» » Absolutism in Renaissance Milan: Plenitude of Power under the Visconti and the Sforza 1329-1535

Download Absolutism in Renaissance Milan: Plenitude of Power under the Visconti and the Sforza 1329-1535 fb2

by Jane Black
Download Absolutism in Renaissance Milan: Plenitude of Power under the Visconti and the Sforza 1329-1535 fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Jane Black
  • ISBN:
    0199565295
  • ISBN13:
    978-0199565290
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 20, 2009)
  • Pages:
    300 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1424 kb
  • ePUB format
    1275 kb
  • DJVU format
    1353 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    769
  • Formats:
    lit docx azw mbr


Absolutism in Renaissance Milan shows how authority above the law, once the preserve of pope and emperor, was .

Absolutism in Renaissance Milan shows how authority above the law, once the preserve of pope and emperor, was claimed by the ruling Milanese dynasties, the Visconti and the Sforza, and why this privilege was finally abandoned by Francesco II Sforza (d. 1535), the last duke. As new rulers, the Visconti and the Sforza had had to impose their regime by rewarding supporters at the expense of opponents. That process required absolute power, also known as "plenitude of power," meaning the capacity to overrule even fundamental laws and rights, including titles to property. That process required absolute power, also known as 'plenitude of power', meaning the capacity to overrule even fundamental laws and rights, including titles to property.

Absolutism in Renaissance Milan book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Absolutism in Renaissance Milan shows how authority above. Start by marking Absolutism in Renaissance Milan: Plenitude of Power Under the Visconti and the Sforza 1329-1535 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

As new rulers, the Visconti and the Sforza had had to impose their regime by rewarding supporters at the .

As new rulers, the Visconti and the Sforza had had to impose their regime by rewarding supporters at the expense of opponents. That process required absolute power (also known as plenitude of power), meaning the capacity to laws and the rights of subjects, including titles to property. The basis for such power reflected the changing status of Milanese rulers, first as signori and then as dukes. Black traces the application of plenitude of power in daytoday government, and demonstrates how the rulers of Milan kept pace with the initial acceptance and subsequent rejection by lawyers of the concept of absolute power.

Absolutism in Renaissance Milan shows how authority above the law, once the preserve of pope and emperor .

Plenitude of Power under the Visconti and the Sforza 1329-1535. Absolutism in Renaissance Milan shows how authority above the law, once the preserve of pope and emperor, was claimed by the ruling Milanese dynasties, the Visconti and the Sforza, and why this privilege was finally abandoned by Francesco II Sforza (d.

Keywords: Renaissance Milan, Plenitude, Jane Black, Sforza, Visconti, Absolutism in Renaissance.

Rulers of Milan, 1287-1535 Plenitude of power : absolutism in the Middle Ages The early Visconti and the claim to. .Certa scientia, non obstante, motu proprio Appendix 2: Plenitude of power and iura reservata.

Rulers of Milan, 1287-1535 Plenitude of power : absolutism in the Middle Ages The early Visconti and the claim to plenitude of power Giangaleazzo's investiture and its legacy Lawyers and the absolute powers of the duke Plenitude of power in practice : preserving justice while infringing rights Lawyers and the repudiation of ducal absolutism The surrender of absolute power in Milan Appendix 1: Certa scientia, non obstante, motu proprio Appendix 2: Plenitude of power and iura reservata. Personal Name: Visconti family. Personal Name: Sforza family.

By Black, Jane independent scholar. Absolutism in Renaissance Milan. Black, Jane independent schola.

Chicago Distribution Center Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe.

Chicago Distribution Center. Mark Jurdjevic, "Jane Black, Absolutism in Renaissance Milan: Plenitude of Power under the Visconti and the Sforza, 1329–1535. " The Journal of Modern History 83, no. 4 (December 2011): 919-921. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Going for an Indian : South Asian Restaurants and the Limits of Multiculturalism in Britain. Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe. Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965.

Absolutism in Renaissance Milan shows how authority above the law, once the preserve of pope and emperor, was claimed by the ruling Milanese dynasties, the Visconti and the Sforza, and why this privilege was finally abandoned by Francesco II Sforza (d. 1535), the last duke. As new rulers, the Visconti and the Sforza had had to impose their regime by rewarding supporters at the expense of opponents. That process required absolute power, also known as "plenitude of power," meaning the capacity to overrule even fundamental laws and rights, including titles to property. The basis for such power reflected the changing status of Milanese rulers, first as signori and then as dukes. Contemporary lawyers, schooled in the sanctity of fundamental laws, were at first prepared to overturn established doctrines in support of the free use of absolute power: even the leading jurist of the day, Baldo degli Ubaldi (d. 1400), accepted the new teaching. However, lawyers came eventually to regret the new approach and to reassert the principle that laws could not be set aside without compelling justification. The Visconti and the Sforza too saw the dangers of absolute power: as legitimate princes they were meant to champion law and justice, not condone arbitrary acts that disregarded basic rights. Jane Black traces these developments in Milan over the course of two centuries, showing how the Visconti and Sforza regimes seized, exploited and finally relinquished absolute power.