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by Jay Winter
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Jay Winter
  • ISBN:
    0521639883
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521639880
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press; Reprint edition (March 28, 1998)
  • Pages:
    322 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1138 kb
  • ePUB format
    1715 kb
  • DJVU format
    1259 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    995
  • Formats:
    azw doc mbr mobi


X, 310 pages : 24 cm. Jay Winter's powerful new study of the collective remembrance of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century.

X, 310 pages : 24 cm. Using a great variety of literary, artistic, and architectural evidence, Dr. Winter looks anew at the culture of commemoration, and the ways in which communities endeavoured to find collective solace after 1918

Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century.

Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century. Dr Winter looks anew at the culture of commemoration and the ways in which communities endeavoured to find collective solace after 1918. Taking issue with the prevailing 'modernist' interpretation of the European reaction to the appalling events of 1914-18.

The Great War in European Cultural History. Tensions arose inevitably. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning is a profound and moving book of seminal importance for the attempt to understand the course of European history during the first half of the twentieth century. No one interested in the broad impact of the First World War, or the cultural history of the twentieth century, can afford to neglect this book. Source: The Times Literary Supplement.

It's a question Jay Winter gives an ample airing.

Its goal is to trace the cultural artifacts that wars produce- the statues, the books, the memorials, and the less tangible but still vital struggles over how the war's meaning should be interpreted. It's a question Jay Winter gives an ample airing.

Tensions arose inevitably. Memorials are public sites that promote memory of the collective past

Tensions arose inevitably. Memorials are public sites that promote memory of the collective past. Over the last century, a new counter-memorial form has emerged that focused on victims and trauma through a minimalist and immersive architecture that many have claimed opens up for a diversity of ways of experiencing and interacting with them. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History. Jay Winter's powerful 1998 study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century.

Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century

Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century. Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century.

Jay Winter's powerful study of the collective remembrance of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one . A humanistic approach to understanding the cultural impact of the Great War. By Thriftbooks. com User, April 8, 2009.

Jay Winter's powerful study of the collective remembrance of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history o. . Shortly before his death, Otto von Bismarck ominously predicted that, "if there is ever another war in Europe, it will come out of some damned silly thing in the Balkans.

Jay Murray Winter (born 28 May 1945) is an American historian. series Canto Classics.

Jay Winter's powerful study of the "collective remembrance" of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century. Dr. Winter looks anew at the culture of commemoration and the ways in which communities endeavored to find collective solace after 1918. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning is a profound and moving book of great importance for the attempt to understand the course of European history during the first half of the twentieth century.

Dibei
Amazing work of historiographical literature which transforms the social historic views you never know you had about the First World War. History has forever lacked emotions about the politicized WWI until now. This book discovers mourning and the hidden generation in an intriguing mind discovering way.
Marinara
Very emotional book and the story it told was great. The way it interpreted the paintings and the beliefs of the people and the monuments they built in honor of the soldiers who gave their lives for their country.
Ballardana
A fine recitation of the mess that was WWI and it's aftermath. It's still not over!
Oreavi
Shortly before his death, Otto von Bismarck ominously predicted that, "if there is ever another war in Europe, it will come out of some damned silly thing in the Balkans." The Chancellor's premonition articulated into reality on June 28th, 1914, as the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand in combination with a monolithic bipolar political system, abetted the onset of the Great War, the deadliest combat yet known in the human experience. The age of nationalism, heralded by many as a period of universal human progress, soon wallowed in the midst of nearly nine million lifeless bodies of young men; many mutilated beyond recognition or reparation. During the Great War, nearly all European families personally suffered the loss of a son, brother or father, fostering a universal sense of loss during the interwar period. In Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History, Jay Winter juxtaposes poetry, film, literature, paintings and war memorials produced in Germany, France and Great Britain during the interwar period, and finds "striking convergences in the experience of loss and search for meaning in all combatant countries" (11). For Winter, analyzing European cultural history during the interwar through the lens of the nation-state is an erroneous approach, as the commonalities in bereavement practices amongst all combatant nations illustrate "an unmistakable sign of the commonality of European life" (227).
A second goal of Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning is to challenge hegemonic opinions held by cultural and art historians whom commonly interpret the Great War as signifier of a new epoch of cultural history. Academic circles of cultural and art historians, headlined by Fussell and Hynes, compartmentalize pictorial and literary works of art produced during the Great War and interwar period as the harbingers of modernism. Fussell and Hynes maintain that after the Great War, European artists broke away from Romantic and positivist themes in their works, and instead interpreted history as remote, discontinuous, and inaccessible. Winter completely rejects this interpretation centered on the Great War as catalyzing the dichotomy between Romanticism and modernism. By divulging into artistic works seeking to explain the great personal losses suffered by Europeans, Winter finds that European bereavement practices "triggered an avalanche of the `unmodern,'" evidenced by the apocalyptic imagery utilized by European painters such as Kandinsky and Meidner, the creation on nationalistic war myths such as the French imagerie d'Epinal, and the popularity of spiritualist beliefs amongst the families of deceased soldiers (179). Further, Winter dismisses the differentiation placed on "high" and "low" forms during the interwar period as a fallacious, as both gazed back on traditional forms of artistic expression to express their grief.
Winter maintains that European internalized the atrocities and death of the Great War and World War II through profoundly different means, citing Adorno's adage that "to write lyric poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric" (228). Winter however, fails to adequately support this claim with an analysis of World War II artistic cultural artifacts. Without evidence, Winter leaves the reader skeptical of the dichotomy he places in the cultural response of the two wars, particularly as his book is centered on breaking down the cultural dichotomies of others. For after all, are not the preserved barren concentration camps and the Kaiser Wilhelm Church sites of memory and mourning serving to assist individuals internalize their own grief and loss caused by World War II?
Monam
Great reading.
Kit
Interesting research, informative and well-written.
It's so easy
This is an incredibly focused, well-organized, and accessible piece of scholarship that sets itself a task that is straightforward, though far from simple. Its goal is to trace the cultural artifacts that wars produce- the statues, the books, the memorials, and the less tangible but still vital struggles over how the war's meaning should be interpreted.

Most of the book focuses on the struggle to interpret the war while it was being fought, and in the immediate wake of the war, with the battle over meaning mostly between uber-patriots and those whose time in the charnel house turned them either into revolutionaries or religious mystics. Did the men in the trenches die for some ultimate meaning, or die for nothing? It's a question Jay Winter gives an ample airing. And here lies perhaps my only quibble, that some of the aspects of memorializing I found most interesting seemed a bit condensed, in comparison to this theme, or that of the dead returning from their graves to accuse the living of various crimes. Though it is ultimately the researcher's prerogative to dwell where he finds the greatest wellspring, for me a longer section on poetry (commensurate in length and depth to this section) would have been preferable.

Lastly, another area in which Herr Winter deserves especial credit is in making his analysis of artifacts balanced between the three main principles of the Great War, France, Britain, and Germany. Not to denigrate the contributions of other lands, including my own home of America, but these were the nations that were bled white in the combat and experienced the greatest sea change in consciousness as a result of the apocalypses at the Somme or Marne. Too many studies on this subject inevitably favor the doomed Oxford Dons of the English perspective, or the expressionistic nihilism of the German perspective (letting the French romantic, religious, and revolutionary currents get lost in the discourse). The historian in question here not only pays attention to the contributions of all three unfortunate nations, but shows, through his own diligence and keenness, how these lands had much more in common than most other historians have heretofore shown. Recommended, in any case.