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by John T. Soister
Download Up from the Vault: Rare Thrillers of the 1920s and 1930s fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    John T. Soister
  • ISBN:
    0786449233
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786449231
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    McFarland (July 1, 2010)
  • Pages:
    248 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1598 kb
  • ePUB format
    1628 kb
  • DJVU format
    1762 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    519
  • Formats:
    lrf docx doc mobi


There are a few, however, that remain elusive to most, if not all, movie buffs. Bibliographic information. Up from the Vault: Rare Thrillers of the 1920s and 1930s. illustrated, reprint.

Up from the Vault book. There are a few, however, that remain elusive to most, if not all, movie buffs.

There are a few, however, that remain elusive to most, if not all, movie buffs. 1936), The Scarab Murder Case (1937), and Sh! The Octopus (1937).

John Soister is one of the most enjoyable writers on horor films writing today, and he had to be to make this book work. John Soister is one of the most enjoyable writers on horor films writing today, and he had to be to make this book work. The choice of films covered is, to say the least, eccentric- thrillers that are lost or difficult to see. Many are not just lost, or existing only in museums, but quite obscure films which left no significant footprints in film history. This book is worth getting because of the charm and wit of John Soister's writing.

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That version was a live electronic music mix to a 71 minutes copy from the Cinémathèque vault. a b Soister, John T. (2004). Download as PDF. Printable version.

rare thrillers of the 1920s and 1930s. Published 2004 by McFarland Publishers in Jefferson, . Motion pictures, Thrillers (Motion pictures, television, et., Catalogs, Thrillers (Motion pictures). This book covers 21 thrillers from those decades that are well-regarded and eagerly sought, but difficult to find-The Mystery of Dr. Fu Manchu (1923), The Unknown Purple (1923), The Sorrows of Satan (1926), While London Sleeps (1926), The Monkey Talks (1927), The Chinese Parrot (1927), Stark Mad (1929).

Up from the Vault: Rare thrillers of the 1920s and 1930s. p. 133. ^ "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour: The Monkey's Paw - A Retelling (1965) - Robert Stevens - Synopsis, Characteristics, Moods, Themes and Related". "BBC Radio 4 Extra - Christopher Lee's Fireside Tales, The Monkey's Paw".

Soister, John T. Podcast of "The Monkey's Paw" as read by John Lithgow. Books That Grow leveled book.

A number of thrillers made in the 1920s and 1930s have become available again thanks to new technology. There are a few, however, that remain elusive to most, if not all, movie buffs. This book covers 21 thrillers from those decades that are well-regarded and eagerly sought, but difficult to find--The Mystery of Dr. Fu Manchu (1923), The Unknown Purple (1923), The Sorrows of Satan (1926), While London Sleeps (1926), The Monkey Talks (1927), The Chinese Parrot (1927), Stark Mad (1929), The Unholy Night (1929), High Treason (1929), The Spider (1931), Eran Trece (1931), The Monkey's Paw (1933), Trick for Trick (1933), Deluge (1933), The Vanishing Shadow (1934), The Witching Hour (1934), Double Door (1934), Black Moon (1934), Le Golem (1936), The Scarab Murder Case (1937), and Sh! The Octopus (1937). For each film, the author provides such details as the production company, running time, release date(s), cast and production credits, a synopsis, and commentary.

Kazijora
John Soister's "Up From the Vault" is a scholarly review of obscure horror movies from the late silent period to the early thirties. I mean, these are some wierd flicks! Culled from the terror-genre, Soister's book scans rare thrillers and mysteries, with information found no-where else. The author travelled to London's BFI(British Film Institute) to inspect damaged nitrates(on a Movieola) of the 1923 "Mystery of Dr. Fu Manchu", which almost no-one-else has ever seen. Using web-sites, archives, and libraries, Soister has captured complete story-lines, full casts, and detailed minutiae on 21 films, half of which are lost; the rest residing in arcane collectors' libraries; some surface rarely on Turner Classic Movies. One film, "The Chinese Parrot(1927)", is the second American effort of legendary German director Paul Leni, and it's only the second screen appearance of Earl Derr Bigger's Charlie Chan. The first Chan movie("House Without a Key") was a ten-chapter serial. Paul Leni died suddenly in 1929 of blood poisoning from an ulcerated tooth. Soister's book provides seven pages of critique, background, and pictures from the mysterious "Chinese Parrot". It is remarkable, as this film turned to dust long ago. An early RKO C. Aubrey Smith thriller, "The Monkey's Paw", is reviewed, featuring casting notes, production history, and two photos from the film, featuring a seductive young Nena Quatero. This tantilizing report is on a 1933 motion picture that no longer exists. Another entry is MGM's 1929 "The Unholy Night", an historic, early talkie directed by actor Lionel Barrymore, and featuring a nervous Boris Karloff as Abdoul. A slow film with a good ending, I saw "The Unholy Night" on TCM cable. It has never been on VHS or DVD. Roland West directed the classic "The Bat(1926)" and "The Bat Whispers(1930)"; both of which were, at one time, lost. Archivists have recovered both famous films. An even earlier Roland West production, "The Unknown Purple(1923)", featuring an invisible man, has been lost forever. "Up From the Vault" contains a complete review, and a picture from "The Unknown Purple". Not for everyone, "Up From the Vault" is a cinephile's delight; the author's detective work cannot be faulted. John Soister's effort here is heart-felt and pure. And, after all, work is joy if you love it.
Xangeo
John Soister is one of the most enjoyable writers on horor films writing today, and he had to be to make this book work. The choice of films covered is, to say the least, eccentric-- thrillers that are lost or difficult to see. Many are not just lost, or existing only in museums, but quite obscure films which left no significant footprints in film history.

This book is worth getting because of the charm and wit of John Soister's writing. He makes us you care about movies you have never heard of.
Tygralbine
While I certainly find the subject matter of this book interesting, it is an extremely tough read given the author's writing style. I made myself slog through it given my interest in the subject matter, but it was exhausting, to say the least.