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by Heather L. Duda
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Heather L. Duda
  • ISBN:
    0786434066
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786434060
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    McFarland (September 9, 2008)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1655 kb
  • ePUB format
    1477 kb
  • DJVU format
    1829 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    320
  • Formats:
    lrf txt lrf doc


Heather L. Duda is an assistant English professor at the University of Rio Grande in Rio Grande, Ohio. I would have liked to see one chapter devoted to the monster hunter in other genres and an attempt to point out similarities and differences in how the topos was handled.

Heather L. She lives in Jackson, Ohio. I believe that would have strengthened the argument considerably. That one quibble aside, this was an excellent book, very interesting to read and free of technical or academic jargon. It would definitely help the reader to be familiar with popular horror books, movies, and TV shows so that they have a bit of background on the examples that are used.

This is part of Dr. Duda’s dissertation and it is what it is, a scholarly discussion of the monster hunter from his early beginnings to the twenty-first century. This is part of Dr. This could be (and I’m sure is) used in a classroom on film studies, horror literature etc. Occasionally it gets a bit slow but overall, it’s an interesting look at the monster hunter. Duda's ambitious The Monster Hunter in Modern Popular Culture is an analytical survey of a wide variety of visual and literary texts to illustrate how the archetype has evolved over the last century. She begins by identifying herself as a long-time fan of horror fiction and film: "To me, a good scare better than anything else" (1). As a young teenager, Duda remembers turning off the lights and watching the TV mini-series version of Stephen King's It (1990), "curled up in the recliner, unable to move for fear of clowns.

As monsters in popular media have evolved and grown more complex .

As monsters in popular media have evolved and grown more complex, so have those who take on the job of stalking and staking them. This book examines the evolution of the contemporary monster hunter from Bram Stoker's Abraham Van Helsing to today's non-traditional monster hunters such as Blade, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Watchmen

As monsters in popular media have evolved and grown more complex, so have those who take on the job of stalking and staking them.

As monsters in popular media have evolved and grown more complex, so have those who take on the job of stalking and staking them.

This book examines the evolution of the contemporary monster hunter from Bram Stoker's Abraham Van Helsing to today's non-traditional monster hunters such as Blade, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Watchmen

This book examines the evolution of the contemporary monster hunter from Bram Stoker's Abraham Van Helsing to today's non-traditional monster hunters such as Blade, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Watchmen. This examination reveals how the monster hunter began as a white, upper-class, educated male and became everything from a vampire to a teenage girl with supernatural powers.

The Monster Hunter in Modern Popular Culture by Heather L. Duda (McFarland) surveys books, films, television shows, and graphic novels showing the evolution of the monster hunter from white, upper-class, educated male to everything from a vampire to a teenage girl. Duda (McFarland) surveys books, films, television shows, and graphic novels showing the evolution of the monster hunter from white, upper-class, educated male to everything from a vampire to a teenage girl with supernatural powers. Videodrome: Studies in the Horror Film by Tim Lucas (Millipede Press) celebrates the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Cronenberg film

The 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger has had a lasting influence as it remains both a bestseller and a frequently challenged book. Numerous works in popular culture have referenced the novel.

The 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye by J. Factors contributing to the novel's mystique and impact include its portrayal of protagonist Holden Caulfield; its tone of sincerity; its themes of familial neglect, tension between teens and society, and rebellion; its previous banned status; and Salinger's reclusiveness.

Kulu Duda Crafting and Upgrades. Kulu Duda has ? upgrade levels. It follows the ? path, detailed below. Rare ? Craft with: ? x1, ? x2, ? x 3, ?? x. Kulu. Kulu Duda II.

As monsters in popular media have evolved and grown more complex, so have those who take on the job of stalking and staking them. This book examines the evolution of the contemporary monster hunter from Bram Stoker's Abraham Van Helsing to today's non-traditional monster hunters such as Blade, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Watchmen. Critically surveying a diverse range of books, films, television shows, and graphic novels, this study reveals how the monster hunter began as a white, upper-class, educated male and became everything from a vampire to a teenage girl with supernatural powers. Now often resembling the monsters they've vowed to conquer, modern characters occupy a gray area where the battle is often with their own inner natures as much as with the "evil" they fight.

Feri
This is a rewritten version of the author's Ph.D. thesis, and it's obvious that she's done her research, and what's more, she's even THOUGHT about the subject! The various chapters take an in-depth look at the archetype of a monster hunter beginning with Van Helsing from Stoker's 'Dracula' and bringing it up to the current time with looks at slasher films and current (or recent) TV and movie series. There is one chapter devoted to the female monster slayer, such as Buffy, Willow, Faith (from Buffy the Vampire Slayer) and Ripley (Alien movies) and the 'Last Girl' type from various slasher movies. All chapters are very interesting and well-written, with some insightful remarks on the growth and maturation of the figure of the monster hunter in order to retain appeal for modern audiences. My only quibble with this book is the author's explicit decision to focus on the horror genre. I can see that she did need to limit herself in some way, but I question whether her conclusions would be applicable to monster hunters or monster slayers outside of horror. What comes most to mind is Bilbo Baggins (and/or Bard the Bowman) in The Hobbit. I would have liked to see one chapter devoted to the monster hunter in other genres and an attempt to point out similarities and differences in how the topos was handled. I believe that would have strengthened the argument considerably.

That one quibble aside, this was an excellent book, very interesting to read and free of technical or academic jargon. It would definitely help the reader to be familiar with popular horror books, movies, and TV shows so that they have a bit of background on the examples that are used. But, most of the examples cited have seeped into truly 'popular' culture enough so that most people will have at least a passing familarity with them, and the educated reader will be able to follow the argument without having seen or read the works.

Note on Kindle formatting: Good, but not perfect. There were a few instances of oddball hyphenation, but nothing major, and nothing to detract from the reading experience.
HappyLove
I recently finished reading this book (Kindle edition) and greatly enjoyed it. As a long-time fan of science-fiction and fantasy and a sucker for an academic look at those topics, this was a great read. The book, a rewritten version of the author's grad school thesis, dissects the evolution of the monster hunter in pop culture, from Stoker's Van Helsing to Riddick. Of particular interest to me was her chapter on the female monster hunter, where she considers in depth Buffy, Faith, Willow, and Ripley (from the Alien movie series). It's also interesting to see how the changes in the monster hunter archetype reflect changes in the culture as a whole. Highly recommended for all, but particularly those fans of the genre.
Mr Freeman
This book is one of the most resourceful and entertaining books to read, with insightful comments about modern culture's point of view of the monster hunter, and of how the character of the monster hunters have evolved since its earliest appearance in literature and mass media. Definitely recommend for anyone to read.
Gavirim
Great and unique take on modern monster hunters, but the more challenging and complex analysis of Bladerunner is conspicuous by its absence.