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by L. Anne Babb
Download Ethics in American Adoption fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    L. Anne Babb
  • ISBN:
    089789538X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0897895385
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Praeger; 2 edition (May 30, 1999)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1731 kb
  • ePUB format
    1847 kb
  • DJVU format
    1644 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    993
  • Formats:
    lit rtf mbr mobi


Ethics In American Adoption is a benchmark publication in the fields of ethics and adoption. offers numerous case studies describing what is amiss with America's adoption system as it is currently constituted

Ethics In American Adoption is a benchmark publication in the fields of ethics and adoption. offers numerous case studies describing what is amiss with America's adoption system as it is currently constituted. This seminal work should be read by policy makers, social workers, children's court judges, prospective adopters, and anyone else involved in the adoption process. -Wisconsin Bookwatch, August 1999

Ethics in American Adoption book.

Ethics in American Adoption book. Today in the United States there is a lack of consensus about.

Home Browse Books Book details, Ethics in American Adoption. Ethics in American Adoption. Although ethics in adoption is a hot topic, adoption specialists and professionals are unsure about how to serve the best interests of children who need to be adopted and how birth parents, adoptive parents, and adult adoptees ought to be served. This failure to identify and prioritize ethical standards in adoption has resulted in a lack of ethical decision-making and inadequate-and sometimes of those seeking adoption-related services.

Today in the United States there is a lack of consensus about what constitutes ethical practice in adoption.

Xxvi, 235 pages ; 25 cm. Destined to be seminal in the fields of ethics and adoption, this book offers numerous case studies describing what is wrong with America's adoption system.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 217-226) and index.

Books: Ethics In American Adoption (Bergin & Garvey) & Adopting and Advocating for the Special Needs Child (Bergin .

Books: Ethics In American Adoption (Bergin & Garvey) & Adopting and Advocating for the Special Needs Child (Bergin & Garvey). PagesPublic figureAuthorL Anne Babb PhDAbout.

oceedings{Babb1999EthicsIA, title {Ethics in American Adoption}, author {Lawrence A. Babb . Babb and Randolph Severson}, year {1999} . Foreword by Randolph Severson Introduction Foundations Living the Experience Values in Adoption Explorations Ethical Inquiry Ethical Codes Influencing Adoption Practice Contentions When Professional Values Collide Recommendations Recommended Model for Ethical Standards in Adoption Challenges Challenges to Change Appendix A: Resources Appendix B: Are You Considering Adoption?

Anne Babb, an adoption advocate asserts in her book Ethics in American Adoption that "when money is as central to a human service as it is in adoption practice, money not only drives the process, but it also shapes the results.

Anne Babb, an adoption advocate asserts in her book Ethics in American Adoption that "when money is as central to a human service as it is in adoption practice, money not only drives the process, but it also shapes the results. This leads to the argument that the adoption process perpetuates the commoditization of children.

American Adoptions is one of the largest non-profit licensed domestic adoption agencies in the nation. American Adoptions provides a full range of services to adoptive families and birth parents. When using social media, it’s important to remember that the adoption process is not only your story, but your child’s story, and the way you tell that story could impact all parties involved. Do Orphanages Still Exist in America? While many children still need permanent homes, today’s domestic adoptions no longer involve traditional orphanages. orphanages have been replaced with the foster care system and private agencies.

Today in the United States there is a lack of consensus about what constitutes ethical practice in adoption. Although ethics in adoption is a hot topic, adoption specialists and professionals are unsure about how to serve the best interests of children who need to be adopted and how birth parents, adoptive parents, and adult adoptees ought to be served. This failure to identify and prioritize ethical standards in adoption has resulted in a lack of ethical decision-making and inadequate―and sometimes fraudulent―treatment of those seeking adoption-related services.

Destined to be seminal in the fields of ethics and adoption, this books offers numerous case studies describing what is wrong with America's adoption system, illustrating what the lack of applied ethical standards in adoption does to adoptees and those who love them, and raising many questions about what adoption facilitators are doing, who is accountable for what they are doing, and whose interests they are serving.


