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by Rachel Devlin
Download Relative Intimacy: Fathers, Adolescent Daughters, and Postwar American Culture (Gender and American Culture) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Rachel Devlin
  • ISBN:
    0807856053
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807856055
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (June 13, 2005)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1513 kb
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    1390 kb
  • DJVU format
    1733 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    379
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Devlin argues that during the postwar era, an increasingly powerful psychoanalytic paradigm centered on Oedipal relations between fathers and daughters shaped . Series: Gender and American Culture.

Devlin argues that during the postwar era, an increasingly powerful psychoanalytic paradigm centered on Oedipal relations between fathers and daughters shaped adult responses to a whole range of female adolescent behaviors and experiences. This is an impressive work. The analysis is sophisticated, the questions well framed. Beth Bailey, Temple University, author of Sex in the Heartland: Politics, Culture, and the Sexual Revolution. From the Inside Flap.

Relative Intimacy: Fathers, Adolescent Daughters, and Postwar American Culture (Gender and American Culture). Download (pdf, . 3 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

As Devlin demonstrates, the pervasiveness of depictions of father-adolescent daughter eroticism on all levels of culture raises questions about the extent of girls' independence in modern American society and the character o. .

As Devlin demonstrates, the pervasiveness of depictions of father-adolescent daughter eroticism on all levels of culture raises questions about the extent of girls' independence in modern American society and the character of fatherhood during America's fabled embrace of domesticity in the 1940s and 1950s. Celebrated as new consumers and condemned for their growing delinquencies, teenage girls emerged as one of the most visible segments of American society during and after World War II.

Devlin argues that in the postwar United States, a sexually charged father–daughter relationship was hardly a matter for concern.

A father could express his love for his daughter by paying the bills and giving approval to her purchases. Devlin argues that in the postwar United States, a sexually charged father–daughter relationship was hardly a matter for concern. A father could express his love for his daughter by paying the bills and giving approval to her purchases.

They believed that since fathers were away at war they were unable to be involved with there growing daughters .

They believed that since fathers were away at war they were unable to be involved with there growing daughters, these absent fathers led to a group of unruly young woman. A lack of emotional attachment between a father and daughter will be the spiral of an out of control young woman (Devlin) This book shows a vast amount of connections to the Sociology of sexualities, we can see that some of the topics in Devlin’s books that are covered are: Society dealing with gender specific development Girls becoming sexual beings and exploring.

Journal of American Studies. Your name Please enter your name.

Rachel Devlin argues that postwar culture fostered a father-daughter relationship characterized by new forms of psychological intimacy. The pervasiveness of depictions of father-adolescent daughter eroticism on all levels of culture raises questions about the extent of girls' independence and the character of fatherhood during the 40s and 50. (more).

Left History features articles from a variety of theoretical approaches; these include feminist, marxist, and postmodernist deliberations on topics such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, culture, the state, labour, th.

Left History features articles from a variety of theoretical approaches; these include feminist, marxist, and postmodernist deliberations on topics such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, culture, the state, labour, the environment, theory, and method. All other uses require permission.

Gender and American Culture (68)

Gender and American Culture (68). With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the subjects of urban and penal reform in ury New York.

Celebrated as new consumers and condemned for their growing delinquencies, teenage girls emerged as one of the most visible segments of American society during and after World War II. Contrary to the generally accepted view that teenagers grew more alienated from adults during this period, Rachel Devlin argues that postwar culture fostered a father-daughter relationship characterized by new forms of psychological intimacy and tinged with eroticism. According to Devlin, psychiatric professionals turned to the Oedipus complex during World War II to explain girls' delinquencies and antisocial acts. Fathers were encouraged to become actively involved in the clothing and makeup choices of their teenage daughters, thus domesticating and keeping under paternal authority their sexual maturation. In Broadway plays, girls' and women's magazines, and works of literature, fathers often appeared as governing figures in their daughters' sexual coming of age. It became the common sense of the era that adolescent girls were fundamentally motivated by their Oedipal needs, dependent upon paternal sexual approval, and interested in their fathers' romantic lives. As Devlin demonstrates, the pervasiveness of depictions of father-adolescent daughter eroticism on all levels of culture raises questions about the extent of girls' independence in modern American society and the character of fatherhood during America's fabled embrace of domesticity in the 1940s and 1950s.