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by Miranda Green
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Miranda Green
  • ISBN:
    0415146275
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415146272
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (May 10, 1996)
  • Pages:
    864 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1198 kb
  • ePUB format
    1812 kb
  • DJVU format
    1203 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    612
  • Formats:
    azw mbr lrf txt


It will be clear from the foregoing discussion that there are major problems in defining Celts and Celticness.

The Celtic World draws together material from all over pagan Celtic .

The Celtic World draws together material from all over pagan Celtic Europe and includes contributions from British, European and American scholars. She lectures on Early Celtic Studies and contributes to the third-year undergraduate Theory course. The book addresses some important issues - Who were the ancient Celts? Can we speak of them as the first Europeans? In what form does the Celtic identity exist today and how does this relate to the ancient Celts? For anyone interested in the Celts, and for students and academics alike, The Celtic World will be a valuable resource and a fascinating read.

The Celtic World by Miranda Green is very impressive indeed. There is a lot here that is new and the detail is the most impressive thing about it, but then there are contributors of the calibre of Dr. Anne Ross and Professor Proinsias Mac Cana, whose works already rank as standard texts. Giving unprecedented breadth and depth of coverage, they are the works against which all future books on their subjects will be judged and are essential reading for anyone with a serious interest in the subject. Learn mor. ubject Categories.

McCarthy, James and Hague, Euan 2004. Race, Nation, and Nature: The Cultural Politics of Celtic Identification in the American West. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Vol. 94, Issue. Google Scholar Citations. View all Google Scholar citations for this article.

The World of the Celts by Simon James; Pagan Celtic Ireland: The Enigma of the Irish Iron Age by Barry Raftery; Celtic Britain by Charles Thomas; Celtic Goddesses: Warriors, Virgins and Mothers by Miranda Green; The World of the Druids by Miranda J. Green; Celtic Sacred Landscapes. Green; Celtic Sacred Landscapes by Nigel Pennick", American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 102, No. 4 (Oc. 1998), pp. 814–816, JSTOR, where two of her books, both published in 1997, use different forms.

The Celtic World is a detailed and comprehensive study of the Celts from the first evidence of them in the archaeological and historical . New Statesman and Society. The Celtic World by Miranda Green is very impressive indeed.

The Celtic World is a detailed and comprehensive study of the Celts from the first evidence of them in the archaeological and historical record to the early post-Roman period. The Celtic World draws together material from all over pagan Celtic Europe and includes contributions from British, European and American scholars.

Miranda Aldhouse-Green. The new instalment in T&H's successful myths series (after The Greek and Roman Myths and The Egyptian Myths) introduces the world of the Celts, their gods and goddesses, heroes, monsters and villains. As well as vividly exploring the tales, the author brings her expertise in the archaeology of the Iron Age and particularly shamanism to bear on the mythical worlds she describes, with evidence as diverse as the Gundestrup Cauldron and the famous bog bodies. Flag as Inappropriate. An Archaeology of Images, Routledge, 2004. The Quest for the Shaman, Shape-Shifters, Sorcerers And Spirit Healers of Ancient Europe, Thames & Hudson, 2005 (with Stephen Aldhouse-Green). Boudicca Britannia, Pearson Longman, 2006.

The Celtic World is a detailed and comprehensive study of the Celts from the first evidence of them in the archaeological and historical record to the early post-Roman period. The strength of this volume lies in its breadth - it looks at archaeology, language, literature, towns, warfare, rural life, art, religion and myth, trade and industry, political organisations, society and technology. The Celtic World draws together material from all over pagan Celtic Europe and includes contributions from British, European and American scholars. Much of the material is new research which is previously unpublished.The book addresses some important issues - Who were the ancient Celts? Can we speak of them as the first Europeans? In what form does the Celtic identity exist today and how does this relate to the ancient Celts?For anyone interested in the Celts, and for students and academics alike, The Celtic World will be a valuable resource and a fascinating read.

you secret
This multi-hundred page collection of essays, penned by experts in the field, is not for the feint of heart. Gird on your academic power belt and cast your Resistance-to-Some Dry-Writing spell before opening. What I'm saying is that this is a serious book by serious and careful people. Great information in the experts' own voices--some voices impassioned and almost lyrical, some pedantic and droning. But all--well, almost all--dropping big intellectual bombs about an ancient people that most folks today think of as always living in Ireland--not crushing the ancient Macedonians and almost extinguishing the fledgling Roman State.

Great stuff.

The advantage of the essay format is that you can skip along like a flat stone and read what you want, ignore what you want. These folks ALL know what they are talking about. Just imagine yourself at a party at Havard or Cambridge. Some storytellers dazzle. Some just drone. They all have something to say.
Black_Hawk_Down.
This is an anthology of 41 essays concerning a wide number of topics concerning Celtic Studies, from the bronze age to Modern times. Religion, economy, boat-building, town structure, metalworking, art, and so forth are discussed in some depth. Celtic Christianity is further discussed as are the survival prospects for the current Celtic languages.

This is a mammoth tome-- the essays total over 800 pages of information, and while there is some variation in quality among the essays, this is to be expected.

More than this would not be possible in a book covering so much material. However, I will go into a little more detail on one specific topic that I found in this book: the implication of the arrival of the iron age. The typical historical narrative goes something like this: One day, our stone age ancestors discovered how to smelt copper. Eventually they learned how to mix it with other things to make harder alloys like arsenical and tin bronze. As they developed their technologies they learned how to smelt iron, and because iron is so much superior to bronze it quickly took over. There are some things that have bothered me for a long time about that theory, including the fact that we have small numbers of iron artifacts made by otherwise bronze-age cultures in the Pontic-Caspian Steppes (see The Horse, the Wheel, and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World for more on that topic).

This essay introduces a few ideas which I think are crucial to solving that problem. Instead of discussing progressions of smelting techologies, the author addresses the economic impact and required technological changes in switching from bronze to iron. The detailed discussions of bronze vs ironworking techniques plus the discussions of general availability of iron vs copper and tin allow me to understand this shift as primarily economic rather than technological in nature (technological changes were required but they were more lateral changes than upgrades per se).

Every other essay in this book is similarly fascinating and thought provoking. I would certainly recommend it to anyone who already has a grounding in this area and is looking for more advanced reading material.
FireWater
An excellent in-depth coverage of new analysis.
I could not put it down.
Winn
The gold standard of Celtic history.
MrDog
This book is great it spans a large number of related topics while managing to be clear and understandable to most all readers. If you're an archaeology student or just interested in Celtic Studies this is a great place to start serious research.
Yannara
I hate having good books arrive with corners crunched up due to poor packing.
The price was good, and it would have been a good value if it had been shipped in a box.
Gann
Four and a half stars.
A comprehensive work using some many recent archeological discoveries. It is a great work if somewhat pedantic and should have more footnotes than it does. Some readers may be annoyed too that some chapters use second hand sources. And like Kruta's book on the Celts some of the essays are somewhat uneven in their quality. Certain chapters focus too much on arcana while others are down right confusing. It is also uneven in presenting scant information on the Hallstatt period. It is not recommend for those studying Celtic art as it lacks any color photographs. It is not the type of book that one reads through in one sitting. Still it is a great reference work.
The field of Celtic scholarship has made some remarkable advances in recent years, and these articles offer a wonderful glimpse into a realm of information too often confined to the pages of academic journals. The writing is scholarly, but each article often points the way toward other resources on the same topic. I was particularly intrigued by Peter J. Reynolds' account of a typical agricultural year in the Celtic world, based on his experience running a re-created Iron Age farm.