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by Robert David Johnson
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Robert David Johnson
  • ISBN:
    0521425956
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521425957
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (February 23, 2009)
  • Pages:
    324 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1276 kb
  • ePUB format
    1677 kb
  • DJVU format
    1863 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    890
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Edward Berkowitz, George Washington University. This delightful book is well-written, well-argued, and beautifully balanced, telling a compelling story with broader resonance.

Johnson countered with what he called a "frontlash" strategy, appealing to moderate and liberal GOP suburbanites, but . excellent and (largely) balanced overview of the 1964 reelection campaign of LBJ. recommended for political scientists and historians interested in this key election.

Johnson countered with what he called a "frontlash" strategy, appealing to moderate and liberal GOP suburbanites, but he failed to create a new, permanent Democratic majority for the post-civil rights era. The work's themes - the impact of race on the political process, the question of politicians' personal and political ethics, and the tensions between politics and public policy - continue to resonate. Apr 23, 2009 Vanessa rated it it was amazing.

Incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson won the state of Arkansas with 5. 6 percent of the popular vote, which was a substantial . Johnson, Robert David; All the Way with LBJ: The 1964 Presidential Election, p. 225. ISBN 0521737524

Incumbent President Lyndon B. 6 percent of the popular vote, which was a substantial increase upon John F. Kennedy's 5. 9 percent from the preceding election, although the Republican vote remained virtually unchanged at 4. 1 percent. Johnson won all but ten of Arkansas' seventy-five counties, and all four congressional districts. ISBN 0521737524. Bass, Jack and De Vries, Walter; The Transformation of Southern Politics Social Change and Political Consequence Since 1945, p. 93. ISBN 0820317284.

by Robert David Johnson. All the Way with LBJ mines an extraordinarily rich but underutilized source - the full range of LBJ tapes - to analyze the 1964 presidential campaign and the political culture of the mid-1960s.

the 1964 presidential election. by Robert David Johnson. 1964, 20th century, 1963-1969. Establishing an image. The rise and fall of Henry Cabot Lodge. The politics of backlash. The Atlantic City convention.

Johnson easily won the 1964 presidential election, garnering more than . The book concludes with a promising agenda for the future of election reform and the political considerations that will be brought to bear on that agenda.

Johnson easily won the 1964 presidential election, garnering more than 61 percent of the popular vote and 94 percent of the black vote. The election also saw more blacks winning political office than in any year since the Reconstruction. This chapter focuses on Johnson’s support for the civil rights movement during his term as president of the United States, including his signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

The 1964 United States presidential election was the 45th quadrennial American presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 3, 1964. Incumbent Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson defeated Barry Goldwater, the Republican nominee

The 1964 United States presidential election was the 45th quadrennial American presidential election. Johnson defeated Barry Goldwater, the Republican nominee.

President Lyndon Baines Johnson (c. 1965) (Keystone/Getty Images). All the Way With LBJ. Arthur Herman. Democrats like to think of themselves as the party of Franklin Roosevelt. In fact, they are the party of Lyndon Johnson. For such reasons, Lyndon Johnson’s presidency deserves careful scrutiny, and two books, one new and one newly reissued, attempt to provide it. Both offer insights, but neither can fully rehabilitate Johnson, despite the authors’ admiration for their subject. In the end, LBJ is still one of the great wreckers in American history. Eugene McCarthy said that he knew of no one who worked for Johnson who was not diminished by him.

The LBJ Tapes: 1964 Presidential Election. jpgPresident Lyndon Johnson talked with staff and advisors about the Democratic National Convention, the upcoming election, Medicare and other legislation and civil unrest. President Lyndon Johnson talked with staff and advisors about the Democratic National Convention, the upcoming election, Medicare and other legislation and civil unrest.

All the Way with LBJ mines an extraordinarily rich but underutilized source - the full range of LBJ tapes - to analyze the 1964 presidential campaign and the political culture of the mid-1960s. The president achieved a smashing victory over a divided Republican Party, which initially considered Henry Cabot Lodge II, then U.S. ambassador to South Vietnam, before nominating Barry Goldwater, who used many of the themes that later worked for Republicans - a Southern strategy, portraying the Democrats as soft on defense, raising issues such as crime and personal ethics. Johnson countered with what he called a "frontlash" strategy, appealing to moderate and liberal GOP suburbanites, but he failed to create a new, permanent Democratic majority for the post-civil rights era. The work's themes - the impact of race on the political process, the question of politicians' personal and political ethics, and the tensions between politics and public policy - continue to resonate.

