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by Adrian Boas
Download Archaeology of the Military Orders: A Survey of the Urban Centres, Rural Settlements and Castles of the Military Orders in the Latin East (c.1120–1291) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Adrian Boas
  • ISBN:
    0415299802
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415299800
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (April 19, 2006)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1876 kb
  • ePUB format
    1256 kb
  • DJVU format
    1826 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    230
  • Formats:
    doc mobi txt lrf


the Teutonic Knights. the Leper Knights of St Lazarus. the Knights of St Thomas.

in the Latin East (. 120–1291) Hardcover – 9 Mar 2006

by Adrian Boas (Author).

15. 1 The urban Quarters of the Templars.

First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company. Expansion into the countryside.

Przeczytaj go w aplikacji Książki Google Play na komputerze albo na urządzeniu z Androidem lub iOS. Pobierz, by czytać offline. Adrian Boas provides comprehensive coverage of the key topics connected to crusader archaeology, including an examination of urban and rural settlements, agriculture, industry, the military, the church, public and private architecture, arts and crafts, leisure pursuits, death and burial and building techniques.

Macmillan, (c)1902 On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or. .

leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Assisi. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Including previously unpublished and little known material, this cutting-edge book presents a detailed discussion of the archaeological evidence of the five military orders in the Latin East: the Hospitallers the Templars the Teutonic Knights the Leper Knights of St Lazarus the Knights of St Thomas. Discussing in detail the distinctive architecture relating to their various undertakings (such as hospitals in Jerusalem and Acre) Adrian Boas places emphasis on the importance of the Military Orders in the development of military architecture in the Middle Ages. The three principal sections of the book consist of chapters relating to the urban quarters of the Orders in Jerusalem, Acre and other cities, their numerous rural possessions, and the tens of castles built or purchased and expanded in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. A highly illustrated and detailed study, this comprehensive volume will be an essential read for any archaeology student or scholar of this period.

Llanonte
Fantastic resource.
Mikale
An academic study which provides reference to earlier workers and brings up to date the latest findings. Full of fascinating detail and easy to work through. Logically presented the book discusses and amends where necessary the ideas of other students of crusader archeology. Very readable.
Bluecliff
Bottom Line Up Front: Very good read.

Adrian Boas has done a very thorough and well job in his study here. First things first though; although Boas did set out from the introduction to only cover archaeological study of the Crusades in the Holy Land until 1291, one does feel cut short that he didn't take it further into other areas and the years after 1291 (that, I suppose, will be covered in excellent detail in his second volume, if and when it ever comes out). For the student and scholar this is a great source to get your hands on; trust me when I say the money is worth the book. For the greater public at large this may be a bit out of league with more popular studies of the Crusades; even still, Boas writes fluidly and in a lucidity and engaging style not common with the more prosiac, more technical, and more un-self-aware writing of his colleagues among both the archaeological and Crusader scholar communities.