Flamekiller
This is truly one of the best books I have read on adoption and I have done quite extensive research on the subject. Babb states that "...were Congress to convene a congressional committee to investigate and document the effects of nonregulation of adoption on adoption clients, there is no doubt that the written testimony of those affected would fill volumes" (p. 190). My own international adoption nightmare would be one of the testimonies filling those pages. This book is the first I have read that is clear, concise, insightful, and cogent. While Babb is passionate about the issue of ethics in adoption, her arguments are not emotionally laden to the point of being banal. She clearly outlines the benefits to all parties of the adoption triad, as well as child welfare as a whole, were adoption to be professionalized and a code of ethics created with "...nationally accepted standards of behavior defining the professional's obligations to clients, colleagues, and society" (p. 191).

The one contention I have is some of the specific tenets of Babb's Recommended Model for Ethical Standards in Adoption. One of these is the professional's responsibility to the adoptee in which she states that one responsibility is to protect the child's right to grow up with his or her family of origin. In today's society there is a glorification, to the point of idolatry in my opinion, of the blood related family and calls for family preservation at all costs. While laudable efforts should be made to preserve or reunify the family, the ultimate responsibility of the professional, and society, is to protect the child and his or her innate right to a family. We need to approach family preservation with cautious optimism rather than reverence lest we fail to protect the child that we claim to work in the best interests of.
Flocton
L. Anne Babb, an adoption professional, has written a book that essentially concerns the issue of raising the ethical standards practiced by adoption practitioners in the USA. I write my review, as an adoptive parent who is somewhat familiar with the adoption system, and adoption practices.
Unquestionably, serious problems do exist. Some of these problems include practices that keep adoptees from being able to access family history and health information (the open records problem), the lack of regulation and standards that are imposed on adoption agencies and attorneys by the states in which they practice, outright dishonesty by certain practitioners, and the unavailability of appropriate counseling services for all triad members served by agencies. Babb reviews these problems and provides a history of adoption in America.
Babb also does a respectable job of reviewing different standards that have been compiled with respect to international adoption. She mentions standards developed by the Child Welfare League of America and the United Nations. As part of it, she reviews provisons of the CRC (Convention on the Rights of Children) that has recently been ratified by the US Senate.
She surveyed adoption professionals about different aspects of adoption practices and reports the conclusions of the surveys. I noted, interestingly, that none of her survey participants appeared to be from any private adoption agencies--no matter what their reputation was. However, all 50 of the state licensors of public adoption agencies were surveyed, as well as 22 "child welfare organizations", among these groups were the Concerned United Birthparents (a group which has historically been opposed to most of adoption) and the National Association of Black Social Workers, which in 1972, called interracial adoption "genocide". Given the fact that most adoption is done privately in the USA, it was not a surprise to me that many of the survey participants found fault with many aspects of adoption practices. One curious finding of the survey was how many of the surveyed participants when asked to define "best interest of the child" proceeded to articulate as their three most important criteria, subjects that dealt with the birth family keeping the child in the first place. The conclusions were interesting, overall, but the survey could hardly be called representative of adoption professionals, where no private agencies appear to have been represented. At times, survey answers appeared ridiculous. When asked what a reasonable adoption fee was, 27 survey participants, out of 73, felt that it should be less than....
The book is simply too idealistic. Granted reforms are needed in terms of open records, and laws that are blatantly one-sided. However, to give an example, Babb suggests as a standard for reform, that the costs of running adoption agencies be paid for through taxes, or some method other than through adoptive, and prospective adoptive couples. What she essentially advocates is the abolition of private adoption agencies and making adoption a state-run program. In my opinion, private adoption would become virtually impossible if it were paid for in this fashion. I won't digress on the advantages/disadvantages of abolishing private adoption, simply because it isn't going to happen. Private adoption providers and adoption attorneys, as well as conservative and heavily financed pro-adoption groups like the NCFA aren't going to allow it to happen. Such groups will lobby legislatures to prevent these changes and possess far more power than those who want them.
What I felt after finishing the book is that the author provided some excellent history and background information and addressed an important issue, changing unethical adoption practices. The book is well-written and its not hard to follow where the author is going. However, the author's cause, adoption reform, might be better served by being less idealistic and more practical. Reforms could be accomplished by imposing caps or limitations on fees charged by private agencies (that reflect real costs) and by forcing agencies to itemize to prospective adoptive parents exactly what their money is going for. Other reforms that are not radical, but would be helpful, include general support for open records laws for adoptees and simply mandating that all adoptions take place through a state licensed agency. (as opposed to facilitators and attorneys doing adoptions). This is a more modest agenda, which might ultimately be successful....