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by Ronald Long
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Ronald Long
  • ISBN:
    1560231513
  • ISBN13:
    978-1560231516
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (August 4, 2004)
  • Pages:
    198 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1684 kb
  • ePUB format
    1695 kb
  • DJVU format
    1648 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    835
  • Formats:
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Getting over the fear of homosexuality and passivity would allow all men to discover they can be lovers as well as soldiers.

In Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective, he’s written an interesting and readable book that surveys variations in the way religion has treated homosexuality through the years. Getting over the fear of homosexuality and passivity would allow all men to discover they can be lovers as well as soldiers. Indeed, that they can stop seeing sex as war and war as sexy.

Start by marking Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An. .

Start by marking Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Compare worldwide religious regulations involving gay sex and masculinity! Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male. 1 person is interested in this title. We receive 2 copies every 6 months. Compare worldwide religious regulations involving gay sex and masculinity Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective is an eye-opening look at the traditions of particular religions and their edicts concerning gay sex.

Series: Haworth gay & lesbian studies

Series: Haworth gay & lesbian studies. Confirm this request.

Compare worldwide religious regulations involving gay sex and masculinity! Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective is an eye-opening look at the traditions of particular religions and their.

Compare worldwide religious regulations involving gay sex and masculinity! Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective is an eye-opening look at the traditions of particular religions and their edicts concerning gay se.

Haworth gay & lesbian studies. Gay rights as a freedom of religion issue. The spiritual challenge of contemporary homophile movements. Toward a new poetic of masculinity. What of homosexuality Holy homosexuality : om men and semen: The Sambians of Papua New Guinea : it will make a man of you. The Taoists of ancient China and the preservation of life Holy homoeroticism : splendid men and splendor divine: Plato and the world of ancient Athens. The platonism of Islamic Sufism Holy effeminacy : the Native American berdache as a living war charm: Men and manhood.

Men, homosexuality, and the Gods: an exploration into the religious significance of male homosexuality in world perspective. ISBN 978-1-56023-152-3. AVESTA: Vendidad: FARGARD 8. Funerals and purification, unlawful sex. religioustolerance. org – The Zoroastrian Faith and Homosexuality. php?title Zoroastrianism and sexual orientation&oldid 865661701".

Homosexuality: A Psychoanalytic Study of Male Homosexuals is a 1962 book about the development of male homosexuality by the psychoanalyst Irving Bieber, and his psychoanalyst co-authors Harvey J. Dain, Paul R. Dince, Marvin G. Drellich, Henry G. Gran. Grand, Ralph R. Gundlach, Malvina W. Kremer, Alfred H. Rifkin, Cornelia B. Wilbur, and Toby B. Bieber. The authors maintain that psychoanalytic treatment can in some cases convert homosexuals to heterosexuality.

An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective

An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective.

Gay and Lesbian Rights in Confucian Asia: The Cases of Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan. The prevalence of male homosexuality probably varies over time and across societies. Because of these effects, the rate of male homosexuality.

Compare worldwide religious regulations involving gay sex and masculinity! Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective is an eye-opening look at the traditions of particular religions and their edicts concerning gay sex. This book examines the origins of holy directives involving homosexuality—whether forbidden, tolerated, or mandatory—and establishes a link between theology, sex roles, and the sensitive issue of masculinity. This text draws a parallel between homosexuality and the idea of religion, suggesting that gay rights can be understood as a freedom of religion issue. While most readers are familiar with the traditional Islamic, Christian, and Hebrew prohibitions against sex between two males, this book also reveals other historic religions from around the world that neither opposed nor looked down on homosexuality. Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods argues that masculinity is the universal theme that formed historical interpretation—warriors and men of high status could not be sexually receptive or “feminine” and still be called “men.” This intriguing text shows how the modern homophile movements are in effect redefining masculinity to obliterate the stigma of being a sexually receptive man. Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods examines the significance of homosexuality in such religions as: the Sambians of New Guinea the Taoists of Ancient China Plato and the later Stoics Islamic Sufism Native American culture Hebrew Scriptures early Christianity Buddhism Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods is an enlightening book that honors homosexual claims to moral integrity and appreciates religion and religious figures without rancor. Easy-to-read and free of technical language, this volume is for anyone who has an academic, professional, or personal interest in theology and homosexuality. The author is available for speaking engagements and can be contacted at [email protected]

Xanna
It is a good book.It goes, in some way, to the gay history through the time. The only problem is the level of the English language. It is very high.
So, if your English is not that good or if you have never been to a university, probably you will take time to read this book.
Tantil
This review of the first edition appeared in White Crane Journal #63 Winter 2004/05

Ron Long is a teacher of religion at Hunter College of the City University of New York. He’s an active member of the Steering Committee of the Gay Men’s Issues in Religion Group of the American Academy of Religion.

In Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods: An Exploration into the Religious Significance of Male Homosexuality in World Perspective, he’s written an interesting and readable book that surveys variations in the way religion has treated homosexuality through the years. He deals with a rich (though, he acknowledges, intentionally not exhaustive) variety of traditions: primitive Papua New Guinean, ancient Taoist Chinese, Classical Greek, Islamic Sufi, Biblical era Hebrew, Early Christian, Native American, Buddhist, down to modern gay political and cultural movements, including antidiscrimination laws, gays in the military, and gay marriage.

The book is full of delightful tid-bits about homosexual behaviors throughout human history. Some of these discussions are familiar, like Plato’s report of Aristophanes’ story of the original androgynes or the exegesis of the Bible passages about male to male intercourse. But some are relatively new to the discussion, like the Sufi spiritual practice of gazing at the beauty of young men to see God and the Buddhist quest for loss of self-consciousness in sexual ecstasy as an experience of emptiness and mutual co-arising.

The interesting and curious aspect of the analysis is its concern with the mechanics of male-male sex. Long says, “Simply put, the thesis of this book is that religious evaluations of homosexual love and sex depend upon the way male ‘bottoming’ is construed—as does the resistance to male homosexuality in the contemporary period.” He argues that “the revolutionary importance of the contemporary gay rights movement lies in its—by no means clearly articulated as yet—revolutionary idea of gender, that male sexual receptivity is part of the repertoire of a normal, adult, fully masculine male.”

The rather lyrical and touching conclusion of the book is that what homosexuality challenges is the notion that sex is about penetrating other bodies, doing something to someone else who has been rendered passive, that is, that it’s a kind of war. The male homosexual movement by insisting on the masculinity of the penetrated party, the bottom, Long says, is a movement for the spiritual liberation of all men. Getting over the fear of homosexuality and passivity would allow all men to discover they can be lovers as well as soldiers. Indeed, that they can stop seeing sex as war and war as sexy.

Long has interesting takes on some of the familiar history. He offers insights and explanations that are sometimes surprisingly new and particularly incisive. You’ll be glad you read this book. It will expand your understanding of things you’ve heard before.

The book is clearly written for an audience unfamiliar with these gay religious issues, i.e., the author’s students at Hunter College. What that means is that it seems to appear totally out of context and relatively unaware of the gay spirituality movement or the conventions of gay cultural conversation: Long uses the word “homophile,” for instance, as though it were a serviceable synonym for homosexual, rather than a slightly antiquated term that now defines an era in early gay organizing. “Homophile,” the term embraced by the pre-gay liberation activists of the Mattachine Society days, is not quite as out-of-date as that embraced by the mid-19th century Europeans, “Uranians,” but it comes across glaring every time.

This seeming unawareness of the contemporary movement shows up in the absence of any recognition of gay religion outside the academy (by which I mean the “university environment,” but maybe also the American Academy of Religion made up of university professors). There’s no acknowledgement of Mark Thompson or Christian de la Huerta (or Toby Johnson, for that matter), no reference to Harry Hay or Joseph Kramer or the Radical Faeries, not even Troy Perry and the MCC. I have to admit I was disappointed to see that a “synthesis” of gay spirituality and religion wouldn’t even recognize what I think of—and write about—as the “gay men’s spirituality movement.” College professors talking to college professors without ever observing the real world! I think that examining the ideas about the nature and transformation of religion implied by gay spirituality is much more interesting and fruitful than rehashing all that stuff about the Bible. (Aren’t we done with that yet? It’s time to stop caring what those desert nomads were spooked by five thousand years ago.)

By coincidence (?), just as I was finishing the book, there was a convention of the American Academy of Religion in San Antonio. I was invited by Mark Jordan to attend a reception for the gay caucus. I learned that the night before Ron Long and another member of the caucus had been invited to participate in a roundtable discussion of gay marriage AND had been ambushed by the Fundamentalists on the other side. Long had presented a well-reasoned and Biblically-based discussion regarding gay marriage. But it wasn’t a roundtable of honored equals; the gay speakers been invited in order to be excoriated, condemned, told they were going to hell, and made fools of by the other side.

So while I want to complain that Ron Long’s book doesn’t recognize my and my peers’ contributions to his discussion of the meaning of gay spirituality, I want also to honor him and his peers in the Academy of Religion. These men are doing difficult work; they are contending with powerful forces and people who really do think those desert nomads’ opinions matter and should be enforced by law on the rest of us; these gay religion professors are putting themselves, literally, in harms’ way for the sake of protecting all us homosexuals from misguided religion. Ron Long and his fellow professors are truly saints.

There’s much to learn in this book. The discussion about tops and bottoms alone is worth the reading. I wonder if the book might bring the word “homophile” back into use.

