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by Joel S. Panzer
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Joel S. Panzer
  • ISBN:
    0818907649
  • ISBN13:
    978-0818907647
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Alba House (October 16, 1996)
  • Pages:
    138 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1645 kb
  • ePUB format
    1322 kb
  • DJVU format
    1440 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    933
  • Formats:
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Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. Продавец:betterworldbooks (2029745)99,4% положительных отзывовСвязаться с продавцом. The Popes and Slavery by Joel S. Panzer (1996, Paperback).

Joel Panzer gives the original Latin with translations of major statements by popes regarding slavery for the last 400 .

Joel Panzer gives the original Latin with translations of major statements by popes regarding slavery for the last 400 years. So, for that the book is invaluable. His dishonesty, however, shows forth in his interpretation of those documents.

The Popes and Slavery book. This book reveals how the Church has in the past and still does speak up decisively to halt the infamous trade in human flesh.

By Joel S Panzer The substantial teaching against slavery that was provided by the Papal Magisterium rightly should give Catholics a great .

By Joel S Panzer The substantial teaching against slavery that was provided by the Papal Magisterium rightly should give Catholics a great sense of pride. The ChurchinHistory Information Centre. The Pope states that after being converted to the faith or promised baptism, many of the inhabitants were taken from their home and enslaved: They have deprived the natives of their property or turned it to their own use, and have subjected some of the inhabitants of said islands to perpetual slavery (subdiderunt perpetuae servituti), sold then to other persons and.

The ChurchinHistory Information Centre. The Popes and Slavery. There existed of course the practice of various types of slavery before the 15th century

The ChurchinHistory Information Centre. There existed of course the practice of various types of slavery before the 15th century. However, it was not until the 15th century, and with growing frequency from the 16th to the 19th centuries, that racial slavery as we know it became a major problem. It is this form of servitude that is called to mind when we think today of the institution of slavery, and is the type which was to prevail in parts of the New World for over four centuries. This brings us back to our initial question: When did the Church condemn this slavery?

The Popes and Slavery. POPES AND SLAVERY This book reveals how the Church has in the past and still does speak up decisively to halt the infamous trade in human flesh.

The Popes and Slavery. Saint Pauls/Alba House.

Source: Father Joel S. Panzer, The Popes and Slavery (Alba House, 1996), p. 101 Unfortunately a few American bishops misinterpreted this Bull as condemning only the slave trade and not slavery itself. Bishop John England of Charleston actually wrote several letters to the Secretary of State under President Van Buren explaining that the Pope, within In Supremo, did not condemn slavery but only the slave trade (Ibid. Source: Father Joel S. Panzer, The Popes and Slavery (Alba House, 1996), pp. 67-68 Catholics constituted approximately 2% of the southern white population

Joel S Panzer views "Sicut Dudum" as a significant condemnation of slavery, issued sixty years before the Europeans found the New . Joel S. Panzer's book, "The Popes and Slavery", Appendix B, Society of St. Paul, 1996

Joel S Panzer views "Sicut Dudum" as a significant condemnation of slavery, issued sixty years before the Europeans found the New World. Eugene tempered Sicut Dudum with another bull (15 September 1436) due to the complaints made by King Duarte of Portugal, that allowed the Portuguese to conquer any unconverted parts of the Canary Islands. Paul, 1996.

Joel S. Pope Eugene IV, Sicut Dudm, §4, Florence, 13 January 1435. That the World May Believe: The Development of Papal Social Thought on Aboriginal Rights, Chap. 2, "Alexander Vi and the bulls of Demarcation", . 5, Médiaspaul, 1992.

This book reveals how the Church has in the past and still does speak up decisively to halt the infamous trade in human flesh.

Precious
Panzer covers the topic of the papal bulls and pronouncements on slavery from the 1400s.

