» » Predicate Logic: The Semantic Foundations of Logic

Download Predicate Logic: The Semantic Foundations of Logic fb2

by Richard L. Epstein
Download Predicate Logic: The Semantic Foundations of Logic fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Richard L. Epstein
  • ISBN:
    0534558461
  • ISBN13:
    978-0534558468
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wadsworth Publishing; 1 edition (July 25, 2000)
  • Pages:
    412 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1970 kb
  • ePUB format
    1733 kb
  • DJVU format
    1157 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    562
  • Formats:
    lit mbr rtf mobi


Predicate Logic" by Richard Epstein contains a great deal of information on the philosophical foundations of predicate logic. It would be appropriate for an upper-division undergraduate seminar or even a graduate-level course in the foundations of logic.

Predicate Logic" by Richard Epstein contains a great deal of information on the philosophical foundations of predicate logic. However, if you are in the market for a text that teaches students how to actually do predicate logic, this is not it. Patrick Hurley's "A Concise Introduction to Logic" is far better suited for this purpose)

Richard L. Epstein received his doctorate in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Richard L. He is the author of eleven books, including two others in the series The Semantic Foundations of Logic (Propositional Logics and Predicate Logic), Five Ways of Saying "Therefore," Critical Thinking, and, with Walter Carnielli, Computability. He is head of the Advanced Reasoning Forum in Socorro, New Mexico. Библиографические данные. Classical Mathematical Logic: The Semantic Foundations of Logic.

Predicate Logic book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Predicate Logic: The Semantic Foundations of Logic. by. Richard L. Epstein.

by Richard L. An analysis of meaning and truth provides a foundation for studying modern propositional and predicate logics.

If logic is objective how can there be so many logics? Is there one right logic, or many right ones? Is there some underlying unity that connects them? What is the significance of the mathematical theorems about logic which I've.

If logic is objective how can there be so many logics? Is there one right logic, or many right ones? Is there some underlying unity that connects them? What is the significance of the mathematical theorems about logic which I've learned if they have no connection. The Semantic Foundations of Logic Volume 1: Propositional Logics. Authors: Epstein, .

This book presents modern logic as the formalization of reasoning that needs and deserves a semantic foundation. Over 120 worked examples illustrate the scope and limitations of modern logic, as analyzed in chapters on identity, quantifiers, descriptive names, and functions.

Classical Mathematical Logic: The Semantic Foundations of Logic The notions of qualities and predicates came to be highly restricted, being.

Classical Mathematical Logic: The Semantic Foundations of Logic. by Richard L Epstein and Leslaw W. Szczerba. In Classical Mathematical Logic, Richard L. Epstein relates the systems of mathematical logic to their original motivations to formalize reasoning in mathematics. The book also shows how mathematical logic can be used to formalize particular systems of mathematics. The notions of qualities and predicates came to be highly restricted, being identified in formal logic with their extensions (Chapter IX).

Author : Richard L. Publisher : Wadsworth Publishing Company. Users who liked this book, also liked. Wittgenstein: A Guide for the Perplexed (English). Philosophy of Logics - Life and Art (English). The Emergent Self: An Existential-Gestalt Approach (United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy Series) (English).

Semantic foundations of logic.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Predicate logic from your list? Predicate logic. the semantic foundations of logic. by Richard L. Published 2001 by Wadsworth Thomson Learning in Belmont, CA. Written in English. Semantic foundations of logic. 412 p. ; Number of pages.

I would highly recommend this book to not only readers like myself who have an active growing interest in logic, but also to the more professional er scientist who has a deep working knowledge of current logic theory. Both groups, in my opinion, would profit from being exposed to Epstein's theory. -W. Truszkowski, SIGART Bulletin "Chapter 9 on translation between logics. is perhaps the most interesting chapter of the book.

A presentation of the fundamental ideas that generate the formal systems of predicate logic. This text clearly relates predicate logic to reasoning in ordinary language, with hundreds of examples of formalization, with a clear theory of how to formalize ordinary arguments. The writing is exceptionally clear and easy to read.

