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by Gerald Astor
Download Right to Fight: A History of African Americans in the Military fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Gerald Astor
  • ISBN:
    0756761735
  • ISBN13:
    978-0756761738
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Diane Pub Co (November 1, 1998)
  • Pages:
    529 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1420 kb
  • ePUB format
    1443 kb
  • DJVU format
    1316 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    426
  • Formats:
    rtf txt azw lrf


Gerald Astor is a prominent military historian and author whose previous books include A Blood-Dimmed Tide .

Gerald Astor is a prominent military historian and author whose previous books include A Blood-Dimmed Tide, The Greatest War, and The Mighty Eighth. He lives near New York City.

The Right to Fight book. Although African Americans have always fought and died in defense of their country, even before there was a United States of America, it has always been an uphill struggle for them to partake of this fundamental obligation of citizenship. Despite hundreds of years of evidence to the contrary.

He collaborated with Anthony Villano, a former . agent who recruited informants from the Mafia, in Brick Agent. In addition to his son, of Ardsley, .

From the birth of the United States, African American men and women have fought and died in defense of a nation that has often denied them many fundamental rights of citizenship. Now Gerald Astor has chronicled their efforts and accomplishments in this critically acclaimed survey.

An all-encompassing chronicle of African-Americans' struggles to serve in the armed forces of the US, by. .Astor's work is aptly titled, considering, as it does, the struggle that African-Americans have had to wage to fight for a society that mistrusted their courage under fire.

An all-encompassing chronicle of African-Americans' struggles to serve in the armed forces of the US, by popular military historian Astor (The Mighty Eighth, 1997, etc).

The Right to Fight is an overview of two centuries of African American military history and is the first to bring the information together into one book. The book also corrects errors of fact and interpretation in earlier histories of narrower scope

The Right to Fight is an overview of two centuries of African American military history and is the first to bring the information together into one book. The book also corrects errors of fact and interpretation in earlier histories of narrower scope. It incorporates memoirs, oral histories and interviews, including 60 the author conducted specifically for the book.

A large contingent of African Americans served in the American Civil War. 186,097 black men joined the Union Army: 7,122 officers, and 178,975 enlisted soldiers. 12 Approximately 20,000 black sailors served in the Union Navy and formed a large percentage of many ships' crews. Later in the War, many regiments were recruited and organized as the United States Colored Troops, which reinforced the Northern side substantially in the last two years.

As quoted in The Right to Fight: A History of African Americans in The Military (1998), by Gerald Astor, De Capo Press, pp. 440–443. php?title Daniel James Jr.

The campaign for African American rights-usually referred to as the civil . The fighting that took place was mainly between African American youths and the police.

The campaign for African American rights-usually referred to as the civil rights movement or the freedom movement-went forward in the 1940s and ’50s in persistent and deliberate steps. In the courts the NAACP successfully attacked restrictive covenants in housing, segregation in interstate transportation, and discrimination in public recreational facilities.

Military history of African Americans.

Describes the role of African Americans in the military from the Boston Massacre to the present day.

Chuynopana
This is another book that I bought for a gift for a friend. However, after receiving it, I looked thorugh it before wrapping it and decided that I will be ordering another one--this time for my own library.

I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who is nterested in Black History, or Military History. This is a subject that has only been one of study in the last 25-30 years, and is fascinating if one is totally unaware of this aspect of the Civil Rights movement, or Military history.
Westened
Great book
DABY
This book was needed for a class. I have found it to be a great dipiction of African American history. If you need a great source for research, this would be it.
Adaly
This is a readable and graphic history, mostly from the vantage point of the common soldier. Politics in the larger sense are frequently neglected. A glaring example of this neglect is the brief and flippant coverage of President Harry Truman's actual order to desegregate the US Armed Forces, the Executive Order 9981, issued in July of 1948. This seems to me to have been the single most important event in the entire saga, yet the author dismisses Truman in three pages, mostly quoting old letters which demonstrate, surprise! that GiveEmHell Harry used coarse language (in private) when talking about racial demographics, as he did when talking about everything else (in private). Readers who are looking for an account of what led up to this decision, which Truman knew could lose the Deep South in the tight upcoming election * will need to look elsewhere. The book "Foxholes and color lines : desegregrating the U.S. Armed Forces", by Sherie Mershon and Steven Schlossman (John Hopkins, 1998) has an entire chapter on this decision which so infuriated the white South and proved to be so important in the Civil Rights era.
Another deficiency, unfortunately not unusual these days, is the complete lack of notes. There is a bibliography, but who knows where a particular fact may have come from?
A good resource, but far from comprehensive.

* he did lose the Deep South; four states to a fellow who, though he was sworn to uphold the rule of law, was known to invite adversaries in public debate out onto the street to settle their differences, and, though not officially taking an oath to do so, loudly proclaimed that he would fight with all his might against "mixing", as it was then called, forbidden interaction that could ultimately lead to miscegenation. As it happened, the wowser who gained South Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi (plus an anomalous single Electoral Vote in Tennessee) but, to history's gratitude, lost the United States, had himself been guilty of miscegenation. With progeny to prove it.
Alister
The author, Astor has done a great job! This is such an overlooked area, the African American in the military, and Lord knows there were and are plenty! They are so 'pushed under the rug', much as an earlier reviewer claims that Truman was in this book. Truman received ample coverage because the book wasn't meant to spotlight Truman; it was intended to focus on African Americans in the military, like my Dad, who was a proud WWII veteran, and my Mom, also a WWII veteran who served in the U.S. Army Womens Army Corp; now that's a story, African American women in the military. I think the gentleman's name, who is working on a film about this is Gregory S Cooke; his work was featured in Jet magazine, and he can really use some funding for this all-important venture. Anyway, great job, Mr. Astor!
Eta
The subject that Gerald Astor has chosen to write about, depicts the continuing saga of a group of people that has been the subject of more studies then any other group in America. In a methodical and comprehensive manner the author gives us a chronological history of Black American and historic accomplishments of the black soldier. From the American Revolution to the Persian Gulf Astor paints a picture through interview and analysis that cuts away the bias that has been the hall mark of the manner that this subject has heretofore been treated. His anecdotal passages add a sense of the social and cultural times that are germain to the periods of history he writes about. The story of the first American Hero, Sgt Henry Johnson of Albany NY in WWI and the Montford Point Marines in WWII are of exceptional importance in this work. All to often these men and their significant contribution that helps to keep the fabric of America strong are grossly overlooked! This book is a must for African American HIstory, Military History and American History buff's in general.
Cogelv
The book seems thorough and incredibly detailed but it was dry and not very engaging. Also, while clearly Astor has done lots of research, there are no footnotes or indications of where the research in a given chapter comes from (although there is a bibliography at the end). The book follows the individual stories of lots of soldiers across the centuries, but instead of drawing me in, it just felt scattered.

Given the current election results, it is pretty amazing to find out that it wasn't really until the 1970's that the military made a concentrated effort to integrate systematically across all the forces. And to hear of the kind of discrimination still rampant in the Vietnam and Korean war is a reminder of how ground breaking Obama's win is.
I have been looking for a book that discusses more the tension for the African American soldier historically given his place in a predominantly racist America and fighting for that country. Buffalo soldiers even as fiction doesn't do a very good job of this.