The bull Sicut Dudum in 1435 was the papal reaction to Canary islanders have been enslaved. The pope was outraged. He demanded that all who had been enslaved had to be restored to their liberty immediately or those who had caused the enslavement, or who owned slaves, or who bought and sold slaves, would incur excommunication. The pope calls the enslavement of natives "illicit and evil" (p 9).

This would be the first volley in a long and sad war, with greedy Catholics refusing to listen to the pope, just as many do today regarding abortion and other issues.

About a century later, in 1537, Sublimus Deus was published, which was intended as "the central pedagogical work against slavery" (p 17). It insisted that all the natives of America "are men and therefore capable of faith and salvation, they are not to be given into servitude" (p 22). Against the cries of many who believed the natives to merely brutes, the pope contended that they were fully human, and that they must never be enslaved.

In 1591, Pope Gregory issued yet another bull on the subject, Ci, Sicuti, which reiterated that all who bought, sold, captured, or owned slaves to be excommunicated from the Catholic church.

The main tenets of Sublimus Deus would never be altered in any way, and are in effect today. However, some leniency was allowed, not for slavery, but for a later form of punishment. Indentured servants who had essentially sold themselves into a kind of slavery for a limited time, perhaps in order to gain a ship's crossing to America, was allowed, as was the taking of prisoners in war. For limited time, the captured men could be put to work, under very strict circumstances that never lessened their dignity.

This is a fascinating book, well written and comprehensive. Another book book on the subject: The Spanish Origin of International Law.
Bloodhammer
Fr. Joel Panzer was in residence at our parish. The book is written just like he preaches
Rayli
Used as a sourcebook for documents by the Catholic Church on the slave trade, this is great. Fr. Joel Panzer gives the original Latin with translations of major statements by popes regarding slavery for the last 400 years. So, for that the book is invaluable. His dishonesty, however, shows forth in his interpretation of those documents. To take one example: Whereas he mentions the work of the Catholic priest, Bartolomeo de las Casas, in ending the enslavement of the indigenous peoples by the Spanish colonists, Fr. Panzer is completely silent about De las Casas' suggestion that Africans be used as slaves instead. Fr. Panzer is quite correct in pointing out the difference between slavery a la' indentured servitude and the slave trade PER SE. The former was not necessarily opposed by the Church, while the latter was indeed condemned. Fr. Panzer tries to nuance the primary sources he uses to favor the Catholic Church -- and, that is the weakness of his book. Get it if you want to have most of the original documents from the Roman Catholic Church on the subject. Just don't expect scholarship from Fr. Joel Panzer.
Corgustari
Did you know:

* That nearly sixty years before Columbus' discovery of the New World, in 1435, Pope Eugene IV condemned the enslavement of the natives of the Canary Islands by the Portugese? (Sicut Didum)(Whereas the Enlightened British were still enlaving Africans into the 18th Century.)

* That Alexander IV's division of the New World was not an imprimatur to conquer but was premised on the consent of the natives to the overlordship of European powers? (Ineffabilis et Summi Patris.)(Whereas the secular powers of Europe and North America continued to conquer native lands well into the 19th Century.)

* That Paul III affirmed the human rights of the natives of the New World in 1537?(Sublimis Deus)(Whereas there were European scientists and liberal thinkers who were still disputing the human rights of Africans, American Indians and other native peoples into the 20th Century, and in 1857, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney would infamously hold in the Dred Scott decision that the authors of the Constitution had viewed all blacks as "beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations, and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect..." (As a Catholic, Taney would have done better by following the teachings of Sublimis Deus rather than 19th Century racial science.))

* That Pope Paul III taught in 1537 that war could not be waged against a people simply because they were not Christian? (Altitudo Divini Consilii)(Whereas secular powers would use that claim to extend their power in Africa and North America for the next 400 years.)

* That popes in the 17th Century re-iterated their predecessors anti-slavery teachings? (Commissum Nobis)(Whereas, at the same time, the liberal European powers of England and Holland were taking over the slave trade.)

