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by Doris L. Bergen
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Doris L. Bergen
  • ISBN:
    0807845604
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807845608
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The University of North Carolina Press; 2nd ed. edition (March 4, 1996)
  • Pages:
    358 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1256 kb
  • ePUB format
    1263 kb
  • DJVU format
    1364 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    256
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In Twisted Cross, Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 .

In Twisted Cross, Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 self-described 'German Christians,' who sought to expunge all Jewish elements from the Christian church. Bergen refutes the notion that the German Christians were a marginal group and demonstrates that members occupied key positions within the Protestant church even after their agenda was rejected by the Nazi leadership. Extending her analysis into the postwar period, Bergen shows how the German Christians were relatively easily reincorporated into mainstream church life after 1945.

In Twisted Cross, Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 . The German Christian movement parallels the postmodern church of our present day.

In Twisted Cross, Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 self-described "German Christians", who sought to expunge all Jewish elements from the Christian church. In a process that became more daring as Nazi plans for genocide unfolded, this group of Protestant lay people and clergy rejected the Old Testament, ousted people defined as non-Aryans from their congregations, denied the Jewish ancestry of Jesus, and removed Hebrew words like "Hallelujah" from hymns.

Twisted Cross book In "Twisted Cross, " Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 self-described.

Start by marking Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In "Twisted Cross, " Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 self-described "German Christians, " who sought to expunge all Jewish elements from the Christian church. In a process that became more daring as Nazi plans for genocide unfolded, this group of Protestant lay people a How did Germany's Christians respond to Nazism?

The German Christians were a relatively small but highly disruptive element within .

The German Christians were a relatively small but highly disruptive element within German Protestantism that pursued the goal of harmonizing Christianity (or what they understood Christianity to be) with National Socialism. Their project was to "arianise" both Holy Scripture and the person of Jesus Christ-in short, to rid traditional Christianity of all putatively Jewish components. Bergen shows that several strands in German intellectual history were bound together in the German Christian movement.

Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich (University of North Carolina Press, 1996). The Sword of the Lord: Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Centuries (University of Notre Dame Press, 2004). From generation to generation (2008). The Holocaust: A New History (History Press Ltd, 2009). Alltag im Holocaust: Jüdisches Leben im Großdeutschen Reich 1941–1945 (Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag: 2013). War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016).

In Twisted Cross, Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 self-described 'German Christians, ' who sought to expunge all Jewish elements from the Christian church.

In "Twisted Cross, " Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 self-described "German Christians, " who sought to expunge all Jewish elements from the Christian church.

next page Page ii. Twisted Cross The German Christian Movement in. . Twisted Cross The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich. Preface Why write a book about the "German Christians" (Deutsche Christen), a group of pro-Nazi Protestants in the Third Reich? While working in the Community Archive in Minden, I came across some correspondence that led me to contemplate my motives. Rather, parallels between German Christian thought and Nazi criticisms of it reflect the fact that both grew out of German culture of the post-World War I period.

Bergen, Doris L. Bibliographic Citation. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996. War and genocide: a concise history of the holocaust . Bergen, Doris L. (2009). Related Items in Google Scholar.

The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich. In: Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis. 1997 ; Vol. 110, No. 3. pp. 412. cle{97a400eecf78, title "Twisted Cross. Bergen (1997) Twisted Cross.

How did Germany's Christians respond to Nazism? In Twisted Cross, Doris Bergen addresses one important element of this response by focusing on the 600,000 self-described 'German Christians,' who sought to expunge all Jewish elements from the Christian church. In a process that became more daring as Nazi plans for genocide unfolded, this group of Protestant lay people and clergy rejected the Old Testament, ousted people defined as non-Aryans from their congregations, denied the Jewish ancestry of Jesus, and removed Hebrew words like 'Hallelujah' from hymns. Bergen refutes the notion that the German Christians were a marginal group and demonstrates that members occupied key positions within the Protestant church even after their agenda was rejected by the Nazi leadership. Extending her analysis into the postwar period, Bergen shows how the German Christians were relatively easily reincorporated into mainstream church life after 1945. Throughout Twisted Cross, Bergen reveals the important role played by women and by the ideology of spiritual motherhood amid the German Christians' glorification of a 'manly' church.

