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by Keith Reddin's dramatization of the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov,Keith Reddin,Mikhail Bulgakov
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Keith Reddin's dramatization of the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov,Keith Reddin,Mikhail Bulgakov
  • ISBN:
    0822213710
  • ISBN13:
    978-0822213710
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dramatists Play Service, Inc. (January 1998)
  • Pages:
    72 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1538 kb
  • ePUB format
    1263 kb
  • DJVU format
    1767 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    992
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf txt doc


Black Snow is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Bulgakov employs some brilliant metaficcional devices.

Black Snow is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. This apparent platitude is full of contradiction. The book is perhaps better described as an autobiographical episode, with Bulgakov renamed as the book’s central character, Maxudov. The novel that Maxudov adapted as a play is Bulgakov's very own "The White Guard" which in real life was also by him adapted into a play called "The Days Of The Turbins", which in turn was also played in the theatre and achieved significant sucess. Bulgakov also had to struggle with the same difficulties as Maxudov in his life; therefore the novel is extremely autobiographical.

Mikhail Bulgakov (1891 - 1940) was born and educated in Kiev where he graduated as a doctor in 1916. After a lifetime at odds with the stultifying Soviet regime, he died impoverished and blind in 1940, shortly after completing his masterpiece, The Master and Margarita. None of his major fiction was published during his lifetime.

Mikhail Bulgakov's Master & Margarita, or, The devil comes to Moscow/ adapted for a theater by Jean-Claude Van Itallie; from a translation of the novel by Sergei Kobiakoff. New York: Dramatists Play Service, 1995, 69 p. : ill. PG3572. 160. Mistr a Marketka The Master and Margarita. Praha: Odeon, 1990, 322 p. (Galerie klasiku). 161. Mistrz i Malgorzata The Master and Margarita, translated by Irena Lewandowska and Witold Dabrowski, adopted by Andrzej Drawicz. Wroclaw: Zaklad Narodowy im.

Keith Reddin’s dramatization of the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov an. .

Juilliard Drama presents Black Snow, Keith Reddin’s dramatization of the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov and directed by Dustin Wills. The play and the darkly satiric novel on which it’s based are inspired by Bulgakov’s own experiences with the Moscow Art Theatre and its renowned director, Konstantin Stanislavski, at the onset of Stalinist repression in the 1920’s. Read the press release.

The five, irreverant, satirical and imaginative stories contained in Diaboliad caused an uproar upon the book's first publication in 1925.

Part autobiography, part fiction, this early work by the author of The Master and Margarita shows a master at the dawn of his craft, and a nation divided by centuries of unequal progress. In 1916 a 25-year-old, newly qualified doctor named Mikhail Bulgakov was posted to the remote Russian countryside. The five, irreverant, satirical and imaginative stories contained in Diaboliad caused an uproar upon the book's first publication in 1925. Full of invention, they display Bulgakov's breathtaking stylistic range, moving at dizzying speed from grotesque satire to science fiction, from the plainest realism to the most madcap fantasy.

novel on which it’s based are inspired by Bulgakov’s own experiences .

In February, Juilliard Drama presents three plays in repertory: Crumbs From the Table of Joy by Lynn Nottage, directed by Melissa Maxwell; The Flick by Annie Baker, directed by Zi Alikhan; and Black Snow, Keith Reddin’s dramatization of the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, directed by Dustin Wills. The play and the darkly satiric novel on which it’s based are inspired by Bulgakov’s own experiences with the Moscow Art Theatre and its renowned director, Konstantin Stanislavski, at the onset of Stalinist repression in the 1920s.

This biting attack on censorship should appeal to every writer, says Sophia Martelli. Bulgakov is best known in the west for his surreal satire The Master and Margarita. However, early in his career he was a celebrated playwright who first achieved success by turning his novel The White Guard into the play The Days of the Turbins. Black Snow, written in the late 1930s but first published in 1967, is a delectable comedy revisiting this era, and sees him settling scores with the acting impresario Stanislavski for mutilating his work on stage. As such, it's a book for writers everywhere.

His satiric novel The Heart of a Dog was not published openly in the .

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Mikhail Afanasevich Bulgakov was a Russian playwright, novelist, and short-story writer best known for his use of humor and satire. He was born in Kiev, Ukraine, on May 15, 1891, and graduated from the Medical School of Kiev University in 1916. His satiric novel The Heart of a Dog was not published openly in the . Bulgakov's plays including Pushkin and Moliere dealt with artistic freedom.

