» » The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution, and the Collapse of the Soviet Union

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by Ronald Grigor Suny
Download The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution, and the Collapse of the Soviet Union fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Ronald Grigor Suny
  • ISBN:
    0804721343
  • ISBN13:
    978-0804721349
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stanford University Press; 1 edition (December 1, 1993)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1400 kb
  • ePUB format
    1339 kb
  • DJVU format
    1246 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    221
  • Formats:
    rtf azw docx lrf


A lot of good historical effort went into the writting of this book. Suny stresses the development and creation of nationalism within the Soviet Union as the main cause of its collapse.

A lot of good historical effort went into the writting of this book. Being written in 1993, there was not really enough time to let things soak in after the fall of the Soviet Union. The perspective and hindsight just isn't there. Also, too focused on the Causacus region. This nationalism, he states, is built on common interests, imagined communities (loaned from Benedict Anderson), rituals, symbols, flags, songs, collective events and the expression of goals. Suny describes how, especially under Lenin, the development of nationalism was encouraged the Soviet Union.

The book has a dual purpose "Here is the book of choice if one wants a succinct treatment of nationalism past and present in the former Soviet Union. More in History-European.

The book has a dual purpose. The first is to explore the formation of nations within the Soviet Union, the policies of the Soviet Union toward non-Russian peoples, and the ultimate contradictions between those policies and the development of nations. The second, more general, purpose is to show how nations have grown in the twentieth century. Here is the book of choice if one wants a succinct treatment of nationalism past and present in the former Soviet Union. The first is to explore the formation of nations within the Soviet Union, the policies of the Soviet Union toward non-Russian peoples, and the ultimate contradictions between those policies and the development of nations

The book has a dual purpose. The principle of nationality that buried the Soviet Union and destroyed its empire in Eastern Europe continues to shape and reshape the configuration of states and political movements among the new independent countries of the vast East European-Eurasian.

Ronald Suny’s basic argument in The Revenge of the Past is that, at the same time that it attempted to build a unified nation that superseded individual nationalisms, the Soviet central government actually engendered the creation of nationalistic sentiments and attachments. These forces grew stronger as time progressed and, during the critical period of Gorbachev’s perestroika and glasnost, were unleashed against the government and ended up overwhelming it, thus causing its downfall.

Suny also contributes war with the strengthening of the nation.

book by Ronald Grigor Suny. This timely work shows how and why the dramatic collapse of the Soviet Union was caused in large part by nationalism. Suny also contributes war with the strengthening of the nation. In the book he describes clearly the reasons to why regions in the Soviet Union became independent nations and why this process occured on different terms in these different areas.

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Stuart Kaufman University of Kentucky. Published September 9, 1994.

Ronald Grigor Suny, The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution, and the Collapse of the Soviet Union. Stuart Kaufman University of Kentucky. Ronald Grigor Suny, The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution, and the Collapse of the Soviet Union. Journal of Conflict Studies, 14(4).

3. StateBuilding and NationMaking: The Soviet Experience (page 84). Read. 4. Nationalism and NationStates: Gorbachev's Dilemmas (page 127).

This timely work shows how and why the dramatic collapse of the Soviet Union was caused in large part by nationalism. Unified in their hostility to the Kremlin's authority, the fifteen constituent Union Republics, including the Russian Republic, declared their sovereignty and began to build state institutions of their own. The book has a dual purpose. The first is to explore the formation of nations within the Soviet Union, the policies of the Soviet Union toward non-Russian peoples, and the ultimate contradictions between those policies and the development of nations. The second, more general, purpose is to show how nations have grown in the twentieth century. The principle of nationality that buried the Soviet Union and destroyed its empire in Eastern Europe continues to shape and reshape the configuration of states and political movements among the new independent countries of the vast East European-Eurasian region.

Coidor
The info is there, but the writing is kind of mediocre. A lot of good historical effort went into the writting of this book. Being written in 1993, there was not really enough time to let things soak in after the fall of the Soviet Union. The perspective and hindsight just isn't there. Also, too focused on the Causacus region. That would be fine if the book's thesis concentrated on that, but the thesis is so broad, and the coverage sonarrow, that the book doesn't really set out what it intended to do. The Baltic states and basically every other region with minority majorities are insufficiently analyzed. He also excludes certain nationalities while speaking of others almost at random. Why introduce the Finns in such detail if they do not play a role in the downfall of the USSR? Finally, it is overly wordy, with many sentances being run ons. It sometimes reads as if he replaced as many words as possible with longer ones from a thesaurus. Just some opinions. Overall, 3 stars because of excellent coverage of Caucasus region and painstaking historical details put into the work. 2 stars deducted for reasons listed.
Hinewen
good
Ranenast
I bought this book for my son's term paper and he found it chock full of information for his project. Plus it was a great read for the rest of the family.
Auridora
Suny stresses the development and creation of nationalism within the Soviet Union as the main cause of its collapse. This nationalism, he states, is built on common interests, imagined communities (loaned from Benedict Anderson), rituals, symbols, flags, songs, collective events and the expression of goals.
Suny describes how, especially under Lenin, the development of nationalism was encouraged the Soviet Union. It was this naïve trust in the institutionalization of previously non-existent nationalism within the Soviet Union which lead to inner conflict and desire for the new nations to break free from the Diets, from Russia's rule.
Suny points out that nationalism and nationality are not artificial by blending his moderately constructivst view on nationalism with the suggestion that nationalities might be rooted in "ethnies" (Anthony D. Smith's term). Suny also contributes war with the strengthening of the nation.
In the book he describes clearly the reasons to why regions in the Soviet Union became independent nations and why this process occured on different terms in these different areas. The nations he pedagogically discusses are Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Ukraine, Belarus, Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan.
In part the author contributes the short-sightedness of the Russian policy of building nations to the failure of Marxists in the 19th and early 20th century to realize the importance of nationalism.
Ethnicity and class were not obliterated in the Soviet Union and it remained an empire open mostly for Russians and Slavs. In Caucasus the local peoples were constantly kicked around by the Soviet Union and surrounding empires. In Azerbaijanis' capital, Baku, the Azerbaijan's were marginalized by the influx of skilled-workers (mostly from Northern lands).
Eventually due to Stalin's strangle-hold; the following "thaw" under Chruschev, Breshnev, Chernko; due to Gorbachev's bumbling and the intiative of Russian satellite states; the aforementioned nine nations broke free from the retarding Russian rule and became independent nations.
This book provides an interesting perspective on the development of nations and nationlism and their seeming inevitability in a world ruled by such things such as democracy, capitalism, class and race. Suny has written this book in an orderly fashion and covered in detail the specific nations and the struggles within. However, this book is lacking many details in the effort to depict the downfall of the Soviet Union from a somewhat tenuous perspective that favors political ideology and momentum of specific classes as the sole firebrands of revolution.