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by Robert Polzin
Download Samuel and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History : Part Two : 1 Samuel (Indiana Studies in Biblical Literature) (Pt. 2) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Robert Polzin
  • ISBN:
    0253345529
  • ISBN13:
    978-0253345523
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Indiana Univ Pr (September 1, 1993)
  • Pages:
    296 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1587 kb
  • ePUB format
    1276 kb
  • DJVU format
    1874 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    639
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ROBERT POLZIN is Director, School of Comparative Literary Studies and Professor of Religion, Carleton University

ROBERT POLZIN is Director, School of Comparative Literary Studies and Professor of Religion, Carleton University. He is author of Moses and the Deuteronomist and Samuel and the Deuteronomist, both volumes in a series of four books on the Deuteronomic History, as well as Late Biblical Hebrew. I have read over one hundred books on the bible (from an analytical point of view), and this book is simply awesome. Polzin shows how and why the Deuteronomist was such a brilliant author/redacter. The reader will see the bible in a new perspective. I absolutely loved this book.

Samuel and the Deuteronomist book. Start by marking Samuel and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History Part Two: 1 Samuel as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Samuel and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History Part Two: 1 Samuel.

History : Part 1 : udges (Indiana Studies in Biblical Literatu) (Pt. 1) Robert Polzin.

Moses and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History : Part 1 : udges (Indiana Studies in Biblical Literatu) (Pt. Categories: Literary Approaches. Pages: 256 Publisher: Indiana University Press Published: 1993 ISBN-10: 0253208483 ISBN-13: 9780253208484. Find at a Library Find at Google Books. Carnehl November 25, 2019 5 5. Brilliant and insightful narrative critique.

ROBERT POLZIN is Director, School of Comparative Literary Studies and Professor of Religion, Carleton University. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Indiana University Press, 22 Eki 1993 - 296 sayfa.

will profoundly affect biblical scholarship for at least a generation. Indiana University Press, 22 Eki 1993 - 296 sayfa.

Indiana Studies in Biblical Literature. Samuel and the Deuteronomist. Series Indiana Studies in Biblical Literature. Indiana University Press. 9780253208491: Paperback Release Date: 22nd October 1993. Dimensions: 152 x 229. Number of Pages: 296. A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History Part Two: 1 Samuel. Marc Z. Brettler, The Journal of Religion. Acknowledgments Introduction. 1. Hannah and Her Son: A Parable (1:1-4:1a). 2. Ark in Exile: The Parable Continues (4:1b-7:17).

Marc Z. Brettler, "Samuel and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History: 1 Samuel. Robert Polzin," The Journal of Religion 70, no. 4 (Oc. 1990): 625-626. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Apostle Paul in Arabia. Stephen's Defense before the Sanhedrin.

a literary study of the Deuteronomic history : part two : 1 samuel.

Samuel and the Deuteronomist. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Samuel and the Deuteronomist from your list? Samuel and the Deuteronomist. a literary study of the Deuteronomic history : part two : 1 samuel. 1st ed. by Robert Polzin. Published 1989 by Harper & Row in San Francisco. Bible, Criticism, interpretation. Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

The Poetics of Biblical Narrative: Ideological Literature and the Drama of Reading.

David and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History. Part Three: Samuel 2. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993. Samuel and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of Deuteronomic History. Part Two: Samuel 1. New York: Harper & Row, 1989. Rőmer, Thomas C. The So-called Deuteronomistic History: A Sociological, Historical and Literary Introduction. London: T&T Clark International, 2005. The Poetics of Biblical Narrative: Ideological Literature and the Drama of Reading. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985.


Kajishakar
Robert Polzin’s books on the Bible offer readers a brilliant deep analysis of what scripture is saying by focusing on the biblical words rather than on what readers feel they need to find in the text because of a religious motivation. The following are a few examples from the life of Samuel, as told in the biblical book Samuel. While most religious people prefer to think of this prophet and judge as a righteous and good person, a close reading of the passages reveals the opposite.

A principle part of the plot in Samuel is that in Samuel’s old age, the people approach him to select a king for them. Polzin recognizes that Eli the priest can be seen to prefigure the disasters that will occur when the Israelites have kings. Eli is presented as a royal figure sitting on a seat outside the sanctuary as if he were on a throne, but he falls off the seat and dies.

In chapter 8, the people approach the prophet and ask for his and his sons replacement, a king. Samuel feels that the three of them are being rejected, and this feeling changes the prophet who “now appears a stubborn, self-interested judge, who for his own reasons is slow to do the Lord’s will” (page 83).

Samuel anoints Saul as king of Israel and gives him three seemingly miraculous signs to show him that he is fit to serve as king. Significantly, although Samuel is making Saul a king, Polzin observes that his elaborate set of instructions are arguably a strategy for asserting continued control over the man he is anointing, a control that continues throughout Samuel’s life. Samuel wants both a king and a puppet.

In 10:8, Samuel tells Saul, “Go before me to Gilgal and know that I will come down to you to offer burnt offerings, and to sacrifice peace offerings. Wait seven days until I come to you, and show you what you should do.” Polzin points out that this prophecy was never fulfilled reflecting Samuel’s failure as a prophet. He also states that despite encouraging Saul, Samuel tells him not to act until he tells him to do so; again, treating the king as his puppet.

In 10:20, Polzin notes that Samuel stages a lottery as a means to prove that God wants Saul as the Israelite king, but the only other times lottery is used in scripture is to discover a culprit. Robert Alter adds: “Samuel has chosen a mechanism associated with incrimination and punishment.”

Polzin states that people can gain much insight by comparing every event, intention, act, and reaction in one tale in scripture with a similar one elsewhere in the Bible. One should do so in regard to Samuel by comparing his story to the tale of Abraham and Sarah receiving predictions from angels in Genesis 18. Polzin similarly points readers on page 221 to the fact that one of Saul’s final acts is eating, and “the last image we have of the last Judahite king is of the exiled Jehoiachin dining every day of his life at the table of the king of Babylon (II Kings 25:30).”

Readers may feel that Saul did not act improperly, and even if he did, his behavior was not extraordinarily bad. Polzin writes: “It is not difficult to see Samuel’s subsequent accusation of the king as a trumped-up charge to keep Saul on the defensive and under his prophetic control” (page 129), because he opposed establishing a monarchy in Israel for personal reasons. Actually, Polzin adds, it was not Saul who acted improperly, it was Samuel who missed the appointment that he prophetically foretold in chapter 10 that he would meet Saul in ten days.
Drelalak
Polzin's work is brilliant, but intended primarily for serious scholars who have a good knowledge of the text. His analysis of the language of the text as well as exploring the multiple possible meanings of the original Hebrew are only part of what makes this an important text.
Polzin's literary analysis is also a tremendous addition to the field. In many areas where the text has been generally thought of as contradictory, he finds plausible interpretations that create continuity and add to the meaning of the text. Further, his understanding of the redactors possible intent greatly enhances the readers understanding of the primary text.
Finally, the theological implications of his commentary deserve consideration. Polzin brings the characters of Samuel and Saul, two of the Bibles most interesting personalities, fully to life. His exploration of their flaws and failures as well as their successes makes his interpretations that much more meaningful.
While not always easy, the text is a must addition for any serious or aspiring scholar of these texts. If you are a beginner, begin with a good translation and easier linear commentary like Alter or Fox. If you want to go deeper, I urge you to purchase this important text.
Trex
Polzin's study of the first part of Samuel is based upon synchronic literary reading. He applied method of "close reading" which enriches the text's meaning and message. It is highly recommended to lecturers, students, and researchers.