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Download Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self fb2

by Yingchi Chu
Download Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Yingchi Chu
  • ISBN:
    0700717463
  • ISBN13:
    978-0700717460
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (December 6, 2002)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1964 kb
  • ePUB format
    1799 kb
  • DJVU format
    1308 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    712
  • Formats:
    doc azw mbr lit


Home Browse Books Book details, Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self. Examining Hong Kong cinema from its inception in 1913 to the end of the colonial era, this work explains the key areas of production, market, film products and critical traditions.

Home Browse Books Book details, Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self. Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self. By Yingchi Chu. No cover image. Hong Kong Cinema considers the different political formations of Hong Kong's culture as seen through the cinema, and deals with the historical, political, economic and cultural relations between Hong Kong cinema and other Chinese film industries on the mainland, as well as in Taiwan and South-East Asia.

Publication, Distribution, et. London ; New York Hong Kong cinema as part of Chinese national cinema, 1913-56 Hong Kong cinema as Chinese diasporic cinema, 1956-79 Hong Kong film production, market and criticism, 1979-97 Hong Kong films : the cultural specificity of quasi-national film Hong Kong films : cinematic constructions of Hong Kong history and territory Hong Kong films : cinematic constructions of Hong Kong's quasi-national identity Hong. Kong cinema after 1997. Rubrics: Motion picture industry China Hong Kong History Motion pictures. Download now Hong Kong cinema : coloniser, motherland and self Yingchi Chu.

Hong Kong Cinema book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Hong Kong Cinema is an ambitious, thought-provoking book and contains some fascinating material on the film industry in 1980-2000. Examining Hong Kong cinema from its inception in 1913 to the end of the colonial era, this work explains the key areas of production, market, film products and critical traditions

Examining Hong Kong cinema from its inception in 1913 to the end of the colonial era, this work explains the key areas of production, market, film products and critical traditions.

Examining Hong Kong cinema from its inception in 1913 to the end of the colonial era, this work explains the key areas of production, market, film products and critical traditions. Categories: Art\Cinema.

Cinemaya 'Hong Kong Cinema is an ambitious, thought-provoking book and contains some fascinating . Yingchi Chu is a lecturer in Chinese and Film Studies at the School of Asian Studies, Murdoch University, Western Australia.

Cinemaya 'Hong Kong Cinema is an ambitious, thought-provoking book and contains some fascinating material on the film industry in 1980-2000.

Hong Kong cinema: Colonizer, motherland, and self. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Lost in transition: Hong Kong culture in the age of China. Albany: State University of New York Press. Gregory, Derek, and Allan Pred (ed. Violent geographies: Fear, terror, and political violence.

Australian scholar Yingchi Chu's book, Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self, contributes to this . Hong Kong Cinema is a brief but ambitious book.

Australian scholar Yingchi Chu's book, Hong Kong Cinema: Coloniser, Motherland and Self, contributes to this growing trend. In less than 150 pages, it tries to map out the entire history of the cinema, from the 1910s to developments after the 1997 takeover. The book draws on a provocative conceptual framework to provide a sweeping overview of Hong Kong cinema and offers some fascinating observations on the industry. However, the book needs further revisions to bring out its rich potential. Export citation Request permission.

Yingchi Chu is a lecturer in Chinese and Film Studies at the School of Asian Studies, Murdoch University, Western .

Yingchi Chu is a lecturer in Chinese and Film Studies at the School of Asian Studies, Murdoch University, Western Australia.

Examining Hong Kong cinema from its inception in 1913 to the end of the colonial era, this work explains the key areas of production, market, film products and critical traditions. Hong Kong Cinema considers the different political formations of Hong Kong's culture as seen through the cinema, and deals with the historical, political, economic and cultural relations between Hong Kong cinema and other Chinese film industries on the mainland, as well as in Taiwan and South-East Asia. Discussion covers the concept of 'national cinema' in the context of Hong Kong's status as a quasi-nation with strong links to both the 'motherland' (China) and the 'coloniser' (Britain), and also argues that Hong Kong cinema is a national cinema only in an incomplete and ambiguous sense.