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by Christine Ryan
Download The Children of War: Child Soldiers as Victims and Participants in the Sudan Civil War (International Library of African Studies) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Christine Ryan
  • ISBN:
    1780760175
  • ISBN13:
    978-1780760179
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    I.B.Tauris (June 15, 2012)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1111 kb
  • ePUB format
    1733 kb
  • DJVU format
    1655 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    978
  • Formats:
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The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies

The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies. Thousands of children signed up to participate in Africa's longest running civil war, yet so far the international community and the academic world have viewed them as victims rather than participants. In this groundbreaking new study, Christine Emily Ryan challenges preconceptions which have held back aid work and reconstruction in the Sudan region.

The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies

The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies. In this groundbreaking new study, Christine Emily Ryan challenges preconceptions which have held back aid work and reconstruction in the Sudan region

The Children of War book. In this groundbreaking new study, Christine Emily Ryan The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies.

The Children of War book.

The Journal of Modern African Studies. Children of War: Child Soldiers as Victims and Participants in the Sudan Civil War by C. Ryan London: . Pp. 320. £5. 0 (hbk).

the international community and the academic world have viewed them as victims rather than participants.

THE CHILDREN OF WAR The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies.

Deepening readers' knowledge of armed conflict in Africa is a common purpose of the books discussed in this essay.

The Children of War: Child Soldiers as Victims and Participants in the Sudan Civil War. New York: I. B. Tauris & Co. Ltd, 2012. viii + 320 pp. Figures. Deepening readers' knowledge of armed conflict in Africa is a common purpose of the books discussed in this essay. Each author advances beyond the established explanations of the conflicts and combatants' involvement in these conflicts. All provide the political, economic, and cultural-historical and contemporary context that allows readers to understand better these armed conflicts and the affected populations.

Child Soldiers in Africa refers to the military use of children under the age of 18 by national armed forces or other armed groups in Africa. Typically, this classification includes children serving in non-combatant roles (such as cooks or messengers), as well as those serving in combatant roles. In 2008, it was estimated that 40 percent of child soldiers worldwide were in Africa, and that the use of child soldiers in armed conflict was increasing faster than any other continent.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies. In this groundbreaking new study, Christine EmilyRyan challenges preconceptions which have held back aid work and reconstruction in the Sudan region.

Children have served as soldiers throughout history. Pair this book with Healing The Children of War (Phyllis Kilbourn), you will have two great books dealing with the issue of child soldiers. They fought in the American Revolution, the Civil War, and in both world wars. They served as uniformed soldiers, camouflaged insurgents, and even suicide bombers. Does this mean that child soldiers are aggressors? Or are they victims? It is a difficult question with no obvious answer, yet in recent years the acceptable answer among humanitarian organizations and contemporary scholars has been resoundingly the latter.

More than 300 former child soldiers in South Sudan have been returned to regular society after spending time in a UN. .

More than 300 former child soldiers in South Sudan have been returned to regular society after spending time in a UN rehabilitation program meant to help children who were conscripted into militant groups to reintegrate. The children were rescued from the Yambio region, the epicenter of fighting in the South Sudanese Civil War that has raged since late 2013, leading to tens of thousands of casualties and over . million people displaced. The UNMISS maintains a peacekeeping force in the country to protect civilians and since 2016 has partnered with United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) to help bring children out of the conflict.

The use of child soldiers in the Sudan Civil War has shattered the accepted understanding of why children join armies. Thousands of children signed up to participate in Africa's longest running civil war, yet so far the international community and the academic world have viewed them as victims rather than participants. In this groundbreaking new study, Christine Emily Ryan challenges preconceptions which have held back aid work and reconstruction in the Sudan region. Using face-to-face testimonies of former child soldiers, she illuminates the multi-dimensional motivations which children have for joining the Sudan Liberation Army, and unravels the complexity of their political participation. At the same time, interviews with NGO personnel illustrate the gap that exists between the West and the reality of conflict in Africa. Children of War provides a powerful critique of the position taken by the international community, NGOs and academia to the phenomenon of child soldiers, and calls for a new approach to conflict resolution in Africa.