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Download Judaism, Physics and God: Searching for Sacred Metaphors in a Post-Einstein World fb2

by Rabbi David W. Nelson
Download Judaism, Physics and God: Searching for Sacred Metaphors in a Post-Einstein World fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Rabbi David W. Nelson
  • ISBN:
    1580232523
  • ISBN13:
    978-1580232524
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Jewish Lights; 1 edition (February 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1571 kb
  • ePUB format
    1163 kb
  • DJVU format
    1583 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    207
  • Formats:
    lit lrf docx doc


Xxxviii, 300 pages : 24 cm. "In our era, we often feel that we can either speak about God or think scientifically about the world, but never both at the same time. But what if we reconciled the two?

Xxxviii, 300 pages : 24 cm.

Judaism, Physics and God book. You might enjoy Rabbi Nelson’s descriptions of the major theories of modern physics – and his insights about the evolution of Jewish thought. But the book’s call to action has been largely ignored, for good reason. Oct 13, 2008 Mattie rated it really liked it.

Judaism, Physics and God reframes Judaism so that it is in harmony with the conquests of modern scientific thinking, and introduces fascinating new ways to understand your relationship with God in context of some of the most exciting scientific ideas of the contemporary world. Rabbi David W. Nelson, PhD, a popular lecturer and former senior teaching fellow at CLALThe National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, is associate director of ARZA, the Association of Reform Zionists of America. He can be reached at judaismphysicsgodo.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In this provocative fusion of religion and science, Rabbi David Nelson examines the great theories of modern physics to find new ways for contemporary people to express their spiritual beliefs and thoughts. Turner Publishing Company.

Nelson is a rabbi, not a physicist, but he has an elegant sense and subtle understanding of physical principles. He takes an unflinching look at the lessons that physics has taught us about the universe and then uses these ideas to inform a powerful understanding of God. Further, he uses these new metaphors for God and demonstrates how they can be interpreted in light of Judaism.

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Contact: Phone: 845-758-7438 E-mail: Department: Chaplaincy Location: Hopson Office: 203. Campus Road, PO Box 5000 Annandale-on-Hudson, New York 12504-5000 Phone: 800-BARDCOL Admission Phone: 845-758-7472 Admission E-mail: admission.

book by David W. Nelson. In our era, we often feel that we can either speak about God or think scientifically about the world, but never both at the same time. But if an ancient tradition can claim to be not only ancient but also timeless and contemporary, it has a far greater chance of convincing each new, young generation of its value.

2013) Physics in Judaism. Oviedo L. (eds) Encyclopedia of Sciences and Religions.

Woodstock, VT: Jewish Lights Publishing. Authors and Affiliations. 2013) Physics in Judaism.

Hear the Voices of Ancient Wisdom in the Modern Language of Science

"Ancient traditions, whose only claim to authenticity is that they are old, run the risk of becoming old-fashioned. But if an ancient tradition can claim to be not only ancient but also timeless and contemporary, it has a far greater chance of convincing each new, young generation of its value. Such a claim requires that each generation's retelling use the new metaphors of the new generation."―from Chapter 1

In our era, we often feel that we can either speak about God or think scientifically about the world, but never both at the same time. But what if we reconciled the two? How could the basic scientific truths of how the natural world came to be shape our understanding of our own spiritual search for meaning?

In this provocative fusion of religion and science, Rabbi David Nelson examines the great theories of modern physics to find new ways for contemporary people to express their spiritual beliefs and thoughts. Nelson explores cosmology, quantum mechanics, chaos theory, relativity and string theory in clear, non-technical terms and recasts the traditional views of our ancestors in language that can be understood in a world in which space flight, atom-smashing and black holes are common features of our metaphorical landscape.

Judaism, Physics and God reframes Judaism so that it is in harmony with the conquests of modern scientific thinking, and introduces fascinating new ways to understand your relationship with God in context of some of the most exciting scientific ideas of the contemporary world.


