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by William Bryan Martin,Clifford Chalmers Cain
Download Down to Earth: Religious Paths toward Custodianship of Nature fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    William Bryan Martin,Clifford Chalmers Cain
  • ISBN:
    0761846875
  • ISBN13:
    978-0761846871
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    UPA (May 16, 2009)
  • Pages:
    172 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1154 kb
  • ePUB format
    1583 kb
  • DJVU format
    1443 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    121
  • Formats:
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Clifford Chalmers Cain is professor of philosophy and religion at Franklin College in Franklin, Indiana. Cain holds two doctoral degrees and has written books and scholarly articles in the fields of contemporary theology, ecology, religion, and science.

Clifford Chalmers Cain is professor of philosophy and religion at Franklin College in Franklin, Indiana.

Clifford Cain, William Bryan Martin. Down to Earth scientifically describes the multitude of environmental problems besetting planet earth and indicates why these environmental problems are, at their root, a spiritual or religious challenge.

by Clifford Chalmers Cain. This book scientifically describes the multitude of environmental problems besetting planet earth and indicates why these environmental problems are, at their root, a spiritual or religious challenge. The author argues that learning the scientific descriptions of problems is not enough; attitudes must be changed and behavioral patterns must be altered.

Down to Earth scientifically describes the multitude of environmental problems besetting planet earth and indicates why these environmental problems are, at their root, a spiritual or religious challenge. Simply learning about the scientific description of these environmental threats will not be sufficient to solve them, the author argues, for attitudes must be changed and behavioral patterns must be altered. This need for change invariably confronts the core values that we hold and the routine actions that we undertake.

Religious studies scholarship, both implicitly and explicitly, has often been categorized as a more primitive animist spiritual practice as opposed to. .Cain C (2009) Down to earth: religious paths toward custodianship of nature. University Press of America, LanhamGoogle Scholar.

Religious studies scholarship, both implicitly and explicitly, has often been categorized as a more primitive animist spiritual practice as opposed to a true religion. This dichotomy has been most marked in Western-influenced scholarship. However, with an emerging focus on non-formal religious practices and consciousness of the problematic nature of the Earth crisis, there is a growing corpus of literature dealing with issues at the intersection of religion and ecology.

Down to Earth, Religious Paths toward Custodianship of Nature – By Clifford Chalmers Cain.

Down to earth: religious paths toward custodianship of nature. 2009, University Press of America.

The Custodians were originally designed to function as robotic servants and workers, simplifying everyday life for their human creators by performing menial tasks. As their creators retreated into lives of leisure and comfort made possible by increasing levels of automation, the Custodians were gradually assigned higher and higher level functions in human society.

Down to Earth scientifically describes the multitude of environmental problems besetting planet earth and indicates why these environmental problems are, at their root, a spiritual or religious challenge. Simply learning about the scientific description of these environmental threats will not be sufficient to solve them, the author argues, for attitudes must be changed and behavioral patterns must be altered. This need for change invariably confronts the core values that we hold and the routine actions that we undertake. Through an examination of the worldviews and sacred texts of eight spiritual traditions, we learn of the common insights and powerful resources that these world religions can offer. The author believes that it is necessary to join an ecological conscience to an ecological consciousness for humans to exercise custodianship of nature both responsibly and sustainably.