» » The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought

Download The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought fb2

by Ben-Ami Scharfstein
Download The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Ben-Ami Scharfstein
  • ISBN:
    0195059271
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195059274
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (April 20, 1989)
  • Pages:
    496 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1397 kb
  • ePUB format
    1684 kb
  • DJVU format
    1765 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    291
  • Formats:
    doc lrf rtf docx


Personal Name: Scharfstein, Ben-Ami, 1919-. Publication, Distribution, et. Oxford (C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Personal Name: Scharfstein, Ben-Ami, 1919-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Ben-Ami Scharfstein contends that personal experience, especially that of childhood, affects philosophers' sense of reality and hence the content of their philosophies. He bases his argument on biographical studies of twenty great philosophers, beginning with Descartes and ending with Wittgenstein and Sartre. Taken together, these studies provide the beginnings of a psychological history of the philosophy of the period. Scharfstein first focuses on the philosophers' efforts to arrive at the objective truth and to persuade themselves and others of its existence.

But a comparison of their lives and fortunes and misfortunes with their abstract thought shows how misled these philosophers . He also discusses the nature of truth and methods of persuasion. This covers the first 123 pages.

But a comparison of their lives and fortunes and misfortunes with their abstract thought shows how misled these philosophers have been. As I write toward the end of the book, "Neither art, philosophy, nor science alone is adequate to understand or express human experience. After this elongated introduction, the author goes into each of the major modern philosophers in-turn, starting with Rene Descartes.

Oxford University Press. The Philosophers : Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought: Their Lives. By Ben-Ami Scharfstein Professor of Philosophy Tel-Aviv University.

Ben-Ami Scharfstein contends that personal experience, especially that of childhood, affects philosophies. Taken together, these studies This highly readable volume offers a broad introduction to modern philosophy and philosophers. Ben-Ami Scharfstein contends that personal experience, especially that of childhood, affects philosophies

But a comparison of their lives and fortunes and misfortunes with their abstract thought shows how misled these philosophers have been. Life would be more intellectually rewarding if artists and scientists were were more effectively interested in philosophy, and philosophers more effectively in art and science.

Author: Ben-Ami Scharfstein.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature .

Home Browse Books Book details, The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature o. .The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of Their Thought. By Ben-Ami Scharfstein. Ben-Ami Scharfstein contends that personal experience, especially that of childhood, affects philosophers' sense of reality and hence the content of their philosophies. He bases his argumenton biographical studies of twenty great philosophers, beginning with Descartes and ending with Wittgenstein and Sartre.

Similar books and articles. Ben-Ami Scharfstein - 1980 - Oxford University Press

Similar books and articles. Ben-Ami Scharfstein - 1980 - Oxford University Press. I. Grattan-Guinness, Ben-Ami Scharfstein & Peter Loptson - 1983 - History and Philosophy of Logic 4 (1-2):221-224. Roots of Bergson's Philosophy. Ben-Ami Scharfstein - 1943 - New York: Columbia University Press. Ben-Ami Scharfstein - 1988 - The Monist 71 (3):455-465. Salvation by Paradox: On Zen and Zen-Like Thought. Ben-ami Scharfstein - 1976 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (3):209-234. Luitzen Brouwer and the Snake.

This highly readable volume offers a broad introduction to modern philosophy and philosophers. Ben-Ami Scharfstein contends that personal experience, especially that of childhood, affects philosophers' sense of reality and hence the content of their philosophies. He bases his argument on biographical studies of twenty great philosophers, beginning with Descartes and ending with Wittgenstein and Sartre. Taken together, these studies provide the beginnings of a psychological history of the philosophy of the period. Scharfstein first focuses on the philosophers' efforts to arrive at the objective truth and to persuade themselves and others of its existence. He then explores truth and relevance, both proposing the broadening of the traditional philosophical conception of relevance and considering philosophers' need to create something that belongs to and transcends them as individuals.

Soustil
It may have been only an odd mistake that led Amazon to invite me to review my own book, which was published 26 years ago, in 1980. Because I am often critical of my books, I am somewhat surprised by how much I continue to take pleasure in this one. I value it as a still uniquely detailed, sober, and yet imaginative argument meant to persuade--really persuade--philosophers and lovers of philosophy that it is unreasonable to interpret philosopohical views without considering the lives and emotions of the philosophers who created them. Most philosophers have had a stubborn but understandable prejudice against such an attempt, which they label, as if it were a fallacy, "psychologism." But a comparison of their lives and fortunes and misfortunes with their abstract thought shows how misled these philosophers have been. As I write toward the end of the book, "Neither art, philosophy, nor science alone is adequate to understand or express human experience. Life would be more intellectually rewarding if artists and scientists were were more effectively interested in philosophy, and philosophers more effectively in art and science."

