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by Eric Schlosser
Download Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the Allamerican Meal fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Eric Schlosser
  • ISBN:
    143951254X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1439512548
  • Genre:
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
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  • FB2 format
    1467 kb
  • ePUB format
    1782 kb
  • DJVU format
    1697 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    858
  • Formats:
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Fast Food Nation book.

Fast Food Nation book. Schlosser's myth-shattering survey stretches Fast food has hastened the malling of our landscape, widened the chasm between rich and poor, fueled an epidemic of obesity, and propelled American cultural imperialism abroad. That's a lengthy list of charges, but here Eric Schlosser makes them stick with an artful mix of first-rate reportage, wry wit, and careful reasoning.

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal is a 2001 book written by investigative journalist Eric Schlosser that examines the local and global influence of the United States fast food industry. First serialized by Rolling Stone in 1999, the book has drawn comparisons to Upton Sinclair's 1906 muckraking novel The Jungle.

Eric Schlosser has been a correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly since 1996

Eric Schlosser has been a correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly since 1996. His work has also appeared in Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, the Nation, and The New Yorker. He has received a National Magazine Award and a Sidney Hillman Foundation Award for reporting. In 1998 Schlosser wrote an investigative piece on the fast food industry for Rolling Stone. What began as a two-part article for the magazine turned into a groundbreaking book: Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal (2001). The book helped to change the way that Americans think about what they eat.

Eric Schlosser's Fast Food Nation is a good old-fashioned muckraking expose in the tradition of The American . Fast Food Nation presents these sometimes startling discoveries in a manner that manages to be both careful and fast-paced.

Eric Schlosser's Fast Food Nation is a good old-fashioned muckraking expose in the tradition of The American Way of Death that's as disturbing as it is irresistible.

In 2001, Fast Food Nation was published to critical acclaim and became an international bestseller. Eric Schlosser’s exposé revealed how the fast food industry has altered the landscape of America, widened the gap between rich and poor, fueled an epidemic of obesity, and transformed food production throughout the world. The book changed the way millions of people think about what they eat and helped to launch today’s food movement

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal.

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal. New York Times Bestseller. Schlosser has a flair for dazzling scene-setting and an arsenal of startling facts. The book changed the way millions of people think about what they eat and helped to launch today’s food movement.

Fast Food Nation illuminates the horrifying truths of the fast food industry. Eric Schlosser uncovers the fast food industry's greed, unsanitary conditions, and almost criminally low wages. This book makes a strong case for avoiding fast food entirely. Schlosser reveals that the giant profits reported by fast food companies like McDonald's are made possible by the exploitation of underpaid employees who work in increasingly unsanitary and dangerous conditions. The book changed the way millions of people think about what they eat and helped to launch today’s food movement

Those who bring sunshine to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves.

Those who bring sunshine to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves. On Becoming Baby Wise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttime Sleep. 32 MB·31,879 Downloads. On Becoming Baby Wise Giving Your Infant - Gary Ezzo. pdf On Becoming Baby Wise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttim. Dietary Reference Intakes.

Originally published: New York : Houghton Mifflin, 2001. Includes bibliographical references (p. -361) and index

Originally published: New York : Houghton Mifflin, 2001. -361) and index. American way: Founding fathers - Your trusted friends - Behind the counter - Success - Meat and potatoes: Why the fries taste good - On the range - Cogs in the great machine - Most dangerous job - What's in the meat - Global realization - Epilogue: Have it your way -. - Afterword: Meaning of mad cow.


