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by Robert Pollack
Download The Faith of Biology and the Biology of Faith fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Robert Pollack
  • ISBN:
    0231115067
  • ISBN13:
    978-0231115063
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Columbia University Press (November 15, 2000)
  • Pages:
    144 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1286 kb
  • ePUB format
    1629 kb
  • DJVU format
    1578 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    914
  • Formats:
    lrf docx lit mobi


His most recent book is The Course of Nature, a book of drawings by the artist Amy Pollack, accompanied by his short explanatory essays. The University Seminars at Columbia University. Preceded by Arnold Collery. Dean of Columbia College 1982 – 1989.

Pollack discusses his personal development of faith and the associated conflicts that came from that shift. I found the book to be an important contribution to building bridges between science and religion. Let me start by saying that although I have not read Dr. Pollack's book, I did attend one of his lectures discussing "The faith of biology, the biology of faith.

Robert Pollack is a molecular geneticist and a Jew, who realizes that his tw. .Are there parallels between the "moment of insight" in science and the emergence of the "unknowable" in religious faith? Where does scientific insight come from? Award-winning biologist Robert Pollack argues that an alliance between religious faith and science is not necessarily an argument in favor of irrationality: the two can inform each other's visions of the world.

Pollack, Robert, 1940-. Varying Form of Title: Faith of biology and the biology of faith. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. Publication, Distribution, et. New York (C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

By Allan Mazur; and Leon S. Robertson.

Pollack, Amy and Robert Pollack, 2014.

His most recent book is The Course of Nature, a book of drawings by the artist Amy Pollack, accompanied by his short explanatory essays. Pollack, Amy and Robert Pollack, 2014. Pollack, . with frontispiece by Amy Pollack, 2012. New york, Columbia University Press.

The Biology of Religious Behavior: The Evolutionary Origins of Faith and Religion By Ellens, J. Harold Journal of Psychology and Christianity, Vol. 29, No. 4, Winter 2010.

New Biological Books. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Rethinking the Theoretical Foundation of Sociobiology.

Are there parallels between the "moment of insight" in science and the emergence of the "unknowable" in religious faith? Where does scientific insight come from? Award-winning biologist Robert Pollack argues that an alliance between religious faith and science is not necessarily an argument in favor of irrationality: the two can inform each other's visions of the world.Pollack begins by reflecting on the large questions of meaning and purpose―and the difficulty of finding either in the orderly world described by the data of science. He considers the obligation to find meaning and purpose despite natural selection's claim to be a complete explanation of our presence as a species―a claim that calls upon neither natural intention, nor design, nor Designer. Next, the book focuses on matters of free will, from the choice of a scientist to accept evidence, to the choice of a religious person to accept a revelation, to a patient's loss of free will in medical treatment. Here Pollack addresses questions of ethics and offers a provocative comparison of two difficult texts whose contents remain incompletely understood: the DNA "text" of the human genome and the Hebrew record of Jewish written and oral law. In closing, Pollack considers the promise of genetic medicine in enabling us to glimpse our own future and offers a reconsideration of the possible utility of the so-called placebo effect in curing illness.Whether refuting a DNA-based biological model of Judaism or discussing the Darwinian concept of the species, Pollack, under the banner of free inquiry, presents a genuine, vital, and well-argued assay of the intersection of science and religion.

MarF
Pollack's writing is a little disjointed but the overall thrust of the book is interesting. Pollack's distinction between rational and irrational is unclear. His book would be greatly helped by dilineating what he takes these two terms to mean. As far as I can tell, he equate rationality simply with science. But why think this is so? Why can't there be other kinds of reasoning than just scientific? Still, his position that there is an intuitional side to scientific thinking, and that religion is that same intuitional approach pushed as far as it can go, is interesting. Further, his examination of the placebo effect and its importance is ahead of its time. This book's strength is the examination of bio-ethics. Even though Pollack doesn't come out and say it, and it takes some putting the dots together yourself, his overall view seems to be that the placebo effect has some relationship to religion. That the power of trust is itself a kind of justification of faith, and that we shouldn't be scared of things that genuinely help people just because we don't understand it or have a methodology to study it. That strikes me as a very interesting position, and I think the other reviewers here seemed to have missed it. There is a good critique of this book in Lorenzo Albacete's GOD AT THE RITZ, I strongly suggest reading them as a unit.
Togor
Every manager or administrator who cares or wishes to care about the implications of her/his enforcement of our systemic rules rather than the needs of the patient first would find that "Faith" paints a picture for belief wrapped inside science, and science wrapped up inside faith.
Nahelm
Terrific volume. Best biology/religion book it there.
Ral
Dr. Robert Pollack is an American biologist at Columbia University; he is also a professor of religion at Union Theological Seminary. He has written other books, Signs of Life: The Language and Meanings of DNA,The Sixth and Seventh Day Man: A Trilogy, etc.

He wrote in the Preface of this 2000 book, "I was invited... to give ... a series of three public lectures... I turned to a class of question that had been bothering me for some time, the ones arising at the junction of scientific and religious conceptions of the world..."

He begins by noting that he is a Jewish molecular biologist, then suggests that "a Jewish understanding of our appearance by evolution through natural selection introduces an irrational certainty of meaning and purpose to a set of data that otherwise show no sign of supporting any meaning to our lives on earth beyond that of being numbers a a cosmic lottery with no paymaster."

He later admits that "I must write from the heart and place feelings on a par with facts, something a scientist is ordinarily obliged to avoid." (Pg. 2) He argues that it is as much, or more, a matter of choice "to transcend balanced consideration and respond instead to felt right or wrong. Religions come into play at such moments... as a source of guidance, helping to assure that the choice is made with a full appreciation of irrational and inexplicable feelings as well as data." (Pg. 49)

He concludes with the observation that "medicine may give both doctor and patient the chance to share an experience of the Unknowable... (otherwise) we will all continue to suffer from an avoidable loss of meaning in our own lives." (Pg. 103)

This book is a valuable addition to the growing contemporary literature on the relation between religion and physical science.
Ubranzac
It is much too rare to find a prominent scientist who does such a good job of explaining why he has become a strong theist. Pollack discusses his personal development of faith and the associated conflicts that came from that shift. I found the book to be an important contribution to building bridges between science and religion.
Siatanni
Let me start by saying that although I have not read Dr. Pollack's book, I did attend one of his lectures discussing "The faith of biology, the biology of faith." Thus, this is more a comment on Dr. Pollack's explanations of his approach to this critical issue than a comment on his book. Dr. Pollack seems to take a rather interesting though confusing standpoint on humanity and its search for the meaning of existence through science and religion. He seems to argue that science and religion are somewhat linked in their striving for human nature, although their insights are different. However, Dr. Pollack was not clear on how this two insights are diferent (or the degree of extraneousness). Also, I got a little confused on his discussion of the "unknown" and the "unknowable." Obviously, this is not an easy reading, and anyone attempting to understand this book should first try to focus more on the human side of life rather than on the spiritual or purely scientific side, which Dr. Pollack seems to leave unclear.