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by Charles Koburger
Download Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign, 1942-1943 fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Charles Koburger
  • ISBN:
    0275952363
  • ISBN13:
    978-0275952365
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Praeger; First Edition edition (October 10, 1995)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1901 kb
  • ePUB format
    1709 kb
  • DJVU format
    1895 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    269
  • Formats:
    rtf lit docx azw


Koburger argues that the many battles that constituted the campaign for the Solomons were the key to victory in the Pacific for the . Navy-not the battle of the Coral Sea or the Battle of Midway.

Koburger argues that the many battles that constituted the campaign for the Solomons were the key to victory in the Pacific for the . Segments of the, New Georgia, and Bougainville-have been written about extensively. But never before has the entire campaign been put together so lucidly and interpreted so well.

Pacific Turning Point book. Start by marking Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign, 1942-1943 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Koburger argues that the many battles that constituted the campaign.

Home Browse Books Book details, Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign . Koburger argues that the many battles that constituted the campaign for the Solomons were the key to victory in the Pacific for the .

Home Browse Books Book details, Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign,. Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign, 1942-1943. By Charles W. Koburger. The descriptions of the naval battles make for compelling reading.

Pacific turning point. the Solomons campaign, 1942-1943. Published 1995 by Praeger in Westport, Conn. Campaigns, World War, 1939-1945. Even in World War II, Koburger argues, the important naval struggles took place in the narrow seas.

Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign, 1942-1943 (Hardcover) by Charles W. Koburger

Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign, 1942-1943 (Hardcover) by Charles W. Turning Wood Turning Lathe. Koburger argues that the many battles that constituted the campaign for the Solomons were the key to victory in the Pacific for the U. ivan johnson. What others are saying. Pacific Turning Point: The Solomons Campaign, (Hardcover) by Charles W. Pacific+Turning+Point:+The+Solomons+Campaign,+1942-1943+(Hardcover)+by+Charles+W.

THE SOLOMONS CAMPAIGNS is perfectly balanced between riveting history, personal narratives, and . One of the best books on the Solomons Campaign that I have read. It covers both the sea and land battles and amphibious attacks.

THE SOLOMONS CAMPAIGNS is perfectly balanced between riveting history, personal narratives, and pleasing layout, packed with photos, maps, and illustrations. As the son of a Flotilla Five veteran of the Pacific, McGee's books are a fine tribute to all who served in that theater. It also covers the Guadalcanal land campaign and battles in great detail and the subsequent attacks up the Solomons towards other islands: Rendova, New Georgia, Vella Lavella, Bougainville, and so forth.

Most became doctrine in later Pacific campaigns

In Volume II of award-winning World War II military historian William L. McGee's acclaimed three-volume Pacific war series, the author covers all the Solomons Campaigns. the major turning point in the Pacific war. Part I, THE SOUTHERN SOLOMONS covers the bloody six-month struggle for Guadalcanal. Most became doctrine in later Pacific campaigns. 688 pp, 310 B/W photos, 44 maps, plus charts, notes, appendices, bibliography,index, Paperback 6" x 9". OTHER TITLES IN THE SERIES Vol. I, the amphibians are coming! Emergence of the Gator Navy and its Revolutionary Landing Craft Vol.

Koburger argues that the many battles that constituted the campaign for the Solomons were the key to victory in the Pacific for the U.S. Navy―not the battle of the Coral Sea or the Battle of Midway. Segments of the campaign―Guadalcanal, New Georgia, and Bougainville―have been written about extensively. But never before has the entire campaign been put together so lucidly and interpreted so well. The descriptions of the naval battles make for compelling reading. Even in World War II, Koburger argues, the important naval struggles took place in the narrow seas.


Jare
Writing on history has evolved a lot in the last 50 years. It may have been acceptable so many years ago for military history to be presented as compilations of dates and statistics. But History has changed thanks to guys like Ken Burns and Michael Shaara. Ultimately, war is about people: their causes, experiences, sufferings, and elevations. It's a little shocking too that Charles Koburger could have published Pacific Turning Point as late as 1995. Koburger's book hasn't the least of that contemporary, human-focused feel. His text reads like a poorly written sports page - he presents ships sunk in terms of lost tonnage, rather than lives.

Koburger takes what is arguably one of the most wrenching phases of WWII in the Pacific, and bleaches it of all color, life, and especially death. By focusing almost exclusively on the maritime, aerial, and particularly statistical aspects of the Solomon Islands campaign, he renders the now infamous experiences of Marine, Army, and Imperial Japanese infantry units almost as footnotes. He's apparently oblivious to the fact that with every ship sunk, hundreds of men died of drowning, burns, exposure, or became fodder for sharks. I'm not trying to be morose - I'm trying to highlight something that by the grace of contemporary historians we should all know: war isn't baseball. And those who write professionally about war ought to be at least as engaged and compelling as those who write or broadcast professionally about baseball. If you buy this book, you'll wish you hadn't.
Rocksmith
This was a short overview look at the Solomons campaign. The writitng style was amatuerish and could have used an editor. It reads like a undergraduate term paper. Two of the maps were transposed as well. Still, it provides a good introduction to the campaign. Wilmott's 'The War with Japan' was a better history, but did not offer as much specific detail on this campaign.