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by Lisa I. Knight
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Lisa I. Knight
  • ISBN:
    0199773548
  • ISBN13:
    978-0199773541
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; 1 edition (June 6, 2011)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
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    1439 kb
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    1161 kb
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    1826 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
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Contradictory Lives: Baul. has been added to your Cart. The dominant tropes imagined for the Baul tradition of eastern India and Bangladesh are constructed around male models: the wandering mistrel carrying his ektara instrument who engages in esoteric ritual practices.

Contradictory Lives: Baul. Lisa Knight's sensitive ethnography, however, fills in the significant lacunae of the lives and practices of Baul women. She artfully analyzes the ways in which these women bridge the contradictory expectations of Baul traditions as 'wanderers' and those of the non-Baul communities as respectable, settled Bengali householders.

In literature and popular imagination, the Bauls of India and Bangladesh are characterized as musical mystics: orange-clad nomads of both Hindu and Muslim backgrounds. They wander the countryside and entertain with their passionate singing and unusual behavior, and they are especially well-known for their evocative songs, which challenge the caste system and sectarianism prevalent in South Asia. Although Bauls claim to value women over men, little is known about the individual views and experiences of Baul women.

Contradictory Lives book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Contradictory Lives: Baul Women in India and Bangladesh as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Lisa Knight examines the contradictory expectations regarding Baul women: on the one hand, the ideal .

Lisa Knight examines the contradictory expectations regarding Baul women: on the one hand, the ideal of a group unencumbered by societal restraints and concerns and, on the other, the real constraints of feminine respectability that seemingly curtail women's mobility and public performances. Knight demonstrates that Baul women respond to these conflicting expectations in various ways, sometimes adopting and other times subverting local gendered norms to craft meaningful lives.

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In literature and popular imagination, the Bauls of India and Bangladesh are characterized as musical mystics: orange-clad mads of both Hindu and Muslim backgrounds who wander the countryside and entertain with their passionate singing and unusual behavior. Although Bauls claim to value women over men, little is kwn about the individual views and experiences of Baul women.

This book shows how Baul women interpret and respond to these various constructions of gender and Baul .

It argues that Baul women negotiate their identity, position, and life choices in light of contradictory expectations of appropriate behavior for Bengali women and for Bauls. It demonstrates that Baul women draw on the very tools of their encumbering to create for themselves a meaningful life and a more just society. As they sing, wander, take renunciation, and raise a family, they expand ideas about both women and Bauls in Bengal.

Ascetic Bauls renounce family life and society and survive on alms. They have no fixed dwelling place, but move from one akhda to another. Knight, Lisa I. (2011). Contradictory Lives: Baul Women in India and Bangladesh. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-977354-1. Men wear white lungis and long, white tunics; women wear white saris. They carry jholas, shoulder bags for alms. They do not beget or rear children. They are treated as jyante mara or dalits. Women dedicated to the service of ascetics, are known as sevadasis "service slaves". A male Baul can have one or more sevadasis, who are associated with him in the act of devotion.

Home Books Miscellaneous Books Contradictory Lives Baul Women in India and Bangladesh. Additional Product Information Composer/Author: Knight, Lisa I. Format: Hardback. Contradictory Lives Baul Women in India and Bangladesh. Additional Product Information. Composer/Author: Knight, Lisa I.

In literature and popular imagination, the Bauls of India and Bangladesh are characterized as musical mystics: orange-clad nomads of both Hindu and Muslim backgrounds.

Contradictory Lives: Baul Women in India and Bangladesh by Lisa I. Knight. This chapter describes three efforts to change these statistics: the work of Hindustan Lever in India to provide affordable products and jobs to the poorest villages, the. January 2012 · The Journal of Asian Studies. Antoinette E. DeNapoli. well-known work of Mohammed Yunus in Bangladesh to take over six million families there out of-poverty, and E-Choupal, an ongoing effort to improve communication facilities between farmers in remote villages, allowing them to sell their products where they are needed rather than creating surpluses or shortages in various area.

In literature and popular imagination, the Bauls of India and Bangladesh are characterized as musical mystics: orange-clad nomads of both Hindu and Muslim backgrounds. They wander the countryside and entertain with their passionate singing and unusual behavior, and they are especially well-known for their evocative songs, which challenge the caste system and sectarianism prevalent in South Asia. Although Bauls claim to value women over men, little is known about the individual views and experiences of Baul women. Based on ethnographic research in both the predominantly Hindu context of West Bengal (India) and the Muslim country of Bangladesh, this book explores the everyday lives of Baul women. Lisa Knight examines the contradictory expectations regarding Baul women: on the one hand, the ideal of a group unencumbered by societal restraints and concerns and, on the other, the real constraints of feminine respectability that seemingly curtail women's mobility and public performances. Knight demonstrates that Baul women respond to these conflicting expectations in various ways, sometimes adopting and other times subverting local gendered norms to craft meaningful lives. More so than their male counterparts, Baul women feel encumbered by norms. But rather than seeing Baul women's normative behavior as indicative of their conformity to gendered roles (and, therefore, failures as Bauls), Knight argues that these women creatively draw on societal expectations to transcend their social limits and create new paths.