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by John Walter,Roger Schofield
Download Famine, Disease and the Social Order in Early Modern Society (Cambridge Studies in Population, Economy and Society in Past Time) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    John Walter,Roger Schofield
  • ISBN:
    0521259061
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521259064
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (July 28, 1989)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
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Although Western societies cannot escape from images of famine in the present world .

Although Western societies cannot escape from images of famine in the present world, their direct experience with widespread hunger has receded into the past. England was one of the very first countries to escape from the shadow of famine and in this volume. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Series: Cambridge Studies in Population, Economy and Society in Past Time (Book 10). Paperback: 352 pages. Publisher: Cambridge University Press (April 26, 1991).

Publisher: Cambridge University Press.

John Walter, Roger Schofield. Download (pdf, 1. 9 Mb) Donate Read.

Series: Cambridge Studies in Population, Economy and Society in Past Time. JOHN WALTER Lecturer in History, University of Essex. and ROGER SCHOFIELD Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure

Series: Cambridge Studies in Population, Economy and Society in Past Time. File: PDF, 1. 9 MB. 在线阅读. and ROGER SCHOFIELD Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure. The right of the University of Cambridge to print and sell all manner of books was granted by Henry VIII in 1534. The University has printed and published continuously since 1584. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge New York New Rochelle Melbourne Sydney.

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Schofield served as president of the British Society for Population Studies from 1985 to 1987 and was elected a Fellow of the .

Schofield served as president of the British Society for Population Studies from 1985 to 1987 and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in 1970, a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society in 1987 and a Fellow of the British Academy (the United Kingdom's national academy for the humanities and social sciences) in 1988. The University of. Cambridge awarded him a higher doctorate in 2005 Publications.

Population history of the Middle East and the Balkans (Isis Press, 2002). Demographic Collapse: Indian Peru, 1520-1620 (Cambridge University Press, 2004). Sanchez-Albornoz, Nicolas, and . Population of Latin America: A History (1974). Karpat, Kemal H. Ottoman Population, 1830-1914: Demographic and Social Characteristics (1985). Population history of the Middle East and the Balkans (Isis Press, 2002).

Although Western societies cannot escape from images of famine in the present world, their direct experience with widespread hunger has receded into the past. England was one of the very first countries to escape from the shadow of famine and in this volume, a team of distinguished economic, social, and demographic historians analyze why. The contributors combine detailed local studies of individual communities, broader analyses of the impact of hunger and disease, and methodological discussions that explore the effect of crisis mortality on early modern societies. The essays examine the complex interrelationships among past demographic, social, and economic structures, and demonstrate that the impact of hunger and disease can provide a unique vehicle for an exploration of early modern society.