» » Japan Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process (Hoover Institution Press Publication)

Download Japan Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process (Hoover Institution Press Publication) fb2

by Leon Hollerman
Download Japan Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process (Hoover Institution Press Publication) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Leon Hollerman
  • ISBN:
    0817986324
  • ISBN13:
    978-0817986322
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hoover Institution Press; 1st edition (January 1, 1988)
  • Pages:
    185 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1516 kb
  • ePUB format
    1395 kb
  • DJVU format
    1681 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    430
  • Formats:
    mbr txt docx lrf


We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Japan Disincorporated book . Start by marking Japan Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The first, which Leon Hollerman refers to as "Japan, Incorporated," focuses on Japan as a small nation following World War II. In this phase Japan practiced protectionism without censure or retaliation from the world community. Professor Hollerman describes the alliance between government and bus.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 23 March 2011. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal.

Japan, Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process. Japan, Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process. The liberalization of the Japanese economy, domestically and internationally, has presented "a spectacle of interministerial rivalry, bureaucratic infighting, and conflict between government and business that normally would be papered over and concealed from public view.

Japan Disincorporated : The Economic Liberalization Process. Publisher:Hoover Institution Press.

book by Leon Hollerman. Japan Disincorporated : The Economic Liberalization Process.

via Hoover Institution Press.

Articles Books Videos Podcasts Working Papers Essays Speeches & Testimony News/Press Events Polls. The Effect of Japanese Investment on the World Economy. via Hoover Institution Press. Thursday, April 4, 1996. A study of the controversy over Japanese foreign investments.

Lynn, Leonard . 1988. Japan, disincorporated: The economic liberalization process : Leon Hollerman, Stanford, California: Hoover Institution Press. Handle: RePEc:eee:bushor:v:31:y:1988:i:5:p:85-86. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Japan Economic Foundation, Retrieved on January 20, 2014. Japan, Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process (Issue 363 of Publication Series). Hoover Press, January 1, 1988. 11th Floor, Jiji Press Bldg 5-15-8 Ginza Chuo-ku,Tokyo 104-0061, Japan" - Japanese address (Archive): "〒104-0061 東京都中央区銀座5-15-8 時事通信ビル11F". "Journal of Japanese Trade & Industry" (). Japan Economic Foundation. ISBN 0817986332, 9780817986339.

Japan, disincorporated: The economic liberalization process : Leon Hollerman, Stanford, California: Hoover Institution Press. Washington: Brookings Institution Press, 1998.

Japan, Disincorporated: The Economic Liberalization Process (Issue 363 of Publication Series). The first of these was the Kokusai Keizai Kōryu Zaidan (Japan Economic Foundation); the second was Bōeki Sangyō Kyōryoku Zaidan (Japan Trade and Industry Cooperation Foundation).

Three phases of Japans postwar transition from the framework of this study. The first, which Leon Hollerman refers to as "Japan, Incorporated," focuses on Japan as a small nation following World War II. In this phase Japan practiced protectionism without censure or retaliation from the world community. Professor Hollerman describes the alliance between government and business for the promotion of mutual interests and the national interests of Japan. In the second phase, or "Japan, Disincorporated," Hollerman addresses Japans emergence as a major industrial nation in which economic liberalization was formally espoused. During this period the interests of business (especially big business) and the interests of government temporarily diverged. The third phase has not yet begun; Professor Hollerman analyzes a possible scenario following the 1980s and calls it "Japan, Reincorporated." In that scenario, government and business reach an accord by which the interests of the nation, of the bureaucracy, and of big business converge. This book focuses on the second phase, particularly on the years from 1980 to 1984, when bureaucratic infighting, interministerial rivalry, and conflict between government and business in Japan surged into view. Professor Hollermans lucid explanations of Japanese economic and national strategy make this volume essential reading for anyone interested in Japans challenge to U.S. bankers, investors, and leaders of transnational corporations.