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by Jeffrey L. Kosky,Jean-Luc Marion
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Jeffrey L. Kosky,Jean-Luc Marion
  • ISBN:
    0226505383
  • ISBN13:
    978-0226505381
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  • Publisher:
    University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 15, 1999)
  • Pages:
    388 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
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Expertly translated by Jeffrey Kosky, this .

Expertly translated by Jeffrey Kosky, this work will appeal to historians of philosophy, students of religion, and anyone interested in the genealogy of contemporary thought and its contradictions. Jean-Luc Marion, member of the Académie française,nbsp;is emeritus professor of philosophy at the Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). He is the Andrew Thomas Greeley and Grace McNichols Greeley Professor of Catholic Studies, professor of the philosophy of religions and theology, and professor in the Committee on Social Thought and the Department of Philosophy at the University of Chicago.

These questions form the point of departure for Jean-Luc Marion’s groundbreaking study of Cartesian thought

These questions form the point of departure for Jean-Luc Marion’s groundbreaking study of Cartesian thought. Analyses of Descartes’ notion of the ego and his idea of God show that if Descartes represents the fullest example of metaphysics, he no less transgresses its limits. Expertly translated by Jeffrey Kosky, this work will appeal to historians of philosophy, students of religion, and anyone interested in the genealogy of contemporary thought and its contradictions.

Personal Name: Descartes, René, 1596-1650 Contributions in metaphysics. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. by Anthony Robert Rowley. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database.

These questions form the point of departure for Jean-Luc Marion's groundbreaking study of Cartesian thought. Jeffrey L. Kosky (e. University of Chicago Press (1999). Similar books and articles

These questions form the point of departure for Jean-Luc Marion's groundbreaking study of Cartesian thought. Analyses of Descartes'. Similar books and articles. On Descartes' Metaphysical Prism: The Constitution and the Limits of Onto-Theo-Logy in Cartesian Thought. Jean-Luc Marion - 1999 - University of Chicago Press. Levinas and the Philosophy of Religion. Kosky - 2001 - Indiana University Press. On the Role of Metaphysics in Descartes' Thought. Marcelo Dascal - 1971 - Man and World 4 (4):460-469. Descartes' Occluded Metaphysics.

Jean-Luc Marion, member of the Académie française, is emeritus professor of philosophy at the Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). He is the Andrew Thomas Greeley and Grace McNichols Greeley Professor of Catholic Studies, professor of the philosophy of religions and theology, an. . He also holds the Dominique Dubarle chair at the Institut Catholique of Paris

On Descartes' Metaphysical Prism book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

On Descartes' Metaphysical Prism book. Start by marking On Descartes' Metaphysical Prism: The Constitution and the Limits of Onto-theo-logy in Cartesian Thought as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

8 Marion, Jean-Luc, On Descartes' Metaphysical Prism: The Constitution and the Limits of.At least, something might be gained from pondering the reasons for Marion's more stringent standard of nonidolatrous thinking.

8 Marion, Jean-Luc, On Descartes' Metaphysical Prism: The Constitution and the Limits of Onto-Theo-Logy in Cartesian Thought, trans. 10 See, for example, Marion's early Augustinian articles, such as Distance et béatitude: Sur le mot capacitas chez Saint Augustin, Résurrection 29 (1968): 58–80 and La saisie trinitaire selon l'Esprit de saint Augustin, Résurrection 28 (1968): 66–94, and his 1986 text Prolegomena to Charity, trans.

God without Being (1991) and On Descartes’ Metaphysical Prism (1999) . Among those rare bodies of thought that are reborn from one century to the next.

God without Being (1991) and On Descartes’ Metaphysical Prism (1999), both published by the University o f Chicago Press. that of Descartes, powerful in its enigmatic simplicity, at once apparent and real, makes the most intimate contact with con­ temporary philosophy. This, then, is one of Marion’s aims: to put Descartes in dialogue with the philosophy of the twentieth century.

Does Descartes belong to metaphysics? What do we mean when we say "metaphysics"? These questions form the point of departure for Jean-Luc Marion's groundbreaking study of Cartesian thought

Does Descartes belong to metaphysics? What do we mean when we say "metaphysics"? These questions form the point of departure for Jean-Luc Marion's groundbreaking study of Cartesian thought. Analyses of Descartes' notion of the ego and his idea of God show that if Descartes represents the fullest example of metaphysics, he no less transgresses its limits. Writing as philosopher and historian of philosophy, Marion uses Heidegger's concept of metaphysics to interpret the Cartesian corpus-an interpretation strangely omitted from Heidegger's own history of philosophy.

Does Descartes belong to metaphysics? What do we mean when we say "metaphysics"? These questions form the point of departure for Jean-Luc Marion's groundbreaking study of Cartesian thought. Analyses of Descartes' notion of the ego and his idea of God show that if Descartes represents the fullest example of metaphysics, he no less transgresses its limits. Writing as philosopher and historian of philosophy, Marion uses Heidegger's concept of metaphysics to interpret the Cartesian corpus—an interpretation strangely omitted from Heidegger's own history of philosophy. This interpretation complicates and deepens the Heideggerian concept of metaphysics, a concept that has dominated twentieth-century philosophy. Examinations of Descartes' predecessors (Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Suarez) and his successors (Leibniz, Spinoza, and Hegel) clarify the meaning of the Cartesian revolution in philosophy. Expertly translated by Jeffrey Kosky, this work will appeal to historians of philosophy, students of religion, and anyone interested in the genealogy of contemporary thought and its contradictions.