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by Donald Fixico
Download The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Donald Fixico
  • ISBN:
    0415944570
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415944571
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (June 20, 2003)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1274 kb
  • ePUB format
    1396 kb
  • DJVU format
    1999 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    860
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi lrf mbr


Leonard Bruguier, University of South Dakota.

Donald Fixico is an American writer and intellectual. He is a Distinguished Foundation Professor of History at Arizona State University. He was the Thomas Bowlus Distinguished Professor of American Indian History, CLAS Scholar and the founding Director of the Center for Indigenous Nations Studies at the University of Kansas. He is a policy historian and ethno-historian. Fixico is of the Shawnee, Sac and Fox, Muscogee Creek, and Seminole tribes.

Start by marking The American Indian Mind in a Linear World . Fixico drew me into considering how much the Euro American concept of learning comes from linear instruction (think IKEA furniture).

Start by marking The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I read this book as part of a class for my master's program in Intercultural Studies as part of the North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies (NAIITS) for the class Theology & Praxis of Pedagogy. Fixico drew me into considering how much the Euro American concept of learning comes from linear instruction (think IKEA furniture), where you start with step 1. Indigenous learning often came at introducing the complex first, welcoming the learner into fascination and wonder.

Indian philosophy Indians of North America. Native American Philosophy in Philosophy of the Americas. Similar books and articles. categorize this paper). Added to PP index 2015-02-13.

The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge. Termination and Relocation: Federal Indian Policy, 1945-1960. The Urban Indian Experience in America.

He is an American Indian (Shawnee, Sac and Fox, Muscogee Creek, Seminole). Country of Publication.

American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge. Books related to The American Indian Mind in a Linear World. Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask. Anton Treuer. All the Real Indians Died Off". Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz.

Case Studies in Immunology. The Molecules of Life. Living in a Microbial World. Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this may cause. He is an American Indian (Shawnee, Sac and Fox, Muscogee Creek, Seminole). Donald Fixico, a leading historian of the indigenous experience, writes with a powerful voice from Indian Country.

Addresses current approaches to studying Native American traditional knowledge and acknowledges an Indian .

Addresses current approaches to studying Native American traditional knowledge and acknowledges an Indian intellectualism that has up until now been ignored in studying Native American history.

Indian Mind in a Linear World : American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge. Fixico has accomplished a task long time coming.

The American Indian Mind in a Linear World : American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge. The importance of this book may well be over looked by those who need the information most. Historians, Anthropoligists, and myriad teachers. Finally someone has set to print the causes of many misunderstandings twixt the European mindset and the thought patterns of the Original People (OP). The neuances that the OP take as givens are all but lost on those bound by linear thinking.

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Authis
Being raised in an all-white environment, I often wondered why I saw things so differently in school, politics, and teaching. When I learned of and began to embrace a heritage my grandfather was trying to run away from, I found so many answers to those questions. Contrary to the deficiency-based view of native culture that dominates much of educational practice and some research, Fixico's book provides an excellent entry point to literature that recognizes and celebrates our differences from the mainstream culture. This book is a must read for anyone involved in education. Especially so for anyone wishing to serve the Native American community, but certainly no less important for EVERY educator. The bibliography alone would be worth the price of the book. I would love to hear from other readers both positive and negative.
Shalinrad
I tried very hard to like this book. I wanted, so much, to be challenged by it, to be moved by it. I saw this book as an opportunity to better understand how colonial ideology plays out in academia and in daily life, so as to more effectively work against it. I am sympathetic to the author's central claims: that traditional Native culture embraces a holistic understanding of existence; that this understanding is the foundation from which grows the distinct knowledges of different tribes and the individual; that this traditional knowledge is passed on to ensuing generations through a developed and sophisticated oral tradition; that all of these contribute to a worldview in which past, present, and future are not separate, but interconnected and continuous; and that this holistic perspective is antithetical to the secular, historical materialism that underlies and informs Euro-American thought.

The problem is that all of these claims have been made elsewhere, and they have been made more cogently, concisely, poetically, and beautifully. I am aware that, just as Native knowledge grows from a different worldview than Euro-American thought, it may be (and possibly should be) presented in ways difficult for non-Natives to comprehend. I am thus not arguing that Fixico should read like Plato or Heidegger. In fact, as part of my dedication to liking this book, I made myself reread passages aloud, wondering if the repetition of "thus" and "therefore" to the point of meaninglessness, the meandering paragraphs strung together apparently unconnected by logic (broadly defined) or subject matter, the use of vague terminology and introduction of Important Capitalized Phrases that are never defined, the unsupported and wildly generalized claims ranging from the puzzling (Native people process the world through their right brain lobe?) to the offensive (blood quantum is an accurate barometer of how traditional an individual is), might all make more sense presented in an oral format. I would read several chapters in one sitting, hoping that immersion in the author's language would make the fuzzy, hazy reasoning resolve into clarity. When none of these strategies worked, I considered that all of this might be deliberate, that the author's style attempted to viscerally convey intuitive, holistic comprehension through obfuscation of particulars. If it is, it may work for others. It did not for me.

Three other texts I read for the same course as this were much more effective presentations of similar arguments, sometimes immediately comprehensible, oftener only after long reflection: Gregory Cajete's "Native Science: Natural Laws of Interdependence" argues that traditional knowledge constitutes a valid and arguably superior alternative to Western science, which is not to say it is the same thing; "American Indian Thought," edited by Anne Waters, collects several excellent essays and articles addressing and critiquing Western philosophical fields (ethics, cosmology, epistemology, etc.) via Native perspectives; and "Spirit & Reason" is a handy introduction to the work of Vine Deloria, Jr., whose work remains absolutely fundamental.

If you are a teacher or student looking for introductory texts in Native American Studies or Native philosophy, I would strongly encourage you to consider other options. If you are simply interested in the subject, read this book only if you are already familiar with general concepts in Native thought and don't mind wading through vague filler.
Downloaded
nonNative educatorss ought to read this
Unsoo
The importance of this book may well be over looked by those who need the information most. Historians, Anthropoligists, and myriad teachers. Finally someone has set to print the causes of many misunderstandings twixt the European mindset and the thought patterns of the Original People (OP). Fixico has accomplished a task long time coming. The neuances that the OP take as givens are all but lost on those bound by linear thinking. The world view of The OP when compared with White European Males (WEMs) is such that one is compareing a handful of dirt (WEMs) while the other (OP) is thinking of the Universe.

WEMs have no problem destroying the earth not realizing, as the OP do, that the earth is not all forgiving. WEMs can not wrap their munds around spatial thinking and the OP choose not to do otherwise. The all inclusive universe is considered on all levels by the OP. WEMs do not approach many levels. I'm not quite sure if this can be changed as it takes a great deal of faith in something other than a dollar.

I watch in amazement and wonderment at times as people try to understand what I'm saying. Too me everything is connected with everything else.

Thanx Fixico and may he always Walk in Beauty. You too