* That Pope Gregory XVI condemned slavery and the slave trade in 1839?(In Supremo)(Whereas, at the same time, Americans were contemplating extending slavery to new regions of the Western Hemisphere and had plotted returning Haiti to the slave-owners.)

* That Pope Leo XIII called for the ending of slavery in Africa in 1890? (Catholicae Ecclesiae)(Whereas, in a few short years, King Leopold of Belgium would turn central Africa into the "heard of darkness" that would be resolutely ignored by liberal Europe for over a decade.)

All of this may come as a surprise to those who have been taught through various forms of popular entertainment that somehow the Catholic Church bears for enabling or promoting the evils of the European conquest of the New World and the enslavement of Indians and Africans. For my part, I was surprised to find that Inter Caetera, by which Alexander VI purportedly divided up the New World between Portugal and Spain was not a license to conquer and exploit but was premised on the people of the New world freely chosing the Kings of Spain and Portugal as their sovereigns. (p. 13.)

Likewise, given the constant slur that Christianity was indifferent to or supportive of slavery, it is astounding to discover that sixty years before Columbus, the pope was ordering that natives of newly discovered lands be released from slavery.

The purpose of the "The Popes and Slavery" by Father Joel Panzer is to collect the primary material on the papal encyclicals and to provide some brief background material on the history, purpose and effect of the encyclicals. Father Panzer succeeds in his appointed task: this book is an excellent resource for primary source materials on the subject of papal teachings on slavery. I have often had to go to the internet to get copies of Sicut Dudum and I was not aware of a few of the other sources. The encyclicals and Instructions from the Vatican on particular circumstances involving slavery are collected in Latin and English in the appendix. The format is neatly put together and the commentary is easily accessible.

My criticism of the book is that it does not go far enough, which, admittedly, was the express intention of Father Panzer. Father Panzer advises the reader that he doesn't intend to discuss "just title servitude." "Just title servitude" is a form of servitude or slavery that arises from being properly convicted of a crime or being a soldier captured in battle. Father Panzer alludes to the concept, but apart from pointing out that "just title servitude" exists into the present day - as recently as 1949, the Geneva Convention permitted "the detaining power to utilize the labor of prisoners of war" (p. 3), Father Panzer does not spend much time discussing the theory of just title servitude.

Obviously, a reader or reviewer can't criticize an author for what he has not written, but in this case, the failure misses an opportunity to explain to readers immersed in the shallow narcissism of modernity just how revolutionary the papal precedents were. For example, several reviewers have sought to minimize the development of anti-slavery doctrine within Catholicism on the spurious grounds that the Church did not condemn slavery tout court until 1890 "when abolitionism had already succeeded in the Western world."

Unfortunately, this is the kind of ambiguity that needs an explanation. The Church has never condemned all forms of involuntary servitude, which is what is meant by "slavery," because the Church has never condemned "punishment." Incarceration in prison is a form of "involuntary servitude," a kind of slavery. This is a non-trivial point. In fact, it was only in 2012, that Vermont finally got rid of what most people would call "slavery" wherein persons held in Vermont prisons were forced to work, even though they had never been convicted of any crime:

"A man who claimed he was forced to do manual labor while detained pending trial can proceed with claims against the state of Vermont under the 13th Amendment, which prohibits slavery and involuntary servitude.

In an opinion on Friday, a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S.Circuit Court of Appeals found that a lower court wrongly denied Finbar McGarry a chance to argue that he was forced, against his will and under threat, to work in a prison laundry.

McGarry was a PhD student in chemistry at the University of Vermont at the time of his arrest in December 2008. Denied bail, he was jailed at the Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility in South Burlington, Vermont, pending trial on charges relating to a domestic disturbance.

For six weeks, McGarry said he was forced to work three days a week for up to 14 hours at a time washing other inmates' laundry at a pay of 25 cents an hour.