Alsalar
Excellent book. The German Christian movement parallels the postmodern church of our present day. Many of the quotes from German Christian pastors resemble what we are hearing from the Emerging Church today. I especially appreciated the chapter on anti-doctrine. This book is thoroughly researched and worth the read.
Unsoo
Doris Bergen is a historian par excellence of this era and the dynamics one needs to understand. Great reading!
Amis
The Twisted Cross corrects the misunderstanding that the German Church was Hitler's theological partner and the Confessing Church the great opponent of Nazi ideology. Doris Bergen's research portrays the church scene under Hitler as complicated and often confused. The Nazi's were very uncomfortable with the German Church and often severely curtailed its work. The Confessing Church often found itself in agreement with the German Church and joined it in some projects. While Bonhoeffer and Barth are usually presented as the true representatives of the Confessing Church's attitude to Nazi ideology, Doris Bergen makes it clear that they were the exceptions rather than the norm.
sobolica
Repetitious, but good. I find that the book could have been about a third shorter and it would have been as good. But that is a minor quibble. I found it interesting that involvement in the German Christian Movement was minimized after the war, and that the Movement was tolerated as an odious necessity by the National Socialists. As covering an overlooked area of history, this book is helpful.
Laizel
Dit boek heb ik nog niet gelezen, daar ik vele boeken bezit over allerlei onderwerpen. Wel heb ik het boek ingezien.De Protestantse Kerk in het
Duitse Reich wou absoluut de Joodse invloed of kennis uit het Oude Testament verwijderen en Jezus Christus absoluut niet zien als een Jood,
maar wel als een Arier. Interessant boek.Een aan te raden boek, historisch en theologisch.
Cargahibe
Great book covering the German Christian movement and its corrupt nationalism and complicity and support of the Nazi regime.
Katius
Excellent book
The two previous reviews may be well-intended, but are not quite accurate from what I read in the book. The book is an excellent indictment of Christian anti-semitism fully realized on a national level, revealing the inherent hatred of Jews so easily supported by the Christian Bible. I highly recommend this book to every Christian as a tool for some soul-searching concerning the true nature of their faith.

The German Christians were not a sect. They were not a separate entity from Christian churches in Germany. It was a movement *within* typical German churches with large numbers of supporters and great influence on all Protestant Christians in Germany.

In Germany at the time, and "In July 1933 Protestant church elections across Germany filled a range of positions from parish representatives to senior consistory councillors. Representatives of the German Christian movement won two thirds of the votes cast. Hitler himself had urged election of German Christians, who, he claimed in a radio address, represented the "new" in the church. Affirmed by the biggest voter turnout ever in a Protestant church election and soon ensconced in the bishops' seats of all but three of Germany's Protestant regional churches, in 1933 the movement seemed unstoppable." (pg. 7)

Protestant refers to Lutheran, Reformed,and united churches in the category of Evangelical churches (not quite the same as used here in the US today).(pg. 5) SO the German Christians were not a relative few, a sect, a cult, or the "not true" Christians but instead a vast number of the Christian population---all devoted to the elimination of Jews from culture, from the nation, and physically from the land of the living. How proud their Aryan Jesus (descended from Viking tribes in Galilee!!!) must be of Christianity in Germany!

This book documents the driving Christian force in Christian churches of Nazi Germany, and exposes the complicity of Christianity in the Holocaust. The everyday Germans did not sanctimoniously sit in the pews unaware of what was going on in the streets, ghettoes and camps. Jew hatred was a national endeavor taught from the pulpits, the teacher's lectern, and recited by the children of that Christian nation. Christians made up the armies, execution squads, and camp staffs who murdered men, women, children, and infants for their Nazi Christ and fatherland.

This book also reveals some of the religio-social mechanics that allow such failures in humanity. It can happen here.

Jesus taught repentence. Admission of guilt precedes correction and rejection of sin and evil. Christian? Read this book and start the process.