Bludsong
We are all conflicted about the traditional portrayals of God and the insights of modern science. David Nelson has written a thoughtful, complete and enjoyable book that provides a fascinating and inspirational reconciliation of the two. I found my self giggling with delight at the insights David Nelson provides, and fascinated by the easy to understand explanations of such concepts as quantum science and string theory. He starts with a remarkable yet obvious question: what if God were not a third party, but rather and integral part and cause of how things happen? Not simply the designer, but rather the very operation of the system. Like Nelson, I'm not a physicist, but he was able to communicate complex concepts in easily understood terms
Sarin
I will not reveal anything - a must read for those scientific minds seeking spiritual wisdom.
Arashigore
This book is at times very interesting, but, in the end, unsatisfying.

“Judaism, Physics and God” is a different approach to reconciling science and religion.

Rather than (futilely) attempting to prove that science and the Bible are actually consistent with each, as so many other authors have done, Rabbi Nelson proposes an equally futile alternative: Rewriting Jewish theology to fit the latest theories in physics.

This undertaking, while interesting to consider, is flawed from the outset: Religion and science address fundamentally different questions. Insisting that they must be consistent with each other is silly.

Simply put, scientists are trying to understand natural phenomena, through replicable measurement. Religionists are trying to figure out what our purpose is and how we can best live together.

You might enjoy Rabbi Nelson’s descriptions of the major theories of modern physics – and his insights about the evolution of Jewish thought. But the book’s call to action has been largely ignored, for good reason.
Dagdage
This book makes me confortable with the apparent contradictions life
For people that trust physics, it shows me that that trust is not far from faith
Yozshujind
Judaism, Physics And God: Searching For Sacred Metaphors In A Post-Ein-stein World strives to answer the question, "If we can't see it or prove it, how can we believe it?" Leading the reader on a journey through both the ideas of modern physics and the ancient teachings of rabbinic text, Judaism, Physics and God stresses that faith and scientific insight do not need to be mutually exclusive. Chapters explore cosmology and creation, quantum mechanics, Albert Enstein's theories of special relativity, general relativity and Jewish meaning, string theory, and integrating new metaphors and scientific awareness into traditional Jewish life. As meticulous in its research of sacred Judaic texts and philosophy as it is of modern physics, yet presented to be as accessible as possible to the lay reader striving to better understand complex concepts, Judaism, Physics And God is a welcome addition to religious debate and studies shelves. Highly recommended.
Thetath
This is one of the most interesting and important books on Religion and philosophy that has been published since Einstein had to reconcile his discoveries with his beliefs.

Much of Judaism (and., by extension, Christianity) operates through the use of metaphors to bring us closer to God. God is described as a Shepard, as a King, as our Father, as our Rock, and as Light, just as a few examples. By definition, a metaphor illuminates but does not fully describe-- any of us can think of what aspects of a father we would ascribe to God, and what aspects of a father (growing old and dying) we would not ascribe to God.

At one level, Rabbi Nelson in this book asks what metaphors from physics- specifically post-Newtonian physics-- can we use to illuminate G-d? His metaphors are fascinating: to cite one example, he asks us to consider God as the Light. God is often described as "Light" in prayers. God is also described as timeless-- a thousand years is but an instant to God according to the Rabbis. Well, physics happens to describe Light as timeless as well- photons from the big bang haven't aged at all in the 15 or so billion years of it's existence.

That's the first level of the book, and by itself it is very fascinating. God as the Big Bang, God as Light, God as shaped like multi-dimensional manifolds used in string-theory. Rabbi Nelson is very careful to explain the physics at a very approachable and enjoyable level, perhaps he succeeds so well because like most of us he does not have an advanced science degree. Yet there is a deeper level to this book as well: for Judaism, indeed for Western religion to remain relevant, it has to confront and grow along with our growing understanding of reality. This is the fundamental challenge that has been presented to Religion since the dawn of the Age of Reason. Rabbi Nelson takes on the challenge --- not by attempting to prove or disprove the existence of God, but by attempting to understand God through our growing knowledge of the universe.

You do not have to agree with Rabbi Nelson's personal beliefs to learn from this book-- there's plenty here for everyone from the confirmed atheist to the most Orthodox believer. Furthermore, he sets up a framework that can--and most likely will--be used by others for generations to come. I fully believe that this book will be referenced generations from now, if not beyond.