Drelalak
Well written. The book takes you back in time when all of this was actually happening and it seems like yesterday. Very accurate and entertaining.
Daiktilar
It is remarkable when reading a book like this to see just how much things have changed in the past 50 years, both in terms of what was tolerated and what was not. It was the year that the Republican Party turned its back on the legacy of its great presidents, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower and in favor of the Southern Strategy that involved alliances with the likes of Strom Thurmond and George Wallace (who tried to get Barry Goldwater to pick him as a running mate in this election). The Democrats won one of the great electoral victories of modern times which led to a partial realignment of both parties with the Democrats picking up the African American vote bloc and the Republicans picking up the anti-African American white southern vote as is the case today. It remains to be seen which party will regret this alignment. The Republicans gained a bloc which it needed to little more than scare in the subsequent 29th century elections, but hangs like a millstone in the 21st century, leading to the Democrats being poised to return as the dominant party in the 21st century.

Robert Johnson's history details that the incredible popular vote that LBJ wracked up did not have to end in the way that it did. For one, with a different candidate, instead of Barry Goldwater, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr for instance, the Republicans might have won and sent a pro-Civil Rights, pro-urban development, pro-engagement in Vietnam REPUBLICAN to the White House. What direction this may have sent the Republican Party boggles the mind. It might have made it difficult for Ronald Reagan to be elected not only governor, but president. Nixon could have been consigned to the political graveyard (and Nixon knew it, he pulled out the stops in 1964 to prevent Lodge's nomination as this book demonstrates). The Bushes would not have had to pretend to be populists and might have proven to be more of a credit to the office they were elected to.

Johnson became not only the winner in this contest, but the landslide victor by delft management of a series of what could have been fatal challenges to his re-election. The first was Bobby Baker, one of the best story tellers of what really happened in the senate from the 1950s-1960s. He was involved involved in a number of questionable financial practices that involved both sides of the political aisle and he also got senator feminine company when they needed it. It was this bi-partisan spirit that enabled Johnson to manage the senate inquiry into Baker's actions. Johnson was not the only political figure who relied on Bobby Baker's help. Johnson made sure that these senators knew what other secrets might come out if the Baker matter was pursued.

Next there was the matter of Vietnam, an area where Cabot Lodge enjoyed particular advantage over Johnson, serving as he was as the ambassador of Vietnam. While Lodge came in for his share of blame for the declining situation in Southeast Asia, he was, to be fair, the ambassador, not the pro-consel. The Gulf of Tonkin incident played into Johnson's hands and allowed him to depoliticize the political aspect of the war, though this would have consequences after 1964.

The Walter Jenkins affair probably represented, to people living in the 21st century, the oddest challenge. Jenkins was probably the person who knew more about the 1964 campaign and Johnson's priorities. However two weeks before the election, he was caught in homosexual trysting place and arrested. To say that Johnson over-reacted was to put it mildly. In order to defuse the matter he contemplated setting up something like a Warren Commission on his aide's homosexuality. The FBI was brought in, safes were opened and the contents were removed. LBJ even consulted J. Edger Hoover for advice on ways in which he could spot homosexuals. In the end, the Jenkins matter was buried by the removal of Nikita Khrushchev and China's first nuclear test. Yes, the idea that the president having a gay assistant was so bizarre that it took two revolutionary events around the world to take it off the front pages. The Republicans fearing defeat and seeking to exploit the Jenkins issue, ran true to form. As in the past they created a club (not unlike the Liberty League, America First, the Moral Majority or the Tea Party) to exploit the issue of "America's moral rot (aka, the Sexual Revolution) called Mothers for a Moral America. However, nuclear explosions and uncertain foreign developments made these efforts hollow indeed.

In the end, Southern fears of racial equality led to a realignment of politics as the South left the Democratic Party for at least the next 100 years, a move that continues to produce consequences both for the nation and the Republican party. Johnson's account is likely to be the definitive account of the election until Robert Caro completes his narrative of Johnson's life.