Stoneshaper
The reason I chose this book because it uncovers the horrors behind fast food besides the obvious health implications fast food has on people. I also chose it because it can relate to health class. I can talk my students about how easy it is for E-coli to develop and spread. All it takes is one time of not cleaning you knives or cutting board to get it. I can also talk to them about the importance of finding foods that are home grown by a farmer and doesn’t have any pesticides in it. Fresh meat, vegetables and fruits are healthier than processed food. This book relates so well with health implications because if other countries are gaining weight because of our fast food than fast food is the problem. We should try to stay away from it as much as possible if we want to live long and healthy lives.
Levion
Unlike the restaurants and food preparatory processes discussed, the statistics and case studies of Fast Food Nation are palatable. The book succeeds in taking a complex industry, introducing the reader to its history in the context of American industrial development, and disassembling it out by its major components. One of the more memorable sections of the book focuses on fast food employees, the growing standardization of their roles over time, and the extreme measures some companies pursue in order to avoid any consequences of hiring an inconsistent, unreliable workforce.
Fast Food Nation makes a great effort to identify many of the cultural, personal, and political issues in play within the fast food industry, though it does little to incite change. If the book presented concrete solutions, I do not recall many of them, it works better as a highlight reel of atrocity rather than a meditation on possible improvements. I read the book in 2012, 11 years after Fast Food Nation was originally published but I have failed to see any of the changes highlighted in the book taking hold. Democracy still appears to be smothered by special interests and lobbying, and despite other media emphasizing the horrifying state of our food industry we seem stuck in that same feedback loop.
Ultimately Fast Food Nation will open your eyes to many of the issues in the fast food industry, though perhaps the greatest lesson is how much more it will take to actually incite change.
Fesho
The purpose of this book, about the fast food industry, is best summarized by the author within the introduction: "I do not mean to suggest that fast food is solely responsible for every social problem now haunting the United States. In some cases (such as the malling and sprawling of the West) the fast food industry has been a catalyst and a symptom of larger economic trends. In other cases (such as the rise of franchising and the spread of obesity) fast food has played a more central role. By tracing the diverse influences of fast food I hope to shed light not only on the workings of an important industry, but also on a distinctively American way of viewing the world."

This book recounts the history behind the uprising of fast food to become a dominant force in our modern society. However, what most of us do not know is : "what lies behind the shiny, happy surface of every fast food transaction". Eric goes on to investigate every aspect of the fast food industry: people, cattle, vegetables, health etc. The storytelling techniques that he uses throughout the book bring this expose to life. The stories are descriptive, personal and touching.

A very educative and enlightening read, and a rude (much needed) awakening about the food industry in general and the fast food industry in particular.

Below are key excerpts from the book that I found particularly insightful:

"The history of the twentieth century was dominated by the struggle against totalitarian systems of state power. The twenty-first will no doubt be marked by a struggle to curtail excessive corporate power. The great challenge now facing countries throughout the world is how to find a proper balance between the efficiency and the amorality of the market."

"Today's fast food industry is the culmination of those larger social and economic trends. The low price of a fast food hamburger does not reflect its real cost - and should. the profits of the fast food chains have been made possible by losses imposed on the rest of society. The annual cost of obesity alone is now twice as large as the fast food industry's total revenues."

"The right pressure applied to the fast food industry in the right way could produce change faster than any act of Congress. The United Students Against Sweatshops and other activist groups have brought widespread attention to the child labor, low wages, and hazardous working conditions in Asian factories that make sneakers for Nike."

"Nobody in the United States is forced to buy fast food. The first steps toward meaningful change is by far the easiest: stop buying it. The executives who run the fast food industry are not bad men. They are businessmen. They will sell free-range, organic, grass-fed hamburgers if you demand it. They will sell whatever sells at a profit. The usefulness of the market, its effectiveness as a tool, cuts both ways."

"Whatever replaces the fast food industry should be regional, diverse, authentic, unpredictable, sustainable, profitable - and humble. It should know its limits. People can be fed without being fattened or deceived. This new century may bring an impatience with conformity, a refusal to be kept in the dark, less greed, more compassion, less speed, more common sense, a sense of humor about bran essences and loyalties, a view of food as more than just fuel. Things don't have to be the way they are. Despite all evidence to the contrary, I remain optimistic."