Although excellent biographies of individual philosophers were published later than The Philosophers, the work I did on it was thoroughgoing,so it has not aged. And since I followed no current intellectual fashion, it has not gone out of fashion. I believe that the pleasure I took in writing my book is still infectious, and the care with which I developed my themes is still yields illuminatiion. Not without pride, I award my book the five stars I am sure is its due.
Taulkree
Book in very good condition
Purestone
In 1926 Alexander Herzberg published a book, later translated into English under the title of The Psychology of Philosophers (which I have reviewed on Amazon). He examined the personalities of thity philosophers. Thirteen of these also figure in Scharfstein’s 1980 examination of twenty-two philosophers. What emerges from the two studies of these two studies is that a striking number of these thirty-nine philosophers lost one or both parents before the age of seven; were ineffective in their social relationships; complained of social isolation and loneliness; were paranoid or hypochondriacal; suffered from more or less prolonged periods of clinical or even suicidal; depression; were unmarried; were notoriously aggressive in contact with others; were quarrelsome and quick to take offence; were usually ineffective in practical and financial matters; and were interested in the very things they were not good at (such as politics and ethics). There is a suggestion that philosophical activity is likely to be psychopathological – and indeed Herzberg, who was a psychotherapist as well as a philosopher, had provided Freudian perspectives in his discussion.

All of this is certainly interesting, but I wonder what conclusions, if any, one might draw from this material. To start with, twenty-two philosophers are a very small sample: there must be many hundreds of philosophers who show no such psychological traits in their private lives. Then there is no control group to compare with the group of philosophers. A random sample of humanity might very well produce a similar breakdown in many of the traits listed. For example, one wonders how many political journalists (not to mention ordinary people who pontificate about politics) would themselves be competent politicians; or what proportion of a random sample of the population would be inhibited in some way or another, be socially ineffective, financially incompetent, depressed, aggressive or quick to take offence.

But, above all, what is important, surely, is not whether the PERSONALITIES show signs of psychopathology, but whether these signs are present in their writings. Sometimes they obviously are: Nietzsche is an obvious case in point; but Rousseau’s undoubtedly pathological personality and his inability or unwillingness to bring up his children do not in themselves make his theories on education pathological. And even when the philosophy itself shows signs of embodying some neurotic thinking, as perhaps in Schopenhauer, it will often have a kernel, and sometimes a good deal more than a kernel, of truth in it.
Ballardana
While psycho-analyses of people is something I generally shy away from, Ben-Ami Sharfstein has completed a fascinating string of case-studies. What makes it interesting is that the "subjects" are the greatest philosophers who have ever lived.

Sharfstein begins with some general observations about the psychological welfare of philosophers in general. He then goes on to discuss some patterns that he finds in the different personas. He also discusses the nature of truth and methods of persuasion. This covers the first 123 pages.

After this elongated introduction, the author goes into each of the major modern philosophers in-turn, starting with Rene Descartes. Some of his favorites (Kant, Nietzsche) get 20+ pages devoted to them, while most of the personages get around 10 pages on their biography.

Nietzsche once said that one can tell a lot about the philosophy by the life of the philosopher. Scharfstein takes this to heart and briefly examines aspects of each individual's philosophy via the lens of their lives. He examines different aspects such as their childhoods (and the relationship they had w/their parents), their relationships with women as well as major life / traumatic events. All factor in to influencing how a philosopher thinks.

If you want a good book that deals with the psychological factors of philsophers, this is a great place to start. Sharfstein does not over-play his hand and I found his commentary to be insightful and reasonable. This is a very well thought-out book.
Goktilar
I really enjoyed this book. The apologetic, defensive introduction was a bit long and a bit strained. But the idea that a philosopher's life has a direct relation to his philosophy should be a given. I am surprised that there are not several more works of this type. The author does a great job but even without his psychological analysis the facts exposed about the personal lives is worth the price of the book alone. If you are looking for a new way to peek an old interest in philosophy and the philosophers this is a great one. I don't know how I found this book but I am glad that I did.

Richard Edward Noble:

"Hobo-ing America: A Workingman's Tour of the U.S.A.."