რฉςh
"Why, not how" is accurate, but the point can be amplified.
This is NOT a practical text in any way; it is a highly formal, rigorous logical treatise. It does not teach predicate logic, but sets out to formalize this author's particular definition or systematization of it. It may be useful if you're a logician (or play one on TV), and want to know the bases for predicate logic, its scope and limitations, and really mull over each assumption it makes, one by one.
Having forked out $30 for it on Amazon, I felt obligated to trudge through it, but I can't really say that it's helped me much. Some of the philosophical points are interesting, but it really wasn't what I was looking for.
Really, my 3 stars are generous. For my use it was a 1, and I'm not really qualified to judge it on its own terms. So I waffled.
Kaim
"Predicate Logic" by Richard Epstein contains a great deal of information on the philosophical foundations of predicate logic and is most appropriate for an upper-division undergraduate seminar or a graduate-level course in the foundations of logic. If you're looking for a text that teaches students how to do predicate logic, this is not it. (Patrick Hurley's "A Concise Introduction to Logic" is far better suited for this purpose.) This book doesn't show students in an understandable way how to derive conclusions from premises while using the predicate calculus. Moreover, its "exercises," which can be found after various sections, simply do not emphasize such derivations, nor are any of the answers to these exercises found in the back of the book. (Many, perhaps most logic texts make use of this learning tool.) (If you are interested in the philosophical foundations of predicate logic and are willing to plow through some technical material, you may find this book worth reading. If you want to learn how to do predicate logic, other logic texts that covers the predicate calculus are far more useful.
Shliffiana
During my 30 years of teaching philosophy I have used several logic textbooks and have many more on my shelves. "Predicate Logic" by Richard Epstein contains a great deal of information on the philosophical foundations of predicate logic. It would be appropriate for an upper-division undergraduate seminar or even a graduate-level course in the foundations of logic. However, if you are in the market for a text that teaches students how to actually do predicate logic, this is not it. Patrick Hurley's "A Concise Introduction to Logic" is far better suited for this purpose). This book simply doesn't show students in any meaningful way how to derive conclusions from premises while using the predicate calculus. Moreover, its "exercises," which can be found after various sections, simply do not emphasize this, nor are any of the answers to these exercises found in the back of the book (a learning tool that most logic texts follow but which, for some reason, Epstein apparently did not feel was necessary). If you are interested in the philosophical foundations of predicate logic and are willing to plow through some rather technical material, you may find this book worth reading. If you want to become facile in doing predicate logic, most any other logic text that covers the predicate calculus would be preferable.
Mayno
$105? You jest. Ted Sider's "Logic for Philosophy" is epically good at $25. No logic text is worth this kind of money when there are fantastic texts from great logicians available.
Jare
I have taught philosophy for thirty years, including many sections of logic, at the college level. During this period of time I have used several logic textbooks and have many more (most of which I have gone over in detail) on my shelves. "Predicate Logic" by Richard Epstein contains a great deal of information on the philosophical foundations of predicate logic. As such, it would be appropriate for an upper-division undergraduate seminar in the foundations of logic or even a graduate-level course in that area. However, if you are in the market for a text that teaches students how to actually do predicate logic, this is not the text. (I would suggest Patrick Hurley's "A Concise Introduction to Logic" as ideally suited for this purpose). This book simply doesn't show students in any meaningful way how to derive conclusions from premises while using the predicate calculus. Moreover, its "exercises," which can be found after various sections, simply do not emphasize this, nor are any of the answers to these exercises found in the back of the book (a learning tool that most logic texts follow but which, for some reason, Epstein apparently did not feel was necessary). Once again, if you are interested in the philosophical foundations of predicate logic and are willing to plow through some rather technical material, you may find this book worth reading. If you want to become facile in doing predicate logic, most any other logic text that covers the predicate calculus would be preferable.