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Download Loving Big Brother: Surveillance Culture and Performance Space fb2

by John McGrath
Download Loving Big Brother: Surveillance Culture and Performance Space fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    John McGrath
  • ISBN:
    0415275385
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415275385
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (March 4, 2004)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1467 kb
  • ePUB format
    1685 kb
  • DJVU format
    1433 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    805
  • Formats:
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In Loving Big Brother the author tackles head on the overstated claims of the crime-prevention and .

In Loving Big Brother the author tackles head on the overstated claims of the crime-prevention and anti-terrorism lobbies. But he also argues that we desire and enjoy surveillance, and that, if we can understand why this is, we may transform the effect it has on our lives. This iconoclastic book develops a notion of surveillance space - somewhere beyond the public and the private, somewhere we will all soon live. It's a place we're just beginning to understand.

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John Edward McGrath (born 5 September 1962) is a British artistic director and chief executive of Manchester International Festival. John Edward McGrath was born 5 September 1962 in Mold, North Wales and grew up in Liverpool. McGrath gained his P. from the New York University Graduate School of Arts and Science in 1999. As a development officer McGrath founded Arts Integrated Merseyside (AIM), a disability arts organisation based in Liverpool, which later became DaDaFest

In Loving Big Brother the author tackles head on the overstated claims of the crime-prevention and .

Loving Big Brother Surveillance Culture and Performance Space.

Loving Big Brother: Surveillance Culture and Performance Space. In Loving Big Brother the author tackles head on the overstated claims of the crime-prevention and anti-terrorism lobbies.

Loving Big Brother, based on John McGrath's book Loving Big Brother: Surveillance Culture and Performance Space. 2001 Manchester Evening News ‘Best Fringe Performance’; The Bogus Woman. 2000 The Scotsman ‘Fringe First Award’; The Bogus Woman Runner-up Susan Smith Blackburn Award; Kay Adshead for The Bogus Woman Runner-up Emma Award ‘Best production’; The Bogus Woman. 1997 Time Out Award ‘Best Fringe Production’; The Censor Writers Guild Award ‘Best Play’; The Censor Guinness Ingenuity Award; The Big Story Season. 1996 Guinness Ingenuity Award; Coming to Land Season. Current collaborations.

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An open free discussion and performance based events that bring artists, activists and the general . Loving Big Brother, based on John McGrath's book Loving Big Brother: Surveillance Culture and Performance Space.

An open free discussion and performance based events that bring artists, activists and the general public together. Recent platforms include: Military Families against the War Featuring anti-war campaigner Rose Gentle. Injustice featuring the film Injustice by Ken Faro. Why are we Afraid of a Young An examination of youth violence masculinity and the culture of fear.

In Loving Big Brother the author tackles head on the overstated claims of the crime-prevention and anti-terrorism lobbies. But he also argues that we desire and enjoy surveillance, and that, if we can understand why this is, we may transform the effect it has on our lives. This book looks at a wide range of performance and visual artists, at popular TV shows and movies, and at our day-to-day encounters with surveillance, rooting its arguments in an accessible reading of cultural theory.

Constant scrutiny by surveillance cameras is usually seen as - at best - an invasion of privacy, and at worst an infringement of human rights. But in this radical new account of the uses of surveillance in art, performance and popular culture, John E McGrath sets out a surprizing alternative: a world where we have much to gain from the experience of being watched.

This iconoclastic book develops a notion of surveillance space - somewhere beyond the public and the private, somewhere we will all soon live. It's a place we're just beginning to understand.