Reviewed by Toby Johnson, author of Gay Spirituality: Gay Identity and the Transformation of Human Consciousness, The Myth of the Great Secret: An Appreciation of Joseph Campbell and other novels and books
Cells
I stumbled upon a mention of this book in someone's blog and was immediately interested because I was expecting a juicy examination of images of Pagan Gods in relation to gay male psychology and identity, and perhaps spiritual practice. (Books that examine images of Gods in relation to men usually tend to be quasi-Jungian redux-- like GODS IN EVERYMAN by Jean Shinoda Bolen or those written by Robert Bly camp followers, and the rarer ones that relate to current Pagan practice tend to be cursory overviews with the intent of introducing the reader to "Paganism 101"-- this includes even the one such book specifically targeted to gay men, THE PATH OF THE GREEN MAN by Michael Thomas Ford.)

Instead, what I received-- thru interlibrary loan, so thankfully I did not waste my money on this dull book-- was a vapid rehash of historical material relating primarily to how major monotheisms (and a few indigenous cultures) accepted or did not accept homosexuality in men. Plus a very dull continuing exegesis on "topping' and "bottoming" as seen through these cultures, blah blah blah. I suspect others who have sought out this book were similarly mislead by the use of the words "the Gods" in the title. A more accurate title, which would have placed this book on the correct heap of existing material-- material has been covered before, and by more interesting writers-- would have been "MEN, HOMOSEXUALITY, AND RELIGION," etc.

"Gods" in general are *personifications* of the numinous (a term I am using because it embraces the mythic, the mythopoetic, the spiritual, the religious, the archetypal, etc.)-- or more specifically, *aspects* of the numinous. I deal in images of Gods because I am a mythopoeic artist (for examples, you can see my work at paulruckerart.com). In a sentence, I believe that human consciousness meets the Mystery/ that which is Numinous halfway by giving it humanlike (or at least familiar animal-like) attributes. This allows us to create sacred theatre, iconic art,and in a Pagan way, participate in the Mystery in a manner not possible in a monotheism where "God" supposedly encompasses everything.

The Gods, as I am interested in them, are almost not present at all in this book. Other reviewers have judged more sharply the academic content of the material in this book. If I cared enough, I would. Rather, I would like to point readers to more fruitful discussion of Pagan Gods in relation to gay men, in case you too were following a similarly false trail.

Top of this list: CASSELL'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF QUEER MYTH, SYMBOL AND SPIRIT: GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER LORE by Randy P. Conner, David Sparks, and Mariya Sparks. (Disclaimer: My image of "The Androgyne" is featured on the back of this book, which is how I found out about it back in 1997. However, no other book dealing with GBLT in relation to myth and the numinous has come close to this masterwork. I also have an interesting story on my website about how my model for "The Androgyne" met Randy Conner years after its publication.) Also by Randy P. Conner: BLOSSOM OF BONE-- RECLAIMING THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN HOMOEROTICISM AND THE SACRED.

ANOTHER MOTHER TONGUE: GAY WORDS, GAY WORLDS by Judy Grahn (a groundbreaking classic)

GAY SOUL: FINDING THE HEART OF GAY SPIRIT AND NATURE by Mark Thompson (thoughtful essays that go past the "101" approach in connecting gayness with a spiritual life)

MYTH AND SEXUALITY by Jamake Highwater (Highwater is a gay Native American, whose work examines art, myth, culture)

and, for now--

THE HIDDEN SPIRITUALITY OF MEN-- TEN METAPHORS[*]TO AWAKEN THE SACRED MASCULINE by Matthew Fox (*"Metaphors" is his word to re-context the somewhat overused "archetype").
This book deals with homosexuality only in the general context of revisioning numinous masculinity. What impressed me most was his inclusion of radically new "metaphors" that no other "men's studies" authors have offered. In addition to fairly familar faces-- "Father Sky," "the Green Man," and "the Warrior" he presents "Earth Father," "Grandfather Sky"-- and! "The Blue Man." Honestly, I bought the book just for that chapter, because "the Blue Man" is the Divine Face that has mattered most to me in my art and in sacred theatre performance.

Hopefully the above examples will prove inspiring!
MisterMax
An excellently thought out analysis of several religions and their views on sexuality. Long supposes that historically, sex has been treated as war in the bedroom, even if such war-play is pleasurable, ultimately it has become a crossroads of power and domination, which in is institutionalized through religious teachings. Through his thorough research, he is able to construct a case for how the human psyche came to attribute supernatural/religious significance to the mundane realities of sexual evolution.

Some of his views run slightly counter to the more mainstream teachings of Women's/Gender Studies departments, but his work makes for a great companion text for any such courses.
Opimath
This book was very disappointing, by the title you would think that this book has useful information about the different religions and how homosexuality plays a part in that religion. I could only force myself to read half of this book before I got sick of the author constantly talking about homosexuality as humiliating and ridiculous. Having researched Native American tradition and Wicca I have come to know that neither of these traditions look down on homosexuality as being humiliation or ridiculous. This book is not at all what it appears to be.