» » The Boundaries of the Republic: Migrant Rights and the Limits of Universalism in France, 1918-1940

Download The Boundaries of the Republic: Migrant Rights and the Limits of Universalism in France, 1918-1940 fb2

by Mary Dewhurst Lewis
Download The Boundaries of the Republic: Migrant Rights and the Limits of Universalism in France, 1918-1940 fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Mary Dewhurst Lewis
  • ISBN:
    0804755825
  • ISBN13:
    978-0804755825
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stanford University Press; 1 edition (June 7, 2007)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1824 kb
  • ePUB format
    1239 kb
  • DJVU format
    1434 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    437
  • Formats:
    lrf doc azw mobi


Mary Dewhurst Lewis's Boundaries of the Republic is a book with many virtues. After the devastation of the First World War, France welcomed immigrants on an unprecedented scale.

Mary Dewhurst Lewis's Boundaries of the Republic is a book with many virtues. It will surely be seen as a major contribution to the history of French immigration and therefore to the making of modern France. Gregory Mann Columbia University, French Politics, Culture and Society). To manage these new residents, the French government devised Europe’s first guestworker program, then encouraged family settlements and finally cracked down on all foreigners on the eve of the Second World War.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

Mary Dewhurst Lewis uncovers the French Republic's hidden history of inequality as she reconstructs the life . Mary Dewhurst Lewis's Boundaries of the Republic is a book with many virtues

Mary Dewhurst Lewis uncovers the French Republic's hidden history of inequality as she reconstructs the life stories of immigrants-from their extraordinary successes to their sometimes heartbreaking failures as they attempted to secure basic rights. Situating migrants' lives within dramatic reversals in the economy, politics, and international affairs, Lewis shows how factors large and small combined to shape immigrant rights. Mary Dewhurst Lewis's Boundaries of the Republic is a book with many virtues.

Mary Dewhurst Lewis uncovers the French Republic's hidden history of inequality as she reconstructs the life stories of. .

Mary Dewhurst Lewis uncovers the French Republic's hidden history of inequality as she reconstructs the life stories of immigrants-from their extraordinary successes to their sometimes heartbreaking failures as they attempted to secure basic rights. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

By Mary Dewhurst Lewis. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2007. Going for an Indian : South Asian Restaurants and the Limits of Multiculturalism in Britain. University of Michigan. Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921. Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe. Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965. An Identity of Opinion: Historians and July 1914. Williamson Jr. et al.

2- Lewis, Mary . Les frontières de la République. Immigration et limites de l’universalisme en France, 1918-1940,trad. par F. Jaouën, Marseille, Agone 2010. Recommend this journal.

Mary Dewhurst Lewis uncovers the French Republic's hidden history of inequality as she reconstructs the life stories of immigrants from their extraordinary successes to their sometimes heartbreaking failures as they attempted to secure basic rights.

Mary Dewhurst Lewis is Professor of History at Harvard and author of The Boundaries of the Republic: Migrant Rights and the Limits of Universalism in France, 1918-1940 (Stanford University Press, 2007). One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Despite France's famous doctrine of universal rights, these policies were egalitarian only in theory, not in reality.

After the devastation of the First World War, France welcomed immigrants on an unprecedented scale. To manage these new residents, the French government devised Europe's first guest worker program, then encouraged family settlements and finally cracked down on all foreigners on the eve of the Second World War. Despite France's famous doctrine of universal rights, these policies were egalitarian only in theory, not in reality.

Migrant Rights and the Limits of Universalism in France, 1918-1940. by Mary Dewhurst Lewis. Published June 11, 2007 by Stanford University Press. Alien labor, Emigration and immigration, Government policy, History, Immigrants.

After the devastation of the First World War, France welcomed immigrants on an unprecedented scale. To manage these new residents, the French government devised Europe's first guest worker program, then encouraged family settlements and finally cracked down on all foreigners on the eve of the Second World War. Despite France's famous doctrine of universal rights, these policies were egalitarian only in theory, not in reality. Mary Dewhurst Lewis uncovers the French Republic's hidden history of inequality as she reconstructs the life stories of immigrants―from their extraordinary successes to their sometimes heartbreaking failures as they attempted to secure basic rights. Situating migrants' lives within dramatic reversals in the economy, politics, and international affairs, Lewis shows how factors large and small combined to shape immigrant rights. At once an arresting account of European social and political unrest in the 1920s and 1930s and an exposé of the origins of France's enduring conflicts over immigration, The Boundaries of the Republic is an important reflection on both the power and the fragility of rights in democratic societies.