presence in American.

Home Browse Books Book details, Ourselves Unborn: A History of the Fetus i.Ourselves Unborn: A History of the Fetus in Modern America. In examining the contested history of fetal meanings, Sara Dubow brings a fresh perspective to these vital debates. The fetus is a familiar, contested, and provocative presence in American culture and politics.

Ourselves Unborn argues that the meanings people attribute to the fetus are not based simply on biological fact or.

Ourselves Unborn argues that the meanings people attribute to the fetus are not based simply on biological fact or theological truth, but are in fact strongly influenced by competing definitions of personhood and identity, beliefs about knowledge and authority, and assumptions about gender roles and sexuality.

Cases from Ourselves Unborn. 0Pages: 2year: 17/18.

Ourselves Unborn: A History of the Fetus in Modern America. Cases from Ourselves Unborn.

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During the past several decades, the fetus has been diversely represented in political debates, medical textbooks and journals, personal memoirs and autobiographies, museum exhibits and mass media, and civil and criminal law. Ourselves Unborn argues that the meanings people attribute to the fetus are not based simply on biological fact or theological truth, but are in fact strongly influenced by competing definitions of personhood and identity, beliefs about knowledge and authority, and assumptions about gender roles and sexuality. In addition, these meanings can be shaped by dramatic historical change: over the course of the twentieth century, medical and technological changes made fetal development more comprehensible, while political and social changes made the fetus a subject of public controversy. Moreover, since the late nineteenth century, questions about how fetal life develops and should be valued have frequently intersected with debates about the authority of science and religion, and the relationship between the individual and society. In examining the contested history of fetal meanings, Sara Dubow brings a fresh perspective to these vital debates.