Black Snow, based on the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, is written by Keith Reddin and directed by Glynis Rigsby with set design by Robin Vest, costume design by Jenny Mannis, lighting design by Scott Bolman, sound design by Jane Shaw, and stage management by Chris Clark. Member Actors Equity Association.

The ultimate back-stage novel and a brilliant satire by the author of The Master and Margarita on his ten-year love-hate relationship with Stanislavsky, Method Acting and the Moscow Arts Theatre.

Slowly writer
Bulgakov fictionalizes in BLACK SNOW his disastrous encounter with the Moscow Art Theatre, including Stanislavski himself, when the theatre commissioned him to write a play based on his first (unsuccessful) novel. The book is very funny in places, and his portrait of the chilly, neurotic, egomaniacal Stanislavski is worth the price of admission. There are also a couple of epic drunks, on the magnitude we usually encounter only in Russian fiction. Still, BLACK SNOW isn't as fine a book as THE MASTER AND MARGARITA, and people who come to it from that wonderful novl may feel let down.
Boraston
I stumbled across Mikhail Bulgakov completely by accident. I was reading up on Stanislavsky, the reknowned Russian acting teacher, and came across this little book as part of my research.
What followed was surely a possessed spell where I couldn't put it down. While truly biased, as being an actor, by the behind the scenes aspect of the mythological Moscow Art Theatre, I was more overcome by just how appetizing Bulgakov's prose truly is.
Bulgakov's absolute disregard for typical structure and wordflow are what makes him so readable. He truly captures the essence of lonliness and the absurdity any creative feels when they are mining the depths of imagination and the dread that follows with it's exposure.
While it may help to have a foot in the lore of Stanislavsky and the Art Theatre, I DO believe this work can stand on it's own. The only regret, I felt, was when it ended. It's quite abrupt and left me wanting an entire 'second half'.
But, then, as they say in theatre. 'Leave them wanting more.'
A great intro to futher reading of Bulgakov, if, like me, your just stumbling upon him.
Malak
Black Snow is a satirical retelling of Bulgakov's experiences in writing his first novel and play and working with the theater in Moscow. This volume has a forward which identifies some of the fictional names with the actual names of the individuals portrayed.
Unlike Bulgakov's other novels, this could occasionally improve by editing - a third of a page of jobs constituting all of humanity is a bit much. The characters are in general very specific personalities in which Bulgakov assumes that character recognition relieves him of the duty to provide fully fleshed out characters.
On the flip side, the novel is an amusing and telling romp through the hidden side of theater and Bulgakov's humorous skill is unscathed by the novel's shortcomings. Even well-worn humor such as mistaken names becomes fresh in Bulgadov's hands.
I recommend this book to theater and Bulgakov junkies; for others I would neither encourage nor discourage you from picking up the volume.
post_name
In this autobiographical novel, Bulgakov describes his experiences working with the Moscow Art Theatre of Stanislavsky and Nemirovich-Danchenko in the 1930's. The characters and situations are exaggerated to enhance the satire, and it is obviously not impartial, but it is extremely revealing nonetheless. This book, which is critical of Stanislavsky's method and the Soviet theatre scene of the 1930's, gives a moving portrait of a talented, dedicated author working against incredible odds. As usual in Bulgakov, satire is mixed with a serious message. Anyone interested in Bulgakov, the theatre, or Russian cultural history will enjoy this book.
Castiel
Saw parts of it presented for a UIL One Act & it was interesting & funny. Not sure how you'd go about staging the entire play though, as the cast is enormous. I also liked the twist at the end.
Akir
It came with lots of markings in it. The markings made it difficult to read. Although it came on time, I wasn't pleased with the shape it was in.
Xaluenk
Bulgakov's Theatrical Novel - which has been published both as Black Snow and as A Dead Man's Memoir - was never finished. The first part of the novel is complete, but Part Two is little more than a fragment. That being said, Black Snow is one of Bulgakov's most blisteringly funny works. The epilogue / post script reveals a plot twist not entirely justified by the text as it exists; I'm sure that were Part Two to have been completed the buildup tot his big reveal would be great reading. But what's the point of idle speculation? That this book has survived in any form is good news for readers (my outlook may be influenced by the fact that, as a Greek student, I'm used to fragmentary works-- half-sentences of Sappho and the like). Anyone who loves the Master and Margarita and doesn't mind fragments should at least give this a try.