The work was hot, unsanitary and resulted in his getting an infection in his neck, McGarry said. If he refused to work, McGarry said prison officials threatened to send him to "the hole," where inmates were confined for 23 hours a day." (Thomson-Reuters News and Insights, August 3, 2012)

All of which tends to show that slavery is still a live and complicated issue in the 21st Century - over a century after Leo XIII condemned slavery! Although one reviewer believes that Leo's condemnation was unnecessary because "when abolitionism had already succeeded in the Western world," that reviewer is clearly mistaken. Not only hadn't the anti-slavery program succeeded in the "Western World," it hadn't succeeded in Vermont!

Moreover, those who criticize Father Panzer's slim and informative book because in their view the Catholic Church was a moral failure in not condemning "all forms of slavery" simply don't know their history. What Father Panzer has shown is that the Catholic Church was consistent in condemning race-based chattel slavery, something which Eugene IV could not have known in 1537 was going to be invented in the succeeding century and would be justified by liberal, secular, Enlightened philosophers like John Locke, Thomas Jefferson and many others. Anyone who doubts the role of liberalism and the Enlightenment in giving rise to a vicious modern form of slavery, which the papacy always opposed, should read Liberalism: A Counter-History. In my review of Losurdo's book, I observed:

"Losurdo is also informative on the role that early liberalism played in the revival of slavery. During the revival of slavery in the early modern era, scholars recognized that Europe had eliminated slavery, at least within Europe. (p. 32, quoting Jean Bodin, "Europe was freed of slavery after about 1250.") Slavery was not a residue of the past. (p. 33.) The Catholic Church was criticized for promoting the abolition of slavery and for opposing its reintroduction in the modern world, thus encouraging sloth and dissipation of vagrants. (p. 34.)

Moreover, the liberal era saw a different kind of slavery. According to John Locke, Old Testament slavery was more in the nature of servant and master, where the master did not have the unlimited power that characterized the "modern" form of slavery, and the servant was more in the nature of a hired hand. (p. 41 - 43.) Pre-modern slavery was described by Locke as "imperfect slavery," in which a person was condemned to "drudgery" and not "slavery," and could not be killed without restraint, but if injured by the master, had to be compensated or freed from drudgery. (p. 109.) Unlike this traditional slavery, more akin to having a lifetime job, modern slavery involved the excise over the slave of an absolute dominion and an absolute power, a legislative power of life and death, and an arbitrary power encompassing life itself, according to Locke. (p. 42.) This kind of slavery began with a person surrendering the right to life, by being captured in war or convicted of a capital crime, and the term of slavery was simply a kind of "stay of execution."

Losurdo connects the rise of modern slavery with the power of England. The liberal powers, first Holland, and then England, supplanted Spain in the slave trade at an early point. Only a fraction of slaves were carried by non-English shipping. Unlike England, Spain made efforts at an early point to outlaw slavery in its territory at an early point. (Another theme that seems to come through Losurdo's book is just how strong the human impulse to enslave other humans seems to be.)"

The critics of Father Panzer's work need to read more. If they do, they will see that the sad truth of modernity is its willingness to dehumanize foreign people, often with scientific arguments, and thereby to justify the enslavement of Africans, Indians or the poor. To its credit, the popes have stood against the modern tendency to split humanity into subspecies, where the lesser breeds may be exploited for the benefit of the master race, from the beginning and throughout the progress of modernity.

Father Panzer set for himself the narrow goal of demonstrating from the writings of the popes that the papacy consistently condemned the enslavement of native people on the grounds that they were "barbarians" or were not Christians or were - as so many modern people thought until the mid-20th Century - "subhuman." The consistent position of the popes in resisting modernity and the siren call of going along with science and what the best thinkers were teaching should be a lesson for us all.
Welen
I have never met nor read of any apologist who flagrantly set forth on a pilgrimage of in-your-face deception. It is as if the Author is saying - yes, slavery, what can you do about it? Please don't ever buy this book! The book is actually a double scream, a second scream to rearrange or remodel slave markets for another buying and selling of Africans.