» » Martin Scorsese's America

Download Martin Scorsese's America fb2

by Ellis Cashmore
Download Martin Scorsese's America fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Ellis Cashmore
  • ISBN:
    0745645232
  • ISBN13:
    978-0745645230
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Polity; 1 edition (November 9, 2009)
  • Pages:
    200 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1838 kb
  • ePUB format
    1166 kb
  • DJVU format
    1651 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    423
  • Formats:
    mbr mobi lit lrf


Ellis Cashmore's Martin Scorsese's America probes the cinematic oeuvre of one of the world's major film directors, ferreting out his recurrent themes, obsessions, and visions of contemporary life in the United States.

Ellis Cashmore's Martin Scorsese's America probes the cinematic oeuvre of one of the world's major film directors, ferreting out his recurrent themes, obsessions, and visions of contemporary life in the United States. Capturing the variety and diversity of Scorsese's work, Cashmore provides an illuminating portrait of a major cineaste and makes the case that Scorsese should be seen as one of the great . directors whose visions of American life are as incisive and insightful as many great literary artists. Douglas Kellner, UCLA.

Martin Scorsese's America book. Author of Tyson: Nurture of the Beast and Beckham, Ellis Cashmore turns his attention to arguably the most influentialliving film- maker to explore how Scorsese envisions America. Greed, manhood, the city and romantic love feature on Scorsese'slandscape of secular materialism. They are among the themesCashmore argues have driven and inform Scorsese's work. This isAmerica, as seen through the eyes of Martin Scorsese and it is adeeply unpleasant place.

For over four decades, Martin Scorsese has been the chronicler of an obsessive society, where material possessions and physical comfort are valued, where the pursuit of individual improvement is rewarded and where male prerogative is respected and preserved. Scorsese has often described his films as sociology and he has a point: his storytelling condenses complex information into comprehensible narratives about society.

In his new book Martin Scorsese’s America, Ellis Cashmore has anatomized Scorsese’s film, not just his dramas, like GoodFellas and Raging Bull, but his documentaries like No Direction Home (about Bob Dylan) and his television program Mirror, Mirror, which he directed fo. .

In his new book Martin Scorsese’s America, Ellis Cashmore has anatomized Scorsese’s film, not just his dramas, like GoodFellas and Raging Bull, but his documentaries like No Direction Home (about Bob Dylan) and his television program Mirror, Mirror, which he directed for Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories. This is the first comprehensive examination of Scorsese’s entire oeuvre and the first attempt to explain the clasp Scorsese has had on the hearts and minds of filmgoers. This city doesn’t discriminate: it gets everybody Frank Pierce (Nicolas Cage) in Bringing Out the Dead.

Martin Scorsese's America. Cashmore's book discloses how, collectively, Scorsese's films present an image of America

Martin Scorsese's America. PALS-Polity America Through the Lens series. Cashmore's book discloses how, collectively, Scorsese's films present an image of America. It's an image assembled from the perspectives of obsessive people, whether burned-out paramedics, compulsive entrepreneurs, tortured lovers, or celebrity-fixated comedians. It's collected from pool halls, taxicabs, boxing rings and jazz clubs. It's an image that's specific, yet ubiquitous. It is Martin Scorsese's America.

Ellis Cashmore (10 February 1949 in Staffordshire, Great Britain) is a British sociologist and cultural critic. He is currently a visiting professor of sociology at Aston. Before teaching at Aston, he used to teach culture, media and sport at Staffordshire University, starting in 1993. Before 1993, he taught sociology at the University of Tampa, Florida; and, before this, he was a lecturer in sociology at the University of Hong Kong.

Cashmore's book discloses how, collectively, Scorsese's films present an image of America.

Similar books and articles. Martin Scorsese's Invisible City in Bringing Out the Dead. The Hands That Built America: A Class-Politics Appreciation of Martin Scorsese's The Gangs of New York. Bryan Palmer - 2003 - Historical Materialism 11 (4):317-345. Discussione su "Al di là della vita" di Martin Scorsese. Umberto Curi - 2000 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 13 (1):173-180. The Departed di Martin Scorsese. Gloria Origgi & Andrea Panzavolta - 2007 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 20 (1):177-186. Linguistic Coding in the Films of Martin Scorsese. Marion W. Weiss - 1985 - Semiotica 55 (3-4):185-194.

For over four decades, Martin Scorsese has been the chronicler ofan obsessive society, where material possessions and physicalcomfort are valued, where the pursuit of individual improvement isrewarded and where male prerogative is respected and preserved.

Scorsese has often described his films as sociology and he has apoint: his storytelling condenses complex information intocomprehensible narratives about society. In this sense, he has beena guide through a dark world of nineteenth century crypto-fascismto a fetishistic twentieth century in which goods, fame, money andpower are held to have magical power.

Author of Tyson: Nurture of the Beast and Beckham,Ellis Cashmore turns his attention to arguably the most influentialliving film- maker to explore how Scorsese envisions America.Greed, manhood, the city and romantic love feature on Scorsese'slandscape of secular materialism. They are among the themesCashmore argues have driven and inform Scorsese's work. This isAmerica, as seen through the eyes of Martin Scorsese and it is adeeply unpleasant place.

Cashmore's book discloses how, collectively, Scorsese's filmspresent an image of America. It's an image assembled from theperspectives of obsessive people, whether burned-out paramedics,compulsive entrepreneurs, tortured lovers, or celebrity-fixatedcomedians. It's collected from pool halls, taxicabs, boxing ringsand jazz clubs. It's an image that's specific, yet ubiquitous. Itis